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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just ordered a 64GB M4 but i dont know how i should go about installing it
i dont know whether i should go SSD alone or go SRT. im tempted towards SRT as im lazy and cannot be bothered messing about to optimize the SSD using the guide on the forum.
Most likely i'll go SRT but which SRT? there's two to types maximized and performance i think; performance is when the cached data isnt backed up so if a power cut happens, files get deleted and this is my worry since i am college especially. If i use performance and have work on it, will it get saved to the cache or the HDD itself so if cached data is lost, my work wont be?

what do you guys think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yh the update will be the first thing i do
the warning is a little worrying though... it is safe isnt it? just like a BIOS update? only screwed if power goes?
 

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Yep. download 0009 firmware, burn it into a CD using the integrated burner in Windows (what I use) boot into disc, type yes, upgrade, restart. Though I had to reinstall Windows after the update.

Do NOT use SRT. It would be the daftest thing to do. In SRT, all you end up with is a faster HDD, while you can make use of the lightning-fast speeds on a SSD.

Do CrystalDiskMark tests, you should get 500Mb/s on Sequiential Reads (impt for boot), 180-200Mb/s Writes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by A14M3D;15342195
Most likely i'll go SRT but which SRT? there's two to types maximized and performance i think; performance is when the cached data isnt backed up so if a power cut happens, files get deleted and this is my worry since i am college especially. If i use performance and have work on it, will it get saved to the cache or the HDD itself so if cached data is lost, my work wont be?
Actually, isn't performance SRT mean that the data is only written to the SSD, so if you lose power you will still be fine? The only way you should lose data there is if the SSD dies you could lose anything that hasn't been copied to the HDD yet.

Whether or not you should use SRT is basically up to how much time you want to spend managing which programs are on which drive. You can setup SRT and install everything to one logical drive (and leave the caching to the system) or move programs you want most (which may/may not be cached using SRT) on the SSD to be there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou;15342467
Separate SSD for advanced user. SRT for novice user.
i just cant be bothered looking after it though, especially because i am at college, studies come first...

i dont like the idea of my SSD filling up with rubbish like temp. files and stuff
 

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Mine updated fine m8, no need to reinstall or anything.

Just make sure you have your SATA configuration to IDE and ideally the SSD should be in SATA port 0-3. The updater will automatically detect your drive and update with your permission.

(may take a few minutes)

Once the update is complete change your SATA config back to AHCI in your BIOS and you're good to go!

(ALWAYS backup irreplaceable files!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hmmmm
It doesn't mention that it has to be updated in IDE mode
I will do a fresh install haven't got much on my pc anyway
Can I just prepare everything first, update firmware then change to AHCI and just install windows normally onto SSD and install all programmes onto it and store files onto HDD and just leave it that way, no other messing about, would this be fine?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou;15342467
Separate SSD for advanced user. SRT for novice user.
This statement is far too sweeping. I definitely think SRT has its place where an SSD on its own is not appropriate. I use a 512GB Crucial M4 as my boot / OS / program drive and a RAID 10 array where I store my \Users hierarchy.

All my photos and important data and the like are stored on the RAID array. I would not consider putting them on an SSD as I want the size and the redundancy offered by the RAID 10 array. I frequently edit a photo several times in Lightroom before finally publishing it and I'd like to have my RAID array perform as fast as possible so that photo load times are minimized. An SSD cache does a fabulous job of this. Once I've accessed the photo once or twice, it's in the cache.

So I have a separate 60GB OCZ Vertex 3 that I use to cache the RAID array. The cheap cost of the 60GB SSD justifies almost any amount of performance improvement on my RAID array. I would not use an SSD alone for this data, so the choice between SRT or SSD is irrelevant here. It's either vanilla RAID or SRT enhanced RAID. IF you don't care about the cost of the cache, then the SRT-enhanced RAID is a no-brainer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by complexlogic
View Post

This statement is far too sweeping. I definitely think SRT has its place where an SSD on its own is not appropriate. I use a 512GB Crucial M4 as my boot / OS / program drive and a RAID 10 array where I store my \\Users hierarchy.

All my photos and important data and the like are stored on the RAID array. I would not consider putting them on an SSD as I want the size and the redundancy offered by the RAID 10 array. I frequently edit a photo several times in Lightroom before finally publishing it and I'd like to have my RAID array perform as fast as possible so that photo load times are minimized. An SSD cache does a fabulous job of this. Once I've accessed the photo once or twice, it's in the cache.

So I have a separate 60GB OCZ Vertex 3 that I use to cache the RAID array. The cheap cost of the 60GB SSD justifies almost any amount of performance improvement on my RAID array. I would not use an SSD alone for this data, so the choice between SRT or SSD is irrelevant here. It's either vanilla RAID or SRT enhanced RAID. IF you don't care about the cost of the cache, then the SRT-enhanced RAID is a no-brainer.


but for me who just wants to speed up his computer without wasting space on SSD, which idea would be better suited?
im just thinking of simply installing softwares on it, then files on HDD
what is the point and benefit of doing whats in this article:
http://www.overclock.net/ssd/664738-...secondary.html

further down it seems some people suffer issues like files being in different partitions and so on, i dont want to bother with all that since i just wont have the time, like i said i dont want to waste much time
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by A14M3D;15342195
I have just ordered a 64GB M4 but i dont know how i should go about installing it
i dont know whether i should go SSD alone or go SRT. im tempted towards SRT as im lazy and cannot be bothered messing about to optimize the SSD using the guide on the forum.
Most likely i'll go SRT but which SRT? there's two to types maximized and performance i think; performance is when the cached data isnt backed up so if a power cut happens, files get deleted and this is my worry since i am college especially. If i use performance and have work on it, will it get saved to the cache or the HDD itself so if cached data is lost, my work wont be?

what do you guys think?
You have no choice but to go with SRT. A 64 Gb SSD is way too small.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the links guys and help
 
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