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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I got the new Aerocool DS 120mm fans and love 'em, and I had one running on the included 7 volt power adapter. I assume these adapters are an IC voltage regulator, right? The one I have is getting pretty hot...hot enough to notice when touched, and that's through the nice cable sleeving it came with.

1. Are these supposed to get hot?

2. Am I just as safe, or safer, doing the 12 volt to 5 volt trick?

Thanks,

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweenytodd View Post

Yes, fan speed reducer are supposed to get hot because of the load resistor in them.
Okay, that's kind of what I thought. Is it better to use the 12 to 5 volt Molex "reassignment" trick then?
 

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That is normal operation of the resistor.
I ran 3 aerocool shark 120 fans for 2 years with the 7 volt adapters they were always fairly warm.
The excess voltage is dissipated as heat.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsmith24 View Post

Okay, that's kind of what I thought. Is it better to use the 12 to 5 volt Molex "reassignment" trick then?
Personally I think that it is a bad idea.
The fan might not have enough starting voltage to get it running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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Originally Posted by rollingdice View Post

Personally I think that it is a bad idea.
The fan might not have enough starting voltage to get it running.
Starting voltage on these is right at 3 volts. However, I'm thinking maybe a fan controller would be the way to go if I decide to run at less than 12 volts. These can also be controlled by my motherboard (Asus Fan Xpert), but I've only got one header that will do that, and two fans. Not sure if a splitter exists for that, or if so - if that would be wise, either.

Thanks,
Jack
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweenytodd View Post

Yes, fan speed reducer are supposed to get hot because of the load resistor in them.
Yup, they basically "waste" the additional energy that was suppose to go to the fan. They do so by converting the energy to heat.

This is why PWM control is more efficient.
 
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