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Discussion Starter #1
So I had some time this week and am slowly working on my first overclock on this Phenom II. Got to 3.7, but didn't really test for stability that well, so I figure hey, let's bump the voltage a bit and try 3.8, if it fails I'll go from there. Well 10 hours of P95 (large FFTs) later it seems my chip likes the new frequency. I've barely touched the voltages really.. In bios they are:
CPU: 1.425
NB: 1.11
CPUNB: 1.11

Though CPUZ shows a lower core voltage for some reason. Anyway I was originally thinking of stopping here but should I go for 4ghz? Load temps are 47-50C. Proof
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Penecks View Post
So I had some time this week and am slowly working on my first overclock on this Phenom II. Got to 3.7, but didn't really test for stability that well, so I figure hey, let's bump the voltage a bit and try 3.8, if it fails I'll go from there. Well 10 hours of P95 (large FFTs) later it seems my chip likes the new frequency. I've barely touched the voltages really.. In bios they are:
CPU: 1.425
NB: 1.11
CPUNB: 1.11

Though CPUZ shows a lower core voltage for some reason. Anyway I was originally thinking of stopping here but should I go for 4ghz? Load temps are 47-50C. Proof
It's always fun to see how high you can go. What's your ambient temperature?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by IT.Wall
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I got to 4.0 on the 965 be with out touching the volts

You haven't posted any
with proper stress testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Quote:


Originally Posted by IT.Wall
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I got to 4.0 on the 965 be with out touching the volts

Huh? Your CPUZ in the other thread says you're at 1.44v.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry for double post, but I'm at 3.9 now, 6 hours of P95 large FFTs and 20 passes of LinX. Would you say that is stable?


Also had a question about the Vcore value in CPUZ, mine seems to jump around from 1.420-1.440 even though in BIOS it is 1.435, is this normal?
 

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Wait, hold on, you don't need to touch the CPU/NB or NB voltages at all if you're just overclocking your CPU via its CPU multiplier (leaving the FSB alone at the default 200MHz). Thus you can safely leave your CPU/NB and NB voltages to "Auto".

For the CPU, I would basically set the stock voltage and multiplier manually, so 1.4000V and 17.00x. Then keep lowering your voltage until it becomes unstable so up it one step and this is your lowest stock clock speed voltage (for reference mine is 1.3875V and I can get up to and including 3.7GHz stable with this). Then start upping the multiplier step by step (0.50x increments) until it becomes unstable. At this point, up the CPU voltage only by one step. Do this until it's stable again, then go back to incrementing the CPU multiplier step by step. Do this whilst keeping an eye on temperatures and making sure you don't get to 60°C or very near it whilst stress testing. Keep in mind that the recommended maximum CPU voltage is 1.5500V unless you have extraordinary cooling.

Once you're happy with your CPU overclock, set everything back down to stock as you noted at the very beginning and begin overclocking your CPU/NB. Set 2400MHz for example and keep the stock voltage of 1.1000V. Test for stability and keep upping your voltage until it's stable, at which point go for 2600MHz and stabilise it in the same manner. If you want, go up from here to 2800MHz or even 3000MHz if you're adventurous but keep in mind that the CPU/NB voltage shouldn't exceed around 1.4000V. 2600MHz is a generous overclock and is a good point to stop.

Once you know what CPU voltage gives you a good CPU overclock and what CPU/NB voltage gives you a good CPU/NB overclock, set them and you're good to go!
If you want, test for stability with BOTH things overclocked at once. In either case, leave the NB voltage alone as it doesn't need to be touched. This is all assuming you're doing the overclocking solely by multipliers and not touching the default 200MHz FSB.

For reference, these are my overclocks:

FSB: 200MHz (Default)
CPU Multiplier: 19.50x (3.9GHz)
CPU Voltage: 1.5125V
CPU/NB: 2600MHz
CPU/NB Voltage: 1.3000V

Please keep in mind that voltages are guidelines as a lot of people can reach 3.9GHz with less voltage than me - my CPU doesn't seem to be very good.

EDIT: Disable Cool 'n' Quiet whilst you're doing all this, so you don't get any "false positives" on stability. Once you're happy it's perfect, you can re-enable it although if you get to 3.8GHz or above, there's no point in re-enabling it as it won't do anything anymore.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Gib007
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Wait, hold on, you don't need to touch the CPU/NB or NB voltages at all if you're just overclocking your CPU via its CPU multiplier (leaving the FSB alone at the default 200MHz). Thus you can safely leave your CPU/NB and NB voltages to "Auto".

This isn't true. Many have to adjust this value even with the NB at stock voltages to get stability.

If you are increasing your CPU clock, it's only normal that you would have to increase the voltage of connected bus' to support this higher frequency.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by doritos93
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This isn't true. Many have to adjust this value even with the NB at stock voltages to get stability.

If you are increasing your CPU clock, it's only normal that you would have to increase the voltage of connected bus' to support this higher frequency.

If you keep it on "Auto", you ensure it'll work. At least that's throughout all my experiences in the past and now. The adjustment for stability would have to be minor, in which case "Auto" will do what the name suggests.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Quote:
For the CPU, I would basically set the stock voltage and multiplier manually, so 1.4000V and 17.00x.
My BIOS doesn't seem to allow me quite this level of precision with regards to voltages. And regarding the NB voltage, after looking at many other overclocks, I figured I wouldn't be getting very far with stock volts, especially after the trouble it gave me trying to configure my RAM.

Quote:
Set 2400MHz for example and keep the stock voltage of 1.1000V.
Is this the CPUNB or NB voltage? Also would I need extra cooling, my NB temps are about 55C @ load, though I heard these are more durable than CPUs.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Gib007 View Post
If you keep it on "Auto", you ensure it'll work. At least that's throughout all my experiences in the past and now. The adjustment for stability would have to be minor, in which case "Auto" will do what the name suggests.
I'm not sure what you mean. It means that the motherboard will automatically set the voltage to a default value specified by the manufacturer.

Were you saying that the "Auto" setting changes the voltage as per demand???
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Penecks View Post
Is this the CPUNB or NB voltage? Also would I need extra cooling, my NB temps are about 55C @ load, though I heard these are more durable than CPUs.
CPUNB voltage is what you need to adjust.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by doritos93 View Post
I'm not sure what you mean. It means that the motherboard will automatically set the voltage to a default value specified by the manufacturer.

Were you saying that the "Auto" setting changes the voltage as per demand???

Hehe yeah, I could easily get 3.8GHz stable with "Auto" on CPU voltage. CPU-Z shows me that it's automatically adjusted and it's done pretty damn well too. Unfortunately 3.9GHz is not stable with "Auto" but a swift 1.5125V does the trick. The problem with "Auto" is that it generally goes a bit too far with voltage. It's safe, but a bit too much for what's really needed. However, it does seem to do away with instabilities that would otherwise pop up, in these cases. For example, my "NB Voltage" is still on "Auto" and I have no intention of changing it - works great!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Gib007 View Post
Hehe yeah, I could easily get 3.8GHz stable with "Auto" on CPU voltage. CPU-Z shows me that it's automatically adjusted and it's done pretty damn well too. Unfortunately 3.9GHz is not stable with "Auto" but a swift 1.5125V does the trick. The problem with "Auto" is that it generally goes a bit too far with voltage. It's safe, but a bit too much for what's really needed. However, it does seem to do away with instabilities that would otherwise pop up, in these cases. For example, my "NB Voltage" is still on "Auto" and I have no intention of changing it - works great!

Your explanation is so long and detailed it almost made me doubt myself.

In your BIOS, when you set something to "Auto", it means the BIOS will load a default value (specified by the manufacturer) and assigns it to that specific parameter. It in no way means that the BIOS will vary the voltage supplied based on demand. No no no.

When you see Vcore change in CPU-Z it's because of one of two things. A) Throttling done by CnQ or another similar driver. B) When your cpu is under load Vcore will drop a little (known as vdroop)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by doritos93 View Post
Your explanation is so long and detailed it almost made me doubt myself.

In your BIOS, when you set something to "Auto", it means the BIOS will load a default value (specified by the manufacturer) and assigns it to that specific parameter. It in no way means that the BIOS will vary the voltage supplied based on demand. No no no.

When you see Vcore change in CPU-Z it's because of one of two things. A) Throttling done by CnQ or another similar driver. B) When your cpu is under load Vcore will drop a little (known as vdroop)
When I set my CPU voltage on "Auto" and overclocked to 3.8GHz, CPU-Z was reporting 1.51V going through my CPU, on average (it obviously fluctuates). When I clock it down a bit, it doesn't get this high (it hovers around a significantly lower value). It seems it really is supplying more voltage according to the overclock. Granted setting it manually is better anyway as you can usually get away with less.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well looks like 4ghz is a success. I haven't ran P95 yet but I think 25 passes of LinX is decent for now. I had to up the CPUNB a notch after it crashed 3 passes in. Final settings were:

200 x 20
Vcore: 1.435
CPUNB: 1.12
NB: 1.11

Oh and max temp was 54-55C. This seems kinda highish, but doesn't LinX testing specifically go for high temps? My P95 full load temps are generally 3-4C lower.



Gonna mess with the NB oc next week... I find overclocking is something that actually goes well with a busy schedule.. all that darn stress testing
 

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Lucky, it's impressive how 4.0GHz works with 1.4325V, well done. I have 1.5125V for just 3.9GHz. What s***, lol!

I'm wondering though, with all this discussion of NB voltage needing to be set manually for stability, that perhaps if I actually set mine to say 1.1100V (as you have), that perhaps I can stabilise my CPU at 3.9GHz with less voltage and thus get it stable at 4.0GHz or so. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What type of error are you getting at 4ghz? Here's a quote from one of the stickied threads here that I found helpful:

Quote:
-Instability can be helped a lot by upping the CPU NB Vid a few notches.
-Bluescreen crashes are related to IMC/Memory instability, Black screens related to cpu clocks/voltage and freezes/sudden restarts related to temperatures.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Penecks View Post
What type of error are you getting at 4ghz? Here's a quote from one of the stickied threads here that I found helpful:
The quote is good but there are some inconsistencies with my experience. An instability is a very general term meaning your CPU has something as minor as a rounding error whilst stress testing or something as major as a complete system restart. The voltage you notch up is the voltage relating to your overclock.

It's true that most of my blue screen crashes have been related to the CPU/NB voltage needing upping and most of my black screen crashes have been related to the CPU voltage needing upping. That said however, the freezing/restarts I have got with Prime95 stress testing have ALL been due to lack of CPU voltage and never related to temperatures. It depends on your CPU model but mine has a maximum safe rated temperature of 62°C. Granted it can take more than that but it isn't recommended for a long period of time. In either case, my full load temperature never goes above 48°C and this is well overclocked. Throughout all my stress testing, the most common crash I have got is a simple freeze/restart and the temperatures were as good as I've just mentioned.

In general:

- Blue screen crashes mean more CPU/NB voltage
- Black screen crashes and freezes mean more CPU voltage

Both may be accompanied by a reboot, especially if you haven't disabled "Automatically restart" on your computer in the case of a blue screen appearing. This option is enabled by default when you install Windows. Granted however, this is assuming your temperatures are ok throughout - make sure they are and then you know it never relates to temperatures and you also know you're 100% safe.

However, the best way to overclock is to do one thing at a time - baby steps!
First leave your CPU/NB at stock, both clock speed and voltage. Overclock your CPU alone and get to what you think is the best clock speed and make sure it's stable for you to be happy with it. Once that's set, put your CPU back on stock clock speed and voltage. Now play with the CPU/NB overclock and again get it to your desired clock speed and make sure it's stable and are happy with it. Now overclock both the CPU and CPU/NB as you found to be individually stable. In theory everything should remain stable but a further test is a good idea. Then use the blue screen / black screen crashing guideline to iron out what voltage needs raising a notch.
 
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