Overclock.net banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty sure I can get to my Windows (NTFS) drives through SuSE 10.2, right?

I've done it before, so how do I do it?
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mad_Handlez89 View Post
When I did it I accessed it throught the ROOT folder, cant remember any specifics though

I tried that, can't find it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,351 Posts
I think if you're on a Reiser (spelling) patition for Linux, then you can read NTFS but cannot write to it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,957 Posts
I found this, its not specific to your partitions but It could help you


Open the terminal windows

Quote:
mount /dev/hda1 /windows/C
Hope this helps
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mad_Handlez89 View Post
I found this, its not specific to your partitions but It could help you


Open the terminal windows

Hope this helps

Nope, didn't work.

Quote:
[email protected]:~> mount /dev/hda1 /windows/c
mount: dette kan kun root gøre
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/hda1 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/hda2 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/hda3 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/hda4 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/hda5 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/sda1 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/sda2 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/sda3 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/sda4 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
[email protected]:~> sudo mount /dev/sda5 /windows/c
mount: mount point /windows/c does not exist
How do you take a screenie anyways?
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Okay, I got it mounted, but it says:

Quote:
Couldn't access the folder /windows/c
Does that mean that I need to somehow configure it?
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Quote:

Originally Posted by ENTERPRISE1701 View Post
Sounds like you need to Specify Admin rights for acces to that Folder..However this can only be done in Windows..This will help you : http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=381667
Yeah I figured that out in like 2 minutes.
Now the problem is to how I read the subfiles, LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,102 Posts
I picked up a nifty little program called NTFS-3G, using YUMEX. It lets you read and write to NTFS drives, although it recommends that you DO NOT write to system files and such.

So far it works a treat, I haven't figured out how to auto-mount yet though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
You could change the permission rights in Linux too using chmod, so like:
chmod 777 -r /windows/c

And probably the better way is to just add a line to /etc/fstab that way the permission right don't need to be changed. The user who mounted it is given full permission.
I don't believe you'll be able to write to the drive right now though in linux. Thats way NTFS is a pain to work with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,847 Posts
Just install the NTFS kernel module and do it that way. SIMPERL

EDIT: If that was a stupid comment, forgive me. I didn't read the posts...at all >_<
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,847 Posts
*cough* its spelt kernel


Yeah. linux-ntfs rocks. YAST for kmod-ntfs, that should do something similar. I'm assuming that the naming convention isn't too different from fedora and debian.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,847 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by dangerousHobo
View Post

You could change the permission rights in Linux too using chmod, so like:
chmod 777 -r /windows/c

And probably the better way is to just add a line to /etc/fstab that way the permission right don't need to be changed. The user who mounted it is given full permission.
I don't believe you'll be able to write to the drive right now though in linux. Thats way NTFS is a pain to work with.

Speaking of NTFS and linux. This whole dealy with M$ and Novell might make the write support 100% safe. I mean, theres gotta be some give and take. You could always do what I do. Install XP into a Fat32 partition. It has its limitations, but I dont care.
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Okay guys, I'm not on that rig right now, but I got it all working fine and dandy, I only need to get WINE installed, and copied some games over to my Linux partition...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by The_Jester
View Post

Speaking of NTFS and linux. This whole dealy with M$ and Novell might make the write support 100% safe. I mean, theres gotta be some give and take. You could always do what I do. Install XP into a Fat32 partition. It has its limitations, but I dont care.

Yeah I have windows in NTFS, and then have an external drive that is in FAT32 and I use that as my share between the two.
I hope that the M$ and Novell deal does lead to some good things for those of us who use both.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,590 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by Jimmy2Shoe
View Post

Ummm... I can write to a NTFS partiton from within Linux... is there something I'm missing?

Well, you are able to write to a NTFS partiton, its just that in the past its been shown to not be 100% safe. Non-bootable windows partition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,102 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by dangerousHobo
View Post

Well, you are able to write to a NTFS partiton, its just that in the past its been shown to not be 100% safe. Non-bootable windows partition.


Oh, ok... thanks for the clarification


I'll probably still do it, my data isn't critical anyways.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top