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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After all, the internet isn't free. If I can be solicited for an ad pass then I'm returning the favor by sending them an email asking for them to set up a payment arrangement to help me pay my cable bill!! After all, each ad that loads increases my data usage.

Here's the email I got in response:
Thank you for your feedback.

To keep AccuWeather.com a free service and provide forecasts and warnings and other information valued for their Superior Accuracy™, such as our allergy index, we need to display advertising to cover the cost of operating the best weather site on the web. We are sensitive to our users’ concerns, however, and that is why we strive to offer a reasonable volume of contextually relevant ads, and we hope that you will consider white-listing AccuWeather.com while using your ad-blocker. We appreciate your understanding and your input and hope that you will continue to plan your days with AccuWeather.com.

You might be interested to know AccuWeather.com offers an ad-free service called Premium AccuWeather.com -- for more information click here.​
 

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Premium User fee

I propose we start a 'guild' or 'union' of users where we collectively charge a 'premium user fee' for our patronage. I mean, after all in business plans like FBook YOU are the product.

So lets embrace it and get together and market ourselves instead of letting some 3rd party devour our information and resell it.

We will white/black list sites we will visit and then they can charge their advertisers appropriately. After all being a human who consumes multimedia isn't free right?


p.s. I'm not "new to overclock.net" but the site is all jacked up so, whatever...
 

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Ever Forward.
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It's a business. Like any website that provides "free" access to content, ads is how they make money that keeps that content free. In turn, like many websites, they offer a premium service to paid subscribers that's usually free of ads in addition to premium features. Don't see the issue here.

Even OCN offers "Overclocked" accounts where you can disable ads. The only difference, OCN doesn't yet show any popups requesting you disable your adblocker.
 

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Did you know that, when you pay the bill your ISP sends you, they don't actually forward it to the websites you look at to cover their costs?

By that logic I should be allowed to take things from stores without paying because I already pay taxes on the roads. :thumb:

EDIT: Also, web hosts often pay by the byte. You do not. You pay for speed. Every time you load the page without ads, you cost them money. However, you do not cost yourself money because downloads are free - you're just paying for the pipe.
 

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Waiting for 7nm EUV
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The problem with on-line advertisement is that it is very different from traditional paper magazine / newspaper / billboard ads, and in most cases their new differentiating factors work against the consumer.

When you're reading paper media, the ads are just there. They aren't tracking you, they don't jump out of the paper, they don't play sounds, they don't use your nearby toaster to make money and they don't spread viruses. All of the behind the scenes relationships between the magazine and the ad agencies already happened before you bought the magazine, it's all static now and you're safe, bar the usual marketing tricks to try to convince you to buy stuff, but that's a given.

And the problem is, when it comes to on-line, you never know what you're going to find until it's too late unless you have an ad / tracker / script-blocker, whereas with paper media you don't have to have that kind of precaution. You may go into a site that self-hosts perfectly adequate ads in only text and images or you may go into a site that has real-time relationships with a dozen different ad agencies that your browser fetches information from, that in turn have hundreds of clients and you have, by extension, to trust all of those entities that you've never heard about. And then those ads can be anything from harmless, to bandwidth intensive video ads, to javascript powered cryptocurrency mining scripts, to outright exploits.

Sites usually don't want to handle the burden of hosting and handling advertisement management and even if some do, advertisers in turn may not trust a site to self-host because that way they don't have such a reliable way to determine whether the site has the declared impact on a daily basis or not. Add to that, ad agencies and advertisers want to have direct control over ads because that allows them to build profiles on consumers and merge information from several databases and extract what they perceive to be maximum optimization and profit.

Meanwhile, consumers are required to accept unreasonable risks and have an unreasonable amount of trust in entities that they've never heard about and that usually change overnight.

At the end of the day the on-line advertisement framework, as it is now, knows no bounds and has serious trust and datamining problems. How on earth did a cryptocurrency mining script land on YouTube the other day? Because YouTube allows advertisers to place javascript on their site, which should be a no-go if people are to begin contemplating trusting the system.

The day that an adblocker or script blocker actually doesn't block any ads because they are self hosted and harmless text and pictures, that ideal day is when consumers will be protected, but for that to happen advertisers would have to relinquish a lot of the information / power that they have now, so until they start making money below a certain threshold, the current mess will continue.
 

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It's a business. Like any website that provides "free" access to content, ads is how they make money that keeps that content free. In turn, like many websites, they offer a premium service to paid subscribers that's usually free of ads in addition to premium features. Don't see the issue here.

Even OCN offers "Overclocked" accounts where you can disable ads. The only difference, OCN doesn't yet show any popups requesting you disable your adblocker.
Did you know that, when you pay the bill your ISP sends you, they don't actually forward it to the websites you look at to cover their costs?

By that logic I should be allowed to take things from stores without paying because I already pay taxes on the roads. :thumb:

EDIT: Also, web hosts often pay by the byte. You do not. You pay for speed. Every time you load the page without ads, you cost them money. However, you do not cost yourself money because downloads are free - you're just paying for the pipe.
Exactly these.

You're paying your ISP to be able to view those web pages, you're not paying your ISP to pay for those "free" websites.
 
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