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When you add a graphics card to a cooling loop (H240x) and the pump\fan speed are linked to CPU temperature how does the GPU receive adequate cooling at load? Is there a way to link the fans and pump to both?

Thank you,
 

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The CPU temperature depends on the water temperature and so does the GPU temperature. And you can't have two different things controlling the water temp. One says "more cooling" and the other says "less cooling"?????

GPUs, though they run at a higher temperatures that CPUs, produce less heat (ie. they dump less watts into the water) and require less cooling .

So what you have to do when adding a GPU is to make sure that the added heat (watts) dumped into the water won't heat the water to the point that there isn't enough cooling left to cool the CPU adequately. If you do that the GPU will be fine.

Of course you could set up a complete, separate watercooling system for each and have each controlled by the heat of the component it is cooling. But the only reasons to do that would be if you were doing some extreme overclocking/bench marking. And even then it's pretty easy to design a WCing system that could handle both without the excess problems (and cost) of two loops.
 

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I set my fans to a water temp sensor. There is far less variance in temps, thus my fans spin up slower, making less noise.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

The CPU temperature depends on the water temperature and so does the GPU temperature. And you can't have two different things controlling the water temp. One says "more cooling" and the other says "less cooling"?????

GPUs, though they run at a higher temperatures that CPUs, produce less heat (ie. they dump less watts into the water) and require less cooling .

So what you have to do when adding a GPU is to make sure that the added heat (watts) dumped into the water won't heat the water to the point that there isn't enough cooling left to cool the CPU adequately. If you do that the GPU will be fine.

Of course you could set up a complete, separate watercooling system for each and have each controlled by the heat of the component it is cooling. But the only reasons to do that would be if you were doing some extreme overclocking/bench marking. And even then it's pretty easy to design a WCing system that could handle both without the excess problems (and cost) of two loops.
Correct me if im wrong but how does a 250w gpu produce less heat then a cpu when it uses far more amps then a cpu? V+a=W.

The water moves so fast that it barely stays over the gpu/cpu for a ridiculously short time. Once the water temperate settles, it settles it wont get any hotter or colder under load.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the information folks!

It's much appreciated. I found a nice OC on my GPU but it sounds like an airplane at full throttle thus the inquiry.
 

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Originally Posted by shark0311 View Post

Thanks for the information folks!

It's much appreciated. I found a nice OC on my GPU but it sounds like an airplane at full throttle thus the inquiry.
I have 2 rads for my loop but you can easily add a swiftech or ek predator on your gpu using one of those universal brackets. Provided you have room for a 240 rad.
 

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Originally Posted by shark0311 View Post

Are the universal water blocks up to the task or do I need to cool the VRM and RAM as well?
I would suggest cooling everything. Your stock air cooler has either passive cooling for those parts or is active and part of the processor cooling plate. Depending on the card your VRM temps can get pretty high. As a result of the processor and the VRM getting hot they also make the pcb hot. A lot of cards not have passive cooling through the backplate. This will help disperse pcb heat. All in all, a full cover card gives you the best cooling for all components and its easier to handle. I have no qualms about grabbing my cards anywhere when handling them. Also, once I get a look at my VRM temps when first testing a newly installed waterblock I know approximately what their temp will be under load according to the gpu's processor temp. Therefore, in my on-screen display I only keep the gpu's processor temp up there. Saves screen real-estate.

So, what kind of card is it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shark0311 View Post

Asus Strix 980Ti DC30C

OC 1578 MHz, 8000 MHz RAM
Get a full cover block for that beastly card, they look & cool better. EK makes a couple different blocks for that card.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Last question. Can I get away with adding a 120 mm rad to the loop (280 + 120) or do I need to add a 240?

You guys have been awesome BTW.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shark0311 View Post

Last question. Can I get away with adding a 120 mm rad to the loop (280 + 120) or do I need to add a 240?

You guys have been awesome BTW.
A 120 will work but I'd get a 240 anyway since they are normally just slightly more than 120 rads. You'd also be able to run the fans slower since there's more surface area.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shark0311 View Post

When you add a graphics card to a cooling loop (H240x) and the pump\fan speed are linked to CPU temperature how does the GPU receive adequate cooling at load? Is there a way to link the fans and pump to both?

Thank you,
Some might say otherwise but I wouldn't recommend putting the hardware in your system specs on a 240 rad.
It's going to effect your cpu temps on that OC considerably. If it was my rig I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it but it might work fine. If you're going to use fan targeting which again imho will be running full throttle when doing anything anyways due to radiator size take the temp from the cpu. A better alternative is sample the temp with a water probe since you might be pushing the loop kinda hard and responsive fan targeting will be important.

The tj max of your cpu is 100c and the 980ti is around 95c. So they both are unhappy at around eachothers breaking point. Also I have no idea what the heck billbartuska is talking about with gpu's dumping less heat into the loop then cpu's. Pretty sure mad typo's were in that post.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluej511 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

The CPU temperature depends on the water temperature and so does the GPU temperature. And you can't have two different things controlling the water temp. One says "more cooling" and the other says "less cooling"?????

GPUs, though they run at a higher temperatures that CPUs, produce less heat (ie. they dump less watts into the water) and require less cooling .

So what you have to do when adding a GPU is to make sure that the added heat (watts) dumped into the water won't heat the water to the point that there isn't enough cooling left to cool the CPU adequately. If you do that the GPU will be fine.

Of course you could set up a complete, separate watercooling system for each and have each controlled by the heat of the component it is cooling. But the only reasons to do that would be if you were doing some extreme overclocking/bench marking. And even then it's pretty easy to design a WCing system that could handle both without the excess problems (and cost) of two loops.
Correct me if im wrong but how does a 250w gpu produce less heat then a cpu when it uses far more amps then a cpu? V+a=W.

The water moves so fast that it barely stays over the gpu/cpu for a ridiculously short time. Once the water temperate settles, it settles it wont get any hotter or colder under load.
Perhaps I said that wrong. Since a GPU die is much smaller than a CPY die, and the GPU die runs at a much hotter temperature, the heat transfer from the GPU to the water is much more efficient than that of a CPU. So, if the CPU is OK, so will be the GPU. And, other than turbulance (turbulance - non laminar flow), flow rate has no effect on cooling.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

Perhaps I said that wrong. Since a GPU die is much smaller than a CPY die, and the GPU die runs at a much hotter temperature, the heat transfer from the GPU to the water is much more efficient than that of a CPU. So, if the CPU is OK, so will be the GPU. And, other than turbulance (turbulance - non laminar flow), flow rate has no effect on cooling.
Correct its more efficient therefore it will heat up the water much faster and with more heat. How do i know?With a 240 and a 360 stress test cpu raises the water 1-2C, gaming on a gpu intesive game with minimal cpu usage it will raise the water 6-7C. Thats running heaven which is very gpu intensive not so much cpu.

GPUs are 28nm huge die, cpus arz 22-14 ,uch smaller and much less wattage depending on the card.
 
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