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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to upgrade my current system from a dual-core to a quad-core to do more video transcoding, working with office contacts, and little gaming here and there.

This is the Board I've chosen (GIGABYTE GA-MA790GP-UD4H): http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16813128384
With this Core (Phenom II X4 940 Deneb 3.0GHz): http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16819103471
Will these work well together? Any random advice you could give?

Everything else on my system will remain the same (DDR2, HDD's, Radeon HD4850, etc). I'd like to overclock as far as I can on air-cooling, but with my luck I'm expecting maybe 3.6Ghz at best conditions (I live in Canada so the air is pretty cold
).

I'd also like to understand more about how overclocking the Phenom II works, because I hear words that ring no bells to me, ie. steppings, lapping, NB Clock, NB-Volt, HT-Link, Phase cooling, TEC cooling, etc. If I could just understand how electrons move in and out of a CPU, I think everything would make more sense. Right now, I'm hopelessly lost.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by FountainDew
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I'm looking to upgrade my current system from a dual-core to a quad-core to do more video transcoding, working with office contacts, and little gaming here and there.

This is the Board I've chosen (GIGABYTE GA-MA790GP-UD4H): http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16813128384
With this Core (Phenom II X4 940 Deneb 3.0GHz): http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16819103471
Will these work well together? Any random advice you could give?

Everything else on my system will remain the same (DDR2, HDD's, Radeon HD4850, etc). I'd like to overclock as far as I can on air-cooling, but with my luck I'm expecting maybe 3.6Ghz at best conditions (I live in Canada so the air is pretty cold
).

I'd also like to understand more about how overclocking the Phenom II works, because I hear words that ring no bells to me, ie. steppings, lapping, NB Clock, NB-Volt, HT-Link, Phase cooling, TEC cooling, etc. If I could just understand how electrons move in and out of a CPU, I think everything would make more sense. Right now, I'm hopelessly lost.


Phenoms really aren't much different to overclock than that X2. The HT link is more forgiving on Phenoms and you have ACC to help overclock more as well.

Just make sure to disable the onboard video in BIOS as that will make overclocking much easier. (I just built my bud a PII 920 rig)
 

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Well, let me simplify a few things:

Lapping is making the processor/heatsink perfectly flat via sanding to provide the best possible heat transfer by creating the largest possible contact point.

Phase cooling is much like what you'd see in a refrigerator, only in a more focused application.

TEC = Thermoelectric Cooling. Basically, it's a small flat wafer that has a hot side, and a cold side. It pulls the heat from the cold side and moves it to the hot side. Think of it as a fast acting mini heatsink. People use them in conjunction with other forms of cooling (generally water) to pull the heat away faster. the less heat on the hot side = the cooler the cold side is= the cooler the processor is.

Steppings refers to the numbers on the processor. Here's a good link for a database they're building here:

http://www.overclock.net/amd-cpus/44...-database.html

Um... NB clock/voltage refer to the northbridge. I'm not too good at describing these =p Hell, I might have messed up the descriptions of the others (though, I'm *pretty* sure I'm right...) Anyone feel free to correct/add to my comments


We're all here to learn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by yabo
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Lapping is making the processor/heatsink perfectly flat via sanding to provide the best possible heat transfer by creating the largest possible contact point.

Thanks for the quick replies! So then, if users have to sand their CPU surface flat, that means they are NOT flat from the manufacturer? OR does it just mean that there are small artifacts on the surface that could use some grinding out?

Can anyone also point me to a resource that explains how a CPU works, but in laymens? Thanks in advance
.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by FountainDew
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Thanks for the quick replies! So then, if users have to sand their CPU surface flat, that means they are NOT flat from the manufacturer? OR does it just mean that there are small artifacts on the surface that could use some grinding out?

Can anyone also point me to a resource that explains how a CPU works, but in laymens? Thanks in advance
.

I only wish... they're not flat. Lapping can produce about 5-10c lower temps in many cases (not all). The IHS is usually bowed (up towards the corners) when you buy them.

I *DO* have to throw this out there... the moment sandpaper touches your processor, your warranty runs screaming, and you're stuck with the consequences.

As for how the processor works... That'd take well beyond the time I have at work between phone calls to explain =)
 

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i just orderd my 720. but thats it, no board nothing. im planning to finish my build in april or whenever the HD4750/70 comes out. and that's it, after this build, i guess my next would be around antoehr 3-4 years from now. and good luck wit yours buddy.
 

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The NB is the link that the chip has with the memory. So the NB has a speed (NB clock), and the higher it is, the faster your memory will run, even if its not OC'd (because the communication between the memory and the IMC will be faster... so with OC'd ram, this helps out alot). The NB speed is based on the reference clock and the NB multi (works just like the CPU multi, but for the NB).

The HT link is very similar. It is the Hypertransport, and is used to communicate with the other components on the board (like what a FSB did, but with much higher bandwidth and speed). It is also based off of the reference clock.

Increasing voltage to these can help with their stability when you're OCin, just like most other components.

Stock AM2+ PhII's run at 3600MHz for both their NB and HT speeds (I'm pretty sure on that one, but I could be wrong, I have an AM3 one, which is slightly different). Most tests have shown that the speed of the HT link isn't very important, as the bandwidth is so large that there is almost never a bottleneck there. While OCin the NB gives the larger benefit to the system speed.

Good luck man.
 
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