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Quote:
Jeffrey Grossman explains that fulvalene diruthenium shows the potential to replace ruthenium. Fulvalene diruthenium can absorb solar energy. After trapping solar energy it can achieve a higher-energy state where it can remain stable ad infinitum. If a stimulus can be given in the form of heat or a catalyst, it reverts to its unique shape, releasing heat in the process.

Professor Grossman states, "It takes many of the advantages of solar-thermal energy, but stores the heat in the form of a fuel. It's reversible, and it's stable over a long term. You can use it where you want, on demand. You could put the fuel in the sun, charge it up, then use the heat, and place the same fuel back in the sun to recharge."
Source

thermo-chemical-solar-power.jpg


Nice Read!
 

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Holy shnickes,hopefully we will have this technology incorporated soon!

Unless Companies block this from coming to us!
 

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What are the conversion efficency rates?
What is the energy storage density?
Is there degradation and leakage?

Odds are these are too low right now to be useful...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo;11997003
What are the conversion efficency rates?
What is the energy storage density?
Is there degradation and leakage?
Odds are these are too low right now to be useful...
Greetz
I fully agree that such specs are needed to evaluate just how soon and how useful this can be. That said, the use of water, oils, or eutectic salts (phase change) for storage has been around for over 30 years (water, planetwide since there were oceans) and it seems to me unlikely that MIT would refer to this as a "breakthrough" if it's stats were less than those methods.

I think there is some room for cautious optimism.
smile.gif
 
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