Overclock.net banner

61 - 80 of 93 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
It's a very slick and powerful OS, no doubt about that. It just comes with VERY negative cons, how negative those cons are depends on where your priorities are at. An OS that will ignore direct commands of it's master, like one of the fundamental principles of how computing should work is a big deal killer, who's in charge me or Microsoft? Really that's a rhetorical question because I know the answer, it's pretty clear that Win 10 is MS prepping everyone for the software as a service 365 Windows in which the user will have very little say in the backend. Microsoft isn't really a traditional software company anymore they are a service provider, their cloud computing SAAS stuff generates most of their revenue and that's naturally where they are going to go.



What does that even mean... If anything "people" are likely more accustomed to XP or 98 than they are any mobile OS given that mobiles OS's as you know them have been around +/- 10-15yrs only. Unless by "people" you mean 15yr olds or post-2000's kids. It's very likely that most "people" have more seat time on non mobile traditional layout OS's.




The approach the software/IT security community seems to have taken in general is that they gave up on the user and now just force feed them for the greater good. Forced updates, ISP routers locked down, lock down walled garden ecosystems, etc.

It's amazing how much people are slaking in terms of computer knowledge in a world where computers are more prevalent than ever before. For example the average computer user today doesn't even understand the concept of "directories", something that was day 1 stuff in 1980's computer class; the concept of permissions, etc..

So there they go, running Win 10 in admin mode and get owned by an exe or .js exploit when they click on some "free NFL streams" link. Even tons of people here on a computer enthusiast forum run their daily drivers in admin mode, that I cannot comprehend.



I have LTSC and Enterprise, I was wondering what kind of spyware is present on LTSC? I was under the impression that there should be none seeing as it's made for embedded devices.



I've done everything short of modding the .iso, bash scripts, third party programs, router firewall, group policy, all the normal user accessible settings, etc.

I've heard about this "modding the iso" thing in passing, creating a custom Win 10 image. Given your explanation it seems pretty involving and something that requires regular sysadmin'ing to keep up but then again I'm no stranger to that. Where should I get started for info on this and what are some of the basic go-to programs/software used to create the custom Win 10 ISO? I have access to LTSC & Enterprise images/keys so I would be using those as a base.



Win 10 was my breaking point, at first I tried just sucking up 10 and doing the mods you see people hearing talking about but I eventually realized it was a lost cause, I just couldn't win and that energy could be better spent actually learning something I could control and went full nix.

You don't even realize how much you suck at computers until you go to nix land. Here I was sitting here like a bunch of guys on this forum thinking I actually knew stuff about computers because I could build them and OC them and torrented stuff... Then you jump into nix land and get punched in the face for how much you suck, you get laughed at, you're back at square one and a certified noob again. Most people usually rage quit but if you stick it through eventually you learn and rise through the ranks of the real computer-fu masters.



Summed it up pretty well.
So, if you want to go into the deep end, you can read through the microsoft documentation for use of DISM (Deployment Image Servicing and Management), which is an extremely potent tool created by microsoft and is meant for IT users (but anyone can learn and use it).
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/what-is-dism
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/dism-image-management-command-line-options-s14

This may be time consuming if you are not familiar with command line interfaces, regardless of the era you are from (I started with DOS, not fluent in Linux but learning, but have done CLI slipstreaming for XP service packs which got me my start digging deeper into deployment tools over the years). I am not as good as others at powershell commands either, but am functional, which you will want to learn a bit of as well (although most of what you will be doing is using guides of others work for any powershell changes you make, most likely).

Personally, I would say NTLite has one of the best GUIs to learn on. The creator took the time to set it up so that is runs the mods through DISM and other commands, but simplified it so you look for the component and just click a check box. That is right, that simple. You still need a working knowledge of what the component is and does so that you don't break the functionality of like your network connection not working, etc. But, to aid in this, the maker set it up so that you can click on compatibility and mark what you need for compatibility for the system and it will prevent you from removing those components. This helps greatly during the learning process (by the way, just plan on breaking a couple custom ISOs while learning, just don't activate the copy, tool around to find what is broken, then go back to tweaking the ISO until you get one working the way you want it to with what you want gone actually gone, then activate it).

That is a paid program though. There are free programs, like the MSMG toolkit (please donate to the developer if possible, these people work hard to provide these tools to the community), that will allow similar functions to NTLite, but the GUI is not the same and you may have a different learning curve on the software. That one is a powerful tool as well, but due to it being able to be gotten for free, it may lag a bit on incorporation of the new DISM and support for new build versions of Windows. Cannot complain about that (also, once again, please support developers of tools used by the community, whether this, throttle stop, etc.).

As to what I mean by spyware on LTSC, there is still a ton of telemetry data gathered by microsoft. Sure, I had to remove significantly fewer components, but I still had to modify it to stop the data gathering. Also, you can remove certain components, rather than disabling them in OS, doing regedit, powershell, etc. That means that disabling certain logs won't be necessary because the component that created those in the first place was never installed! No one can turn on silently what isn't there to begin with!
https://www.ntlite.com/wp-content/uploads/screen_components.png
This is an example of what the GUI looks like. After you create your working ISO, it can save your settings like a template to apply to future changes. If you gut Windows update in it, it uses WSUS and I forgot the other one to look up updates each month in the updates tab on the side when you go to make a new image (and yes, you will need to make a new image every month or however often you update). If you cut the ISO like I do, it breaks some cumulative updates because the windows file cannot find the component that needs to be updated, so the update will fail (or you can remove update altogether). In either event, that means you will need to add the updates to a clean ISO, then apply the changes on removed components, feature settings, etc., all over again (which the template from the stable build streamlines). They have an explanation on how to do it quickly on the software website's forum. Then you put the updated ISO onto a thumb drive, then go update your machine.

You mentioned you have done "bash scripts, third party programs, router firewall, group policy." I take it you may have done some registry editing as well, and maybe some powershell action. Basically, you can put in some of that straight from NTLite. This includes setting up services for the ISO, privacy feature settings, etc. As I said, this is a powerful tool. With all the options, it will take you awhile to get everything done correctly (and you may even use NTLite to remove certain live components that cannot be removed until after installed and activated, but that is later and can cause instability, etc., tread as you see fit). So, if you follow someone else's list, like Black Viper's list for services (http://www.blackviper.com/service-configurations/black-vipers-windows-10-service-configurations/), then you can sit down and set those so that any time you use that ISO to install, your services are already set (aside from those added by any post install installations of software). You can add drivers to it, you can setup post installation programs to run, etc.

Now, much of this you can do with DISM or piecemeal. Nothing wrong with that and it is great practice to learn how to do this manually anyways with the official tools. In fact I recommend it. But, due to the volume you would need to learn, starting with NTLite or MSMG and perusing the DISM link above from M$ in your free time (as well as tooling around with it, like just becoming familiar with mounting the ISO, trimming down included versions, and adding drivers and updates to an ISO with DISM), you will get a feel for what is going on quicker. Now you should not remove what you don't understand, but you have the internet and time, then you can really dig in!

In summary, modding ISOs is just the next step in your journey. It builds on what you have already learned, while opening up new options to you that you didn't know before (plus teaches new skills if you ever want to eventually get certs for IT, which isn't my field, I just love tech!). Hope that helps a bit.
 

·
BOINC Cruncher
Joined
·
1,811 Posts
It's funny, people say Linux is too hard, but look at the hoops people jump through just to get Windows to function the way they want and to stop Windows from doing things it shouldn't be doing in the first place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
It's funny, people say Linux is too hard, but look at the hoops people jump through just to get Windows to function the way they want and to stop Windows from doing things it shouldn't be doing in the first place.
Agreed. But I don't think Linux is too hard, in fact I recently was playing with compiling my own kernel with AMD optimizations. It is more the time requirement to learn the command line for terminal, etc. I acquired the knowledge for Windows over decades. Plan on doing the same with Linux, although I estimate needing to change from Windows to Linux in about 4 years.

Reason why, as another mentioned, is SaaS/WaaS. This twice a year update cadence is to prepare users for a twice a year update charge, probably something low like $10-15, similar to the annual $25 update charge apple charges its customers. People fear a monthly fee for use of software they already bought. I think M$ is going to keep the higher cost for acquisition, followed by annual or bi-annual "feature update" charges to consumers. Why 2023? The long-term servicing of Win 7 to volume license customers ends then, Windows 8/8.1 support ends then, and around 2022-23, Office will be completely 365. So we are looking at that year being the convergence point for SaaS at Microsoft (hence time to jump ship and learn Linux for a seamless transition in the next couple years).

With prices of SSDs coming down, I'd recommend to anyone picking up a cheap 128-512GB SSD and throwing Linux on it of some flavor, then just boot onto that SSD every once in awhile to tool around.

But you do have a point, especially with the point where WINE, Proton, etc., is in development for use.
 

·
BOINC Cruncher
Joined
·
1,811 Posts
Agreed. But I don't think Linux is too hard, in fact I recently was playing with compiling my own kernel with AMD optimizations. It is more the time requirement to learn the command line for terminal, etc. I acquired the knowledge for Windows over decades. Plan on doing the same with Linux, although I estimate needing to change from Windows to Linux in about 4 years.

Reason why, as another mentioned, is SaaS/WaaS. This twice a year update cadence is to prepare users for a twice a year update charge, probably something low like $10-15, similar to the annual $25 update charge apple charges its customers. People fear a monthly fee for use of software they already bought. I think M$ is going to keep the higher cost for acquisition, followed by annual or bi-annual "feature update" charges to consumers. Why 2023? The long-term servicing of Win 7 to volume license customers ends then, Windows 8/8.1 support ends then, and around 2022-23, Office will be completely 365. So we are looking at that year being the convergence point for SaaS at Microsoft (hence time to jump ship and learn Linux for a seamless transition in the next couple years).

With prices of SSDs coming down, I'd recommend to anyone picking up a cheap 128-512GB SSD and throwing Linux on it of some flavor, then just boot onto that SSD every once in awhile to tool around.

But you do have a point, especially with the point where WINE, Proton, etc., is in development for use.

Here are the necessary kernel options for booting with Ryzen if that is what your looking for, or I can give you a copy of mine, but it will have options only found in the Gentoo kernel.
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: ajc9988

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Here are the necessary kernel options for booting with Ryzen if that is what your looking for, or I can give you a copy of mine, but it will have options only found in the Gentoo kernel.
Thank you for that. I did get that part right, but had the PSP issue with my 1950X coupled with the driver issue related to my GTX 980 Ti. I compiled with the -O2 flag. Worked fine except those two above issues (and then it stopped loading into the OS after awhile). I switched to using an older vanilla kernel for awhile while tooling with it to fix those issues, but eventually backed off as I had a quad boot setup (reg use Win 10, Benching Win 10, Benching Win 7, and linux distro). With prices of SSDs coming down, I am looking at getting separate drives so that I don't have to deal with the boot loader mess, just telling the MB which drive to load from.

But once again, thank you for that!
 

·
BOINC Cruncher
Joined
·
1,811 Posts
Thank you for that. I did get that part right, but had the PSP issue with my 1950X coupled with the driver issue related to my GTX 980 Ti. I compiled with the -O2 flag. Worked fine except those two above issues (and then it stopped loading into the OS after awhile). I switched to using an older vanilla kernel for awhile while tooling with it to fix those issues, but eventually backed off as I had a quad boot setup (reg use Win 10, Benching Win 10, Benching Win 7, and linux distro). With prices of SSDs coming down, I am looking at getting separate drives so that I don't have to deal with the boot loader mess, just telling the MB which drive to load from.

But once again, thank you for that!

Anytime you change kernel versions you need to reinstall the Nvidia driver for it to produce a new module based on the new kernel.

Using a drive for each OS is best, but watch with Windows 10, its going to install its boot loader on whatever drive is first, as in sata port 0 or nvme 0, regardless of boot order or which drive Windows is installed on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Anytime you change kernel versions you need to reinstall the Nvidia driver for it to produce a new module based on the new kernel.

Using a drive for each OS is best, but watch with Windows 10, its going to install its boot loader on whatever drive is first, as in sata port 0 or nvme 0, regardless of boot order or which drive Windows is installed on.
well that likely explains the Nvidia driver error. I also found the unofficial fix for the PSP issue, but...

And I am aware for Windows. This is why installing it first is usually best, followed by the Linux OS.
 

·
Top kek
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
It's funny, people say Linux is too hard, but look at the hoops people jump through just to get Windows to function the way they want and to stop Windows from doing things it shouldn't be doing in the first place.
To be fair, both are hard if you have to use them to work. But in different ways. Started using 1 year ago Linux (again), and i was kinda still noob with it when i started. For 1 year, you can learn A LOT. Both have their own strengths and weaknesses.

That was, when i quit my previous job, where i worked as a System Administrator, in a hospital with Windows only environment.
 

·
Old to Overclock.net
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
It's funny, people say Linux is too hard, but look at the hoops people jump through just to get Windows to function the way they want and to stop Windows from doing things it shouldn't be doing in the first place.
I know right, I thought having to track down dependencies and libraries was enough of a pain in the butt but this Windows custom iso thing looks like it's on another level. It makes sysadmin'ing a nix system look easy, even most popular distros are on rails now, next, next, update and done wizards. Here I thought I was super slick for using a power shell script slimmed down LTSC build and now I see just how weak my game is in modding Windows...

Is there not like a pre-made community "distribution" or config setup similar to how they have community forks of Firefox like Tor for privacy oriented or Lineage OS for Android which will already be cut and de bloat of almost everything you don't want without having to do it yourself?

Why 2023? The long-term servicing of Win 7 to volume license customers ends then, Windows 8/8.1 support ends then, and around 2022-23, Office will be completely 365. So we are looking at that year being the convergence point for SaaS at Microsoft (hence time to jump ship and learn Linux for a seamless transition in the next couple years).
Yea everything seems to be ending right on and around that date, office, previous versions of Windows, etc. They even cut this years current office suite extended support time so that it coincidences with Office 2016 end of life and all the other MS products.

Anyone who can't see it at this point is blind. They are pushing for full 100% software as a service across all their products. Consumers will get raped more than ever before all while having less control and living in a paid app walled garden.

With prices of SSDs coming down, I'd recommend to anyone picking up a cheap 128-512GB SSD and throwing Linux on it of some flavor, then just boot onto that SSD every once in awhile to tool around
Why not do it the other way around, just boot into Windows when you absolutely cannot do it in Linux. In two years I've only absolutely needed to boot into Windows to get something done a handful of times, a memorable one was when I was trying to place an order on this site that was doing some serious UA finger print discrimination. Unless your UA showed Windows NT/Chrome it figured you were a bot, hacker, spammer, fraudster or whatever and wouldn't let you order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
I know right, I thought having to track down dependencies and libraries was enough of a pain in the butt but this Windows custom iso thing looks like it's on another level. It makes sysadmin'ing a nix system look easy, even most popular distros are on rails now, next, next, update and done wizards. Here I thought I was super slick for using a power shell script slimmed down LTSC build and now I see just how weak my game is in modding Windows...

Is there not like a pre-made community "distribution" or config setup similar to how they have community forks of Firefox like Tor for privacy oriented or Lineage OS for Android which will already be cut and de bloat of almost everything you don't want without having to do it yourself?
It's not as hard as you think it is. Another part of DISM is creating your own image from an active deployment so that you can set it up for deploying your image with preinstalled programs and drivers for a specific build so that offices and OEMs can quickly load the OS and bloatware or specific tools easily. There are even tools for network deployments, but I'm weak in my networking game, so that is a bit beyond me. But capturing a drive image as a WIM and deploying it widely can save TONS of time for IT that need it.

Meanwhile, I've seen fewer custom images of Win 10 than I have seen of Win 7 and XP, where everyone and their sister had a modified version. Why the change, I don't know. But you should check out the NTLite forum on where to start, maybe check out mydigitallife forum, and read up on DISM.

But, it needs noted every deployment scenario is different. Some need networking. Some need Remote Desktop Protocol, some with touchdown spaces. Some need the tools for remote monitoring of client machines. Some need none of that. That is why customization is so important. You can bend and shape the OS to your specific needs, and not a bit beyond that! It would be easy to pull up someone else's work, but with these tools, you can completely remove what you have no need for, including little networking parts that allow for remote monitoring or remote access in the event you don't need it for a specific machine, or modules effecting sync to devices if you don't need to allow offline syncing, syncing of settings to other computers or devices, etc. You have to decide how you use your devices and how you want to use your devices moving forward. You may even discover capabilities of the OS you never used or knew existed. It really is cool.

Also, I always say, never trust an ISO you don't make yourself unless from a trusted vendor (and after the Lenovo firmware debacle a couple years ago, sometimes not even then)! You cannot guarantee a person didn't put in a back door or a keylogger with a dial back for a custom rom and own you from the get go, or put a rootkit in the image and own you for life. Bad news bears, man!

This is why I recommend taking it slow. NTLite is the easiest to learn. Beyond that, the world is your oyster (but you'll have to fish for it)!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
The people saying Linux is hard probably aren't the same people modding Windows 10, they're likely just using vanilla 10 and complaining about it or in total bliss and don't notice how bloated it is. That sort of person usually doesn't know or care enough to be bothered by having certain choices taken away or having certain functions and software forced onto their machine.



If Vulcan had like an 80% adoption rate there's a good chance I'd be on Linux now.
 

·
Master of Black Snow
Joined
·
19,338 Posts
I have to say that I rather like the O&O ShutUp 10 setup. Green checkmarks for rec'ed disabling of features, Yellow Triangles for moderately rec'ed and Red Exclamations for Pro use disabling of Win 10 settings. All the green were immediately checked and I will take a wait and see approach to the Yellow feature listings. If something bugs me it's disabled. :)

~Ceadder :drink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
I have to say that I rather like the O&O ShutUp 10 setup. Green checkmarks for rec'ed disabling of features, Yellow Triangles for moderately rec'ed and Red Exclamations for Pro use disabling of Win 10 settings. All the green were immediately checked and I will take a wait and see approach to the Yellow feature listings. If something bugs me it's disabled. :)

~Ceadder :drink:

Glad it helped.
I do the same thing but backwards. Use all recommended and somewhat recommended preset from the drop down then I go through and manually hit OneDrive and the remaining update services. Unless you do that there's a good chance it will still update on your during a reboot which I've had happen.

If something hinders my use I'll go back and turn it on but so far that's never happened. The handful of things left need to be left alone to keep normal functionality.


Just remember managing updates it YOUR job now haha.
 

·
MegaTechPC
Joined
·
19,215 Posts
What does that even mean... If anything "people" are likely more accustomed to XP or 98 than they are any mobile OS given that mobiles OS's as you know them have been around +/- 10-15yrs only. Unless by "people" you mean 15yr olds or post-2000's kids. It's very likely that most "people" have more seat time on non mobile traditional layout OS's.
It means that the AVERAGE person spends about a billion times more, well, TIME on mobile OS's these days than they do on their PC's, and that's been the case for quite a while now. It doesn't matter how much experience people have had with Windows in the past; most of them today have a smart phone on them at all times and use it constantly from the time the wake up to the time they go to bed. The average person (and I stress AVERAGE) probably knows how to use Windows (or MacOS depending on preference) well enough to be considered a casual user, yet could probably be considered expert or super users of their favorite smartphone OS, be it Android or iOS, just due to the sheer amount of time they spend throughout the day d/ling apps, interacting with social media, customizing layouts, etc. Every single "normie" that I interact with on a daily basis constantly has their nose in their phones literally every second they are not doing anything else, yet barely ever use their PC's or laptops (if they even own one, which many do not). This is why I stressed "AVERAGE" because any of us here on OCN are absolutely NOT who I was referring to.

Hell, even I probably spend more raw hours on my phone/tablet during a regular day than I do on a PC, and I spend a lot more time on my PC than the average person does. I suppose one caveat to be considered here would be the average work-usage of regular people on a PC, but in my experience that usage is typically confined to a small subset of individual work-related applications that people tend to have a rote-like knowledge of, but that does not contribute much in the way of learning about Windows/MacOS themselves (unless of course your field itself is in the computer sciences arena).
 

·
Master of Black Snow
Joined
·
19,338 Posts
Glad it helped.
I do the same thing but backwards. Use all recommended and somewhat recommended preset from the drop down then I go through and manually hit OneDrive and the remaining update services. Unless you do that there's a good chance it will still update on your during a reboot which I've had happen.

If something hinders my use I'll go back and turn it on but so far that's never happened. The handful of things left need to be left alone to keep normal functionality.


Just remember managing updates it YOUR job now haha.
Yeah I disabled OneDrive also. I have 5 SSD and a 4Tb WDBlack. I don't require Cloud solutions. :cool:

~Ceadder :drink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
It means that the AVERAGE person spends about a billion times more, well, TIME on mobile OS's these days than they do on their PC's, and that's been the case for quite a while now. It doesn't matter how much experience people have had with Windows in the past; most of them today have a smart phone on them at all times and use it constantly from the time the wake up to the time they go to bed. The average person (and I stress AVERAGE) probably knows how to use Windows (or MacOS depending on preference) well enough to be considered a casual user, yet could probably be considered expert or super users of their favorite smartphone OS, be it Android or iOS, just due to the sheer amount of time they spend throughout the day d/ling apps, interacting with social media, customizing layouts, etc. Every single "normie" that I interact with on a daily basis constantly has their nose in their phones literally every second they are not doing anything else, yet barely ever use their PC's or laptops (if they even own one, which many do not). This is why I stressed "AVERAGE" because any of us here on OCN are absolutely NOT who I was referring to.

Hell, even I probably spend more raw hours on my phone/tablet during a regular day than I do on a PC, and I spend a lot more time on my PC than the average person does. I suppose one caveat to be considered here would be the average work-usage of regular people on a PC, but in my experience that usage is typically confined to a small subset of individual work-related applications that people tend to have a rote-like knowledge of, but that does not contribute much in the way of learning about Windows/MacOS themselves (unless of course your field itself is in the computer sciences arena).
That is the thought. Problem is IT'S WRONG! People like what is familiar. They don't want their computer to be like their phone. They want their computer to be like the computer they used 10 years ago, like the computer they sit down to at work, etc.

This is why people fight the updates, because it breaks app/program compatibility, it changes the interface, etc. They don't want that. That is why corporations have pushed off switching from Win 7 in part, why they pushed off going to 7 from XP, why they haven't wanted to touch Win 8 (which was the worst performing OS and most shaped like a phone UI), and why they haven't wanted to touch Win 10. These "feature updates", mostly, are nothing the average user gives two poos about.

Just because something seems logical does NOT mean it is right! People fight change, unless it is SOOO bad that they will do anything for it. Instead, Win 10 is really bad, but wasn't as bad as Win 8 (win 8.1 was OK compared to 8, but...).
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: Blameless

·
Master of Black Snow
Joined
·
19,338 Posts
That is the thought. Problem is IT'S WRONG! People like what is familiar. They don't want their computer to be like their phone. They want their computer to be like the computer they used 10 years ago, like the computer they sit down to at work, etc.

This is why people fight the updates, because it breaks app/program compatibility, it changes the interface, etc. They don't want that. That is why corporations have pushed off switching from Win 7 in part, why they pushed off going to 7 from XP, why they haven't wanted to touch Win 8 (which was the worst performing OS and most shaped like a phone UI), and why they haven't wanted to touch Win 10. These "feature updates", mostly, are nothing the average user gives two poos about.

Just because something seems logical does NOT mean it is right! People fight change, unless it is SOOO bad that they will do anything for it. Instead, Win 10 is really bad, but wasn't as bad as Win 8 (win 8.1 was OK compared to 8, but...).
So much THIS!

The only reason I went with 10 is because M$oft refuses to support Windows all the way back to XP.

HATED Vista.
Adopted 7 Ultimate. Really loved that OS and its features.
Avoided 8 and 8.1 though my bro got conned into 8 by M$oft India Tech Support when I was out of town for a couple years as he was on OEM and he replaced our Mother's system with his using her OS. All he had to do was call the automated line and answer questions. That's it. Easy peasy. Nope he dials up tech support for his new system and they tell him "sorry you need 8.0 if you don't contact your OEM"

Simply irritating.

Between that and lack of Ultimate I just went for Home 64bit retail. I will not support M$oft's cash grab schemes.

All because I got latest CPU while my bro is running Win7 on his Ryzen 1700x. I would do same with mine but OMFNGG I would put a brick through my monitor if I had to sit through M$oft's constant nagging about lack of update support. :mellowsmi

~Ceadder :drink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
I haven't used 7 on a newer machine but I'm 99% sure I'd figure out how to either prevent the nagging or break/remove the update assets so it couldn't so that anymore. Actually I'm pretty sure I once made a copy of 7 with MSMG that had the updates I wanted installed and the update thing removed.
 

·
Vermin Supreme 2020
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
TFW when most people aren't reading far enough to see

for WoW only.

MS isn't going to do anything worthy enough of a return for anyone besides folks on ancient systems, playing ancient games, who likely can't upgrade due to hardware limitations.
 

·
Old to Overclock.net
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
yet could probably be considered expert or super users of their favorite smartphone OS, be it Android or iOS, just due to the sheer amount of time they spend throughout the day d/ling apps, interacting with social media, customizing layouts, etc.
but that does not contribute much in the way of learning about Windows/MacOS themselves (unless of course your field itself is in the computer sciences arena).
So using work programs does not make you an expert at Windows but using social media apps makes you a power user of mobile OS's? That kind of contradicts itself... Using social media and spending your time 24/7 glued to your phone is about the farthest qualifier for being an Android or iOS "super user".

If you cannot mount "/" you are definitively not an Android superuser. :D See how many people pick up on that one...

I'm curious to see what happens with Win 7 EOL which is scheduled within a year. Enterprise use is still scheduled for another three years after that, will there be some unofficial patch/port of the enterprise updates that home users will be able to use to keep the OS updated?

Is 7 going to go down the XP path where everyone declares that they will ride it out forever and then bails or will it actually have forever hold outs? I'm tempted to believe most people will eventually crack like they did with XP, running an out of date OS is a good way to get owned (then again most people do exactly just this with their Android smartphones) but things might be different this time around.
 
61 - 80 of 93 Posts
Top