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Discussion Starter #1
This seemed like a good place to post this!

On that note lets begin! Just ordered up some fancy new parts from PCCS to redo my loop and do a little bit of a general overhaul on my computer. So heres the thing. I went outright for performance only on my initial set up of my rig. Let me just say it looks pretty vanilla, well atleast in my eyes. With that said its basicly all black and blue, minimal lighting. BUT my motherboard, ASUS X79 Deluxe has this UGLY ASS gold anodized heatsinks. Right......I know. But with the upgrade I'm keeping with the black and blue but plan on adding in some white for accents. Yes I'm doing quite a bit more than that as well.

Enough of my life story, I just figured a brief explanation as to what I was trying to do was in order. And I like to tinker so I'm planning to change the anodizing on the heatsinks myself. The things you can learn to do on the internet these days!!!! As I've never done this myself and as easy as it is to watch youtube videos etc I still have a few questions I'd like to ask if anyone has done this or attempted this themselves!

Thanks in advance for adding to my collection of plethora knowledge!
 

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You're not anodizing, you're re-anodizing.

Anodizing the the chemical hardening of the surface of aluminum. During the anodizing process it is possible to cause color changes.

You can't "re-anodize" though. You have to remove the original anodized layer and then anodize the newly exposed aluminum. The original anodizing can be remover either physically (sanding/grinding/machining,etc.) or chemically (sodium hydroxide for example, which reverses the anodizing process).

More uTube looking (probably the worst place in the world to get any kind of advice) or take the parts to a professional anodizing shop (get a quote?)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was planning on using Lye to remove the original anodizing. I talked to a couple of local shops on the phone. Didn't get a quote but they all pretty much informed me itd be fairly expensive as they mainly deal with larger batches.

I basicly wanted to try something different and it appeared to be a fairly simple and cheap process to attempt myself.

If I do attempt to do this myself is where I had a couple questions. Alot of places I seen basicly said if its not in direct sunlight to use clothing dye as its cheaper but has no UV protection. Also, once I make my dye, lets say I use a mason jar. Could I seal that jar when I'm done using it and save it for another potential project. Or does it become unusable at that point?
 

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I believe that there are various specific chemicals that you can add to the anodizing solution to make various colors.
Food color would work, but they are not made to be permanent. Maybe Rit dye?


You should run some testing to learn how the process works and things like voltages/curremts, chemical concentrations, time frames, cleaning/washing procedures, etc. That way you'll have a pretty good idea of what to expect before you subject your parts to the process.


No, I'd be very leery of sealing a glass jar full of powerful chemicals.
 
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