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Discussion Starter #1
I just received an older switch. Although it's older it's an enterprise switch (HP ProCurve 1810G-24). I currently have several switches around my office that are NetGear ProSafe 8 Gb Switches.

Would there be any advantage to moving my entire network onto a single switch? How will performance be impacted?

Also, if you have any resources you think it would be worth reading to learn more about efficiency of switches that would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance!
 

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No, your not going to see a performance impact. Unless, for some strange reason your current switches are defective or you have mixed Fast Ethernet and Gigabit switches.

Is there anything that your current network is not doing for you? Do you need a managed switch to set up VLANs, link aggregation, bandwidth management, etc.?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
With about 5 users working off of one of the switches their terminals each see a significant network speed drop.

They are all connected to one switch along with a printer that switch is then conntected to two more switches before it reaches the router. On the switch closest to the router, there is also a surveillance camera with a steady stream (medium quality).

From your answer, I understand that I need to check if I am mixing switches (Fast Ethernet vs. Gigabit Switches) and then check if there is a defective switch in there.

How do I calculate the maximum throughput of a network switch and then do the math? I've never had formal training and only need some terms to start searching for. I can do my own research, but I keep running into pages selling switches and nothing about the science or the calculations.

Thanks beavo!
 

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You SHOULD get a speed bump from using the HP ProCurve 1810G-24. Chaining multiple switches together is going to slow things down for two reasons.
1. having to go through multiple devices is going to add latency, this is minuscule in an environment like yours, but best practice suggests against doing it anyways.
2. while you may have a gigabit link to each computer, if you have two 16 port gigabit switches with 15 users on each, and a single gigabit connection between the two, you're going to hit a bottleneck because there is only a gigabit link between the two, therefore all 15 users on each end are fighting for that 1Gb of bandwidth.
there can also be problems with switches auto negotiating between other switches, as you are (by the book) supposed to use a crossover cable between switches, and other stupid rules that USUALLY dont matter.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thans Bazinga!

I searched using crossover cables between switches and I found the resources I need! How to effectively setup a multi-switch network. I really appreciate the help. I will do this tonight and let you know how it works.

-Peter
 

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I thought you had the HP switch? is it not practical to use it? she single HP switch SHOULD be the best solution if possible.
Personally I do use multiple switches myself because it is more practical for most of what I do, but when I can I will use one single nice switch.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazinga69 View Post

You SHOULD get a speed bump from using the HP ProCurve 1810G-24. Chaining multiple switches together is going to slow things down for two reasons.
1. having to go through multiple devices is going to add latency, this is minuscule in an environment like yours, but best practice suggests against doing it anyways.
2. while you may have a gigabit link to each computer, if you have two 16 port gigabit switches with 15 users on each, and a single gigabit connection between the two, you're going to hit a bottleneck because there is only a gigabit link between the two, therefore all 15 users on each end are fighting for that 1Gb of bandwidth.
there can also be problems with switches auto negotiating between other switches, as you are (by the book) supposed to use a crossover cable between switches, and other stupid rules that USUALLY dont matter.
Speed bump in what manner?

No offense to the OP, but if somebody is asking this question, they are not going to notice any performance impact.

What "by the book" are you referencing? Auto-MDIX is part of the Gigabit specs. You actually have to work hard at it to disable it.

I'm assuming this is a home environment. Unnecessary complexity is unnecessary. I'm sorry if I am misunderstanding something.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by r11 View Post

With about 5 users working off of one of the switches their terminals each see a significant network speed drop.

They are all connected to one switch along with a printer that switch is then conntected to two more switches before it reaches the router. On the switch closest to the router, there is also a surveillance camera with a steady stream (medium quality).

From your answer, I understand that I need to check if I am mixing switches (Fast Ethernet vs. Gigabit Switches) and then check if there is a defective switch in there.

How do I calculate the maximum throughput of a network switch and then do the math? I've never had formal training and only need some terms to start searching for. I can do my own research, but I keep running into pages selling switches and nothing about the science or the calculations.

Thanks beavo!
In what way are the users seeing "significant" network speed drop off?

Please explain the issue in its entirety because the problem usually ends up being either not an actual problem or something else entirely when somebody admits that they have little or no knowledge.

Switch throughput and switching capability are normally listed in the tech specs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavo451 View Post

Speed bump in what manner?

What "by the book" are you referencing? Auto-MDIX is part of the Gigabit specs. You actually have to work hard at it to disable it.

I'm assuming this is a home environment. Unnecessary complexity is unnecessary. I'm sorry if I am misunderstanding something.
I'm assuming that there is one or two resources on one of the switches, and multiple clients attempting to reach them from one of the other switches, competing for that gigabit link between the two switches, so switching over to one single nice switch with enough ports would bring the bottleneck to the speed of the link at the resource, instead of the link between switches.

while auto-MDIX is a part of gigabit, the proper way to do things (Per Cisco) is to use a crossover between switches (although I have never found it necessary)

Considering he said 5 users terminals, I believe that it is a small business
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazinga69 View Post

I'm assuming that there is one or two resources on one of the switches, and multiple clients attempting to reach them from one of the other switches, competing for that gigabit link between the two switches, so switching over to one single nice switch with enough ports would bring the bottleneck to the speed of the link at the resource, instead of the link between switches.

while auto-MDIX is a part of gigabit, the proper way to do things (Per Cisco) is to use a crossover between switches (although I have never found it necessary)

Considering he said 5 users terminals, I believe that it is a small business
It's funny that you say Cisco because all of their stuff comes with Auto-MDIX enabled and you have to go through the CLI to disable it. I remember reading blog posts about how turning off Auto-MDIX in Cisco switches was having issues and not working properly with crossover cables.
 

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"The auto-MDIX feature is enabled by default on switches running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SE or later."

I'm saying that crossover is the proper way to connect two switches, not that it is the way it has to be done.
In fact, I usually avoid crossover cables unless necessary because of the possibility of somebody who doesn't know better connecting an end device through a crossover cable.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazinga69 View Post

"The auto-MDIX feature is enabled by default on switches running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SE or later."

I'm saying that crossover is the proper way to connect two switches, not that it is the way it has to be done.
In fact, I usually avoid crossover cables unless necessary because of the possibility of somebody who doesn't know better connecting an end device through a crossover cable.
And that's just it. In what way are you defining "proper"? You said per Cisco. BUT even you just reinforced that crossovers are not used by default in Cisco equipment.

When you use the word "proper", it implies that every other method is "improper". Especially when you can say that the "proper" method on gigabit is to use straight cables with Auto-MDIX.
 

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Ontopic: You'll benefit from a single switch because multiple gigabit source streams won't have to be "narrowed" down to a single gigabit port to traverse to another switch to reach the WAN on another host on the network.
Quote:
Originally Posted by beavo451 View Post

And that's just it. In what way are you defining "proper"? You said per Cisco. BUT even you just reinforced that crossovers are not used by default in Cisco equipment.

When you use the word "proper", it implies that every other method is "improper". Especially when you can say that the "proper" method on gigabit is to use straight cables with Auto-MDIX.
The proper way to use a crossover cable is with like devices or when connecting a computer and router together. Using a crossover cable is better practice than relying on auto-mdix to figure out what's going on.

Does Bazinga need a disclaimer in their signature stating that all opinions are their own and should be taken with factual information to make an informed choice?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post

The proper way to use a crossover cable is with like devices or when connecting a computer and router together. Using a crossover cable is better practice than relying on auto-mdix to figure out what's going on.

Does Bazinga need a disclaimer in their signature stating that all opinions are their own and should be taken with factual information to make an informed choice?
Again, "proper" is defined by whom?

Yes crossover cables was proper in the 90s with Fast Ethernet. There was no other way to do it.

"Proper" is not a matter of opinion. Had he said "better", I would have just given my opinion. However, since he is asserting a fact, I would like to see the basis for it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavo451 View Post

Again, "proper" is defined by whom?

Yes crossover cables was proper in the 90s with Fast Ethernet. There was no other way to do it.
Proper is defined by the industry. You need to know when to use a crossover cable to get those questions right on most Cisco certification exams.

Fast Ethernet had nothing to due with whether a cable needed to be crossover or not.

Using the proper/correct type of cable is the best way to do things and how it's done in industry.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavo451 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post

The proper way to use a crossover cable is with like devices or when connecting a computer and router together. Using a crossover cable is better practice than relying on auto-mdix to figure out what's going on.

Does Bazinga need a disclaimer in their signature stating that all opinions are their own and should be taken with factual information to make an informed choice?
Again, "proper" is defined by whom?

Yes crossover cables was proper in the 90s with Fast Ethernet. There was no other way to do it.

"Proper" is not a matter of opinion. Had he said "better", I would have just given my opinion. However, since he is asserting a fact, I would like to see the basis for it.
Here is a screen shot from cisco's current introduction to networking book needed to pass the CCENT exam.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazinga69 View Post

Here is a screen shot from cisco's current introduction to networking book needed to pass the CCENT exam.
Yes that defines the types of cables. Where does it say that the signal crossing in the cable is more correct than occurring in the device?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post

Proper is defined by the industry. You need to know when to use a crossover cable to get those questions right on most Cisco certification exams.

Fast Ethernet had nothing to due with whether a cable needed to be crossover or not.

Using the proper/correct type of cable is the best way to do things and how it's done in industry.
Oh yes Fast Ethernet and Ethernet has everything to do with it as there was no provision for auto sensing ports. So, the only way to connect them was to either use a crossover port or a dedicated up link port with the pins cross internally.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavo451 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazinga69 View Post

Here is a screen shot from cisco's current introduction to networking book needed to pass the CCENT exam.
Yes that defines the types of cables. Where does it say that the signal crossing in the cable is more correct than occurring in the device?
well, next to the types of cables, under the application column, it says when to use them...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavo451 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post

Proper is defined by the industry. You need to know when to use a crossover cable to get those questions right on most Cisco certification exams.

Fast Ethernet had nothing to due with whether a cable needed to be crossover or not.

Using the proper/correct type of cable is the best way to do things and how it's done in industry.
Oh yes Fast Ethernet and Ethernet has everything to do with it as there was no provision for auto sensing ports. So, the only way to connect them was to either use a crossover port or a dedicated up link port with the pins cross internally.
Fast ehternet can do auto-MDIX, doesn't mean it's always going to work perfectly, same with gigabit, doesn't always work.
 
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