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Discussion Starter #1
On Friday, we discovered that Waymo, the self-driving Google spinoff, has been granted a permit to operate as a Transportation Network Company in the state of Arizona. This means that it can launch an official ride-hailing service and start charging customers for their journeys. It also confirms the findings of a recent report that put Waymo at the front of the autonomous vehicle pack, meaning my colleague Tim Lee was right when he said the launch of a commercial operation by Waymo in Arizona was imminent.
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Discussion Starter #4
I would have thought that many would be more excited about this? No love for Arizona I guess. Is it because it's in the south area? :p.. Has google thought about the security behind the car? I mean, if it's driverless, what makes them think that no one will steal it?
 

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Vandelay Industries
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I would have thought that many would be more excited about this? No love for Arizona I guess. Is it because it's in the south area? :p.
Sry to be off topic, but is that a thing? I know it's a thing over here on the east coast, but was/am unaware of it being a thing out west.
 

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Senioritis Member
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I would have thought that many would be more excited about this? No love for Arizona I guess. Is it because it's in the south area? :p.. Has google thought about the security behind the car? I mean, if it's driverless, what makes them think that no one will steal it?
I don't trust anything from Google. Also, one has to have a smartphone to use the service; I don't have (or even want) one (unless someone wants to pay for the phone and the monthly data plan for me).

Sry to be off topic, but is that a thing? I know it's a thing over here on the east coast, but was/am unaware of it being a thing out west.
AZ Governments are very friendly to the driverless car companies, unlike CA who drove them out by regulating them to death.
 

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Hey I get one of these!
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I would have thought that many would be more excited about this? No love for Arizona I guess. Is it because it's in the south area? :p.. Has google thought about the security behind the car? I mean, if it's driverless, what makes them think that no one will steal it?
No company that I am aware of would have their employee attempt to defend something from being stolen unless that itself is their actual job. All of them would prefer the employee stay safe, and call the cops after. Given the shear level of connections this thing would need to have along with all the sensors and cameras, identifying the thieves should be easier than relying on an eye witness either way. Also being driverless should allow for better vehicle lockdowns as it is effectively monitored 24/7, unlike humans who need to sleep.

As for the driverless aspect... Na, I'm good. I'll let them use this to improve driverless cars as a whole, then in probably 5-7 years when I'm looking for a new car maybe I'll be able to buy one that lets me nap on the way to work.
 

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Overclocker
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Can't wait for the sprayed on lines that lead to a ditch and driverless cars crashing :p etc. But hey the perfect Arizona roads that are simple American roads for AI to deal with.
Would I trust a stupid AI with my life, hell no. They can market the safety all they want until it gets used on common roads and situations not just the perfect American dry roads, plus the whole hijacking and other malicious acts thing that you won't get much in US either, launch it in poor countries and you will see the plethora of ways people will exploit it for benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No company that I am aware of would have their employee attempt to defend something from being stolen unless that itself is their actual job. All of them would prefer the employee stay safe, and call the cops after. Given the shear level of connections this thing would need to have along with all the sensors and cameras, identifying the thieves should be easier than relying on an eye witness either way. Also being driverless should allow for better vehicle lockdowns as it is effectively monitored 24/7, unlike humans who need to sleep.

As for the driverless aspect... Na, I'm good. I'll let them use this to improve driverless cars as a whole, then in probably 5-7 years when I'm looking for a new car maybe I'll be able to buy one that lets me nap on the way to work.
Well, that's the thing, apparently these things aren't connected to the internet because they can be easily hacked. I am talking about the physically being stolen because car jacking has become such a big thing that I am sure people will try to car jack these cars too.

https://readwrite.com/2017/01/11/google-waymo-security-tl4/

Google’s self-driving division, Waymo, has revealed that its cars receive limited internet access to minimize the window for hackers to penetrate the system.

“Our cars communicate with the outside world only when they need to, so there isn’t a continuous line that’s able to be hacked, going into the car,” said Waymo CEO John Krafcik to the Financial Times. “When we say that our cars are autonomous, it’s not just that there’s not a human driver, but also that there is not a continuous cloud connection to the car.”
I don't trust anything from Google. Also, one has to have a smartphone to use the service; I don't have (or even want) one (unless someone wants to pay for the phone and the monthly data plan for me).



AZ Governments are very friendly to the driverless car companies, unlike CA who drove them out by regulating them to death.
They are in everything from your phone and the search engine. Google is far more trustworthy at the moment than most other companies I know. They at least provide basic level of protection.

Sry to be off topic, but is that a thing? I know it's a thing over here on the east coast, but was/am unaware of it being a thing out west.
No idea. That's why I brought it up. I am surprised that Arizona got it first before anyone else.
 

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...They are in everything from your phone and the search engine. Google is far more trustworthy at the moment than most other companies I know. They at least provide basic level of protection...
You are making some bad assumptions. I don't have a smart phone, I don't use Google for my search engine, and I sure as heck don't use Chrome. Even Google ads don't affect me since I got fed up with intrusive, obnoxious ads and now use an ad blocker.

...I am surprised that Arizona got it first before anyone else.
It all has to do with politics and greed. They were in CA first and pulled out because of CA's excessive regulation and taxation. AZ was the most accommodating of all the other locations they were working in (which, frankly, comes as a shock to me since our Governor, legislature, etc. are pretty much useless).
 

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Hey I get one of these!
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Well, that's the thing, apparently these things aren't connected to the internet because they can be easily hacked. I am talking about the physically being stolen because car jacking has become such a big thing that I am sure people will try to car jack these cars too.
I mean, people can put your car on blocks and take the tires and radio in minutes. Not a lot stopping someone who really wants to do it, human or AI.
 
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