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The Belgian Gaming Commission has determined that randomized loot boxes in at least three games count as "games of chance," and publishers could therefore be subject to fines and prison sentences under the country's gaming legislation.
A statement by Belgian Minister of Justice Koen Geens (machine translation) identifies loot boxes in Overwatch, FIFA 18, and Counter Strike: Global Offensive as meeting the criteria for that "game of chance" definition: i.e., "there is a game element [where] a bet can lead to profit or loss and chance has a role in the game."

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So EA pisses off the world, and then gets everyone else in trouble while staying out of it themselves :mad:
 

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AMD Overclocker
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Yay, less freedom!!!

Wait... :rolleyes:
 

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Not sure whether this is a good or a bad thing.
technically its a good thing for consumers, but its relatively bad for everything else.
next they should hit DLCs and microtransactions, then we could all say that the game community is doomed to fall. :drunken:
 

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technically its a good thing for consumers, but its relatively bad for everything else.
next they should hit DLCs and microtransactions, then we could all say that the game community is doomed to fall. :drunken:
How is it bad for everything else? DLCs and microtransactions are completely different than loot boxes where you don't know what your'e going to get. This was strictly based on the fact that loot boxes are absolutely identical to slot machines in that it is 100% a game of chance where you don't know what you're buying. Their intention is to get you to keep buying it over and over again until you get what you want instead of just being able to buy what you want in the first place.
 

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I've been wondering for years how spending money to get X, Y or Z out of a "loot crate" isn't gambling, cosmetic or not. It's literally a digital slot machine.

I don't have any problems with cosmetic items and would rather not see any game devs get in trouble for it. I feel this could be a step in the right direction but these laws never end well.
 

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How is it bad for everything else?
IMHO, I think it will push the publishers to break apart the base game into microtrans and DLC even more. Loot boxes proved to be a good money maker. Companies usually don't sit by and let revenue streams disappear.

For people who didn't care about LB's and could actually see the actual ROI on loot boxes, leaving them in was fine, as it didn't necessarily mean the devs would break a game up to make more money. It was an acceptable evil in my book. I feel this decision will be a worst evil.
 

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How is it bad for everything else? DLCs and microtransactions are completely different than loot boxes where you don't know what your'e going to get. This was strictly based on the fact that loot boxes are absolutely identical to slot machines in that it is 100% a game of chance where you don't know what you're buying. Their intention is to get you to keep buying it over and over again until you get what you want instead of just being able to buy what you want in the first place.
because it actually restricts not just these randomized purchasable boxes?

the issue revolves around compulsion loops that involves money which inadvertently causes a person to spend more than necessary.
this would inevitably lead to affecting more benign things like "chance" boosters or ingame aids in general, thus the end of microtransactions.

this for example is in wiki's loot box criticism entry.
Some commentators expressed concern that for these types of loot box models to be successful for the publishers, the game itself has to be designed around promoting and encouraging the player to purchase loot boxes, which fundamentally impacts core game design principles and may weaken the underlying game mechanics.[41][42] This may include the use of loot boxes as a means to bypass the need to grind missions repeatedly to get gameplay-changing items that significantly help towards completing a single-player game, which drives players to use real money to purchase these to avoid the time sink. For example, Middle-earth: Shadow of War has a second, true ending requiring the player to gain many more stronger allies to meet its higher difficulty. While the developers playtested the balance of the game without the loot box system activated, assuring the game could be completed without additional monetisation, reviewers found that the game required a great deal of time needed to complete numerous additional missions for the chance to acquire stronger allies, and with the consistent presence of the in-game market for loot boxes, made it difficult to avoid the allure of paying real-world money to bypass this grinding, creating a negative on the overall experience.[43][44] The presentation of a storefront within a game which allows one to use real-world funds to purchase loot boxes or other equipment can also impact the sense of immersion a player has with a game.[45] In April 2018, the developers of Shadows of War announced their plan to remove loot boxes from the game by May 2018, stating one reason for their removal was that "simply being aware that they are available for purchase reduces the immersion in the world".[46]
this leads us to the issue, at which point the term "loot box" is even the main issue and not the "pay-to-win" justification?
 

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Can you sell the stuff you get in loot boxes from overwatch. The definition they gave says profit or loss. The results of the loot box are not a profit or loss if you can't do anything with them. I mean i'm not opposed to them regulating lootboxes. I don't think they should be banned but I think there should be better communications and disclosures for parents to help keep kids from going nuts. And for adults that spend their forture on them...well i dont know.
 

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technically its a good thing for consumers, but its relatively bad for everything else.
next they should hit DLCs and microtransactions, then we could all say that the game community is doomed to fall. :drunken:
I hope they hit DLC and microtransactions under the same umbrella since the gaming companies will be forced to give you, you know, a complete game!!
 

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Gaming went mass market many years ago, so in a world of superabundance of offers, there will also always be a superabundance of crap - both when it comes to the actual games and also the corporate shenanigans surrounding them, that's never going away, but as always the industry has the tendency to go overboard in their "profit maximization techniques", which is what happened here. A minimum of decorum is needed. As to the actual solution, it may need some polishing here and there, but the industry needed to be sent a signal to cut it out. Now, of course they'll try to recoup the losses somewhere else and try to at least keep the same income going, so it's up to everybody to keep paying attention to whatever other dubious stuff they may come up with.

Anyway, here is some naive logic that only works for a few select good guys, but they could try implementing some of it:

1. Make a complete game;
2. If the game proves to be good, consider making proper expansions;
3. And / or a sequel;
4. And also, come up with new ideas now and then instead of milking every last drop out of franchises (the term "franchise" already talks to the over commercialization of games to the detriment of making something actually creative, fun and interesting).


I don't have any illusion that mass market chewing gum style gaming will continue to be what it is right now for the most part and that the above ideals only work for select developers and communities and even then it's always a hard balancing act, so the best we can do when it comes to the mass market is try to keep things minimally sane.
 

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I don't have a problem with loot boxes, if you want to spend money for a skin, be my guest. What are we trying do here? Stop people from spending their own money, only because we don't approve of what they wish to spend their money on.

Also, loot boxes aren't like slot machines, you're not guaranteed to win anything when playing a slot machine.
 

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I don't have a problem with loot boxes, if you want to spend money for a skin, be my guest. What are we trying do here? Stop people from spending their own money, only because we don't approve of what they wish to spend their money on.

Also, loot boxes aren't like slot machines, you're not guaranteed to win anything when playing a slot machine.
You're quite out of the loop. Been on vacation on Gilligan's Island for a while?
 

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What if they remake the loot boxes? They call it support box, and each box will gives in game currency everytime. As a support for purchasing the 'support box', they throw in the slots as a freebie. They can say they are just selling in game currency, the slots are a gift, nothing to do with the puchase.
 

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This is a step in the right direction. Hopefully the EU and other countries expand on this to protect young kids from gambling loot crates/boxes in video games. Publishers like Valve know damn well what this is doing kids, yet they don't do a damn thing about it.
 
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