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With all this talk about L1 & L2 prefetcher off netting higher performance, how do you guys feel about CPPC off? There's a lot of information floating around /r/amd & various threads on overclock.net that turning off CPPC can result in ~7-9% better multi-core performance and frame stability (0.1% & 1% lows) at the cost of ~2% single core due to Windows 11's scheduler causing core/thread contention by throwing everything into the best cores.

I'd be curious to know if L1 + L2 prefetcher off & CPPC off results in overall better performance than both prefetchers & CPPC set to on / default.
 

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With all this talk about L1 & L2 prefetcher off netting higher performance, how do you guys feel about CPPC off? There's a lot of information floating around /r/amd & various threads on overclock.net that turning off CPPC can result in ~7-9% better multi-core performance and frame stability (0.1% & 1% lows) at the cost of ~2% single core due to Windows 11's scheduler causing core/thread contention by throwing everything into the best cores.

I'd be curious to know if L1 + L2 prefetcher off & CPPC off results in overall better performance than both prefetchers & CPPC set to on / default.
I am afraid that Single core performance is horrible with this tip.....
And Single core performance, this is what i am looking for, prior to Multi Core performance.
 

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My best scores ever until now with my 24/7 settings (in sig), my little "220 PPT" and my lovely H115i RGB Platinum. L1 + L2 HW Prefetcher disabled

test @ 21°C - 22°C :
Screenshot Font Computer Rectangle Operating system
Computer Screenshot Font Personal computer Electronic device


I like a lot the SC score ;)
 

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Nice ! Also, did you try the CPPC off setting ?
I started and saw that my SC score would be very low....Only after some seconds test.

Can you confirm this low SC score with CPPC off ?
 

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I started and saw that my SC score would be very low....Only after some seconds test.

Can you confirm this low SC score with CPPC off ?
Keeping in mind that I reverted back to Win 10 Pro from 11 Pro...yes, CPPC off results in single-core worse, multi-core perhaps a bit better, but with margin of error per run.
 

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Setting x2APIC with 3950X BIOS 3801 is fully deactivating CPPC (firmware implementation) including the CPPC Energy Preference hint.
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There are two settings in the BIOS. One is "CPPC" and the other is "CPPC Preferred Cores".
The first one informs the OS about the NUMA layout of the CPU, so that the OS can group the threads of a process on the cores that have faster access to the common cache.
The second one additionally informs the OS about the "performance potential and efficiency" of each core, and causes the OS to prioritize certain cores for most workloads.
If you disable the first one, the second one will be disabled too.
If you disable the first one, you will usually get lower framerates in videogames, and lower scores in any multicore benchmark that uses less cores than one CCX.
If you disable the second one, you will usually get mostly the same framerates in videogames, but a smoother gaming experience, because the "Preferred cores" feature is known to cause core workload contention in videogames, where the OS allocates too many tasks on one or two cores only while the other cores are left free.
By disabling the second setting, the OS doesn't know anymore which of your cores is the fastest, and so any single core benchmark will most probably be lower because the OS will place the benchmark loop on a random core instead of using the fastest one.
So, if you want to get smoother framerates in videogames you may want to disable "CPPC Preferred cores" only, but you will loose peak single core performances and score.
I can't think of any advantage in having both "CPPC" and "CPPC Preferred cores" disabled.
 

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There are two settings in the BIOS. One is "CPPC" and the other is "CPPC Preferred Cores".
The first one informs the OS about the NUMA layout of the CPU, so that the OS can group the threads of a process on the cores that have faster access to the common cache.
The second one additionally informs the OS about the "performance potential and efficiency" of each core, and causes the OS to prioritize certain cores for most workloads.
If you disable the first one, the second one will be disabled too.
If you disable the first one, you will usually get lower framerates in videogames, and lower scores in any multicore benchmark that uses less cores than one CCX.
If you disable the second one, you will usually get mostly the same framerates in videogames, but a smoother gaming experience, because the "Preferred cores" feature is known to cause core workload contention in videogames, where the OS allocates too many tasks on one or two cores only while the other cores are left free.
By disabling the second setting, the OS doesn't know anymore which of your cores is the fastest, and so any single core benchmark will most probably be lower because the OS will place the benchmark loop on a random core instead of using the fastest one.
So, if you want to get smoother framerates in videogames you may want to disable "CPPC Preferred cores" only, but you will loose peak single core performances and score.
I can't think of any advantage in having both "CPPC" and "CPPC Preferred cores" disabled.
Indeed we can see CPPC as the Intel HWP
CPPC also has a 0 to 255 byte value Energy hint in MSR register
 

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There are two settings in the BIOS. One is "CPPC" and the other is "CPPC Preferred Cores".
The first one informs the OS about the NUMA layout of the CPU, so that the OS can group the threads of a process on the cores that have faster access to the common cache.
The second one additionally informs the OS about the "performance potential and efficiency" of each core, and causes the OS to prioritize certain cores for most workloads.
If you disable the first one, the second one will be disabled too.
If you disable the first one, you will usually get lower framerates in videogames, and lower scores in any multicore benchmark that uses less cores than one CCX.
If you disable the second one, you will usually get mostly the same framerates in videogames, but a smoother gaming experience, because the "Preferred cores" feature is known to cause core workload contention in videogames, where the OS allocates too many tasks on one or two cores only while the other cores are left free.
By disabling the second setting, the OS doesn't know anymore which of your cores is the fastest, and so any single core benchmark will most probably be lower because the OS will place the benchmark loop on a random core instead of using the fastest one.
So, if you want to get smoother framerates in videogames you may want to disable "CPPC Preferred cores" only, but you will loose peak single core performances and score.
I can't think of any advantage in having both "CPPC" and "CPPC Preferred cores" disabled.
Also the difference in cores plays a part, If you have a big spread - ex a two ccx cpu, R9 x900X or x950X with gold and bronze bin - you will potentially lose more SC performance.
But if you have a nice 5600X, 5800X/3D and all cores hit max boost, then preferred cores makes little sense.
 

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Hello guys! Sorry for bothering you with those kind of questions...but can someone tell me if it is worth it to upgrade from a BIOS 3302? Are there any performance gains for 5950X?

Thank you and have a nice day! :)
 

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Hello guys! Sorry for bothering you with those kind of questions...but can someone tell me if it is worth it to upgrade from a BIOS 3302? Are there any performance gains for 5950X?

Thank you and have a nice day! :)
If you are satisfied with 3302, keep it.
If you need a Bios ready for windows 11 with same kind of performances than 3302, then go to 3801.

all bioses after 3801 have a particular behavior which makes the max Vid=1,425V (instead of 1,5V) when EDC > 140Amps.
Depending on your silicon, cooling, temps, voltages, CO curves, etc, you will loose performances either single core or multi core versus 3302 or 3801 with same settings.
 

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There are two settings in the BIOS. One is "CPPC" and the other is "CPPC Preferred Cores".
The first one informs the OS about the NUMA layout of the CPU, so that the OS can group the threads of a process on the cores that have faster access to the common cache.
The second one additionally informs the OS about the "performance potential and efficiency" of each core, and causes the OS to prioritize certain cores for most workloads.
If you disable the first one, the second one will be disabled too.
If you disable the first one, you will usually get lower framerates in videogames, and lower scores in any multicore benchmark that uses less cores than one CCX.
If you disable the second one, you will usually get mostly the same framerates in videogames, but a smoother gaming experience, because the "Preferred cores" feature is known to cause core workload contention in videogames, where the OS allocates too many tasks on one or two cores only while the other cores are left free.
By disabling the second setting, the OS doesn't know anymore which of your cores is the fastest, and so any single core benchmark will most probably be lower because the OS will place the benchmark loop on a random core instead of using the fastest one.
So, if you want to get smoother framerates in videogames you may want to disable "CPPC Preferred cores" only, but you will loose peak single core performances and score.
I can't think of any advantage in having both "CPPC" and "CPPC Preferred cores" disabled.
As usual, good stuff !...reminds me a bit of 'Process Lasso' which I use on my older TR 2950X in conjunction with specific uma/numa settings possible on that specific TR. I haven't seen the need for it on the two CH8 setups yet, but a real-world good test for the general 'single core' stressing is FS2020 4K Ultra and its somewhat atrocious optimizations.
 

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There are two settings in the BIOS. One is "CPPC" and the other is "CPPC Preferred Cores".
The first one informs the OS about the NUMA layout of the CPU, so that the OS can group the threads of a process on the cores that have faster access to the common cache.
The second one additionally informs the OS about the "performance potential and efficiency" of each core, and causes the OS to prioritize certain cores for most workloads.
If you disable the first one, the second one will be disabled too.
If you disable the first one, you will usually get lower framerates in videogames, and lower scores in any multicore benchmark that uses less cores than one CCX.
If you disable the second one, you will usually get mostly the same framerates in videogames, but a smoother gaming experience, because the "Preferred cores" feature is known to cause core workload contention in videogames, where the OS allocates too many tasks on one or two cores only while the other cores are left free.
By disabling the second setting, the OS doesn't know anymore which of your cores is the fastest, and so any single core benchmark will most probably be lower because the OS will place the benchmark loop on a random core instead of using the fastest one.
So, if you want to get smoother framerates in videogames you may want to disable "CPPC Preferred cores" only, but you will loose peak single core performances and score.
I can't think of any advantage in having both "CPPC" and "CPPC Preferred cores" disabled.
So, any other option in bios we should disable in order to win some Cinebench points ? 😂😆
 

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Could do this this evening @20°C :

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Hello guys! Sorry for bothering you with those kind of questions...but can someone tell me if it is worth it to upgrade from a BIOS 3302? Are there any performance gains for 5950X?

Thank you and have a nice day! :)
No, don't worry about the newer BIOSs, they have no tangible positive effect on anything. I also use 3302, and a 5950x, and I post scores as good as the second best in this thread, as 32xxx in cinebench r23 is one hell of an achievement, but I score between 30500 and 30930 depending on temperature.
 
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