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I have a budget pc that I built about a year ago that has an FM1 socket.
I started with an A6-3500 tri-core CPU, which is 2.1 GHz out of the box. About a week ago, I discovered that I had software that could be used to OC it, and I cranked it up to 3 GHz with no issues.

Just yesterday I received an Athlon II X4 651k quad-core CPU that I had been wanting for some time because it's supposed to be easy to OC, and I figured I should easily be able to get it to 4 GHz since it's 3 GHz out of the box and I had so much success with my other CPU. However, the second I hit 3.3 GHz with this thing my PC black screens and the whole system restarts. My mobo is an ASRock A55M-VS (Micro-ATX) and I have 8 GB of 1600MHz RAM (soon to be 16 GB 1866 MHz RAM).
It is worth noting that I bought an aftermarket heatsink for this CPU, but it doesn't fit on my Micro-ATX mobo, so for the time being I'm using the stock heatsink.
What is the issue here? Is there any way I can get this to 4 GHz so that it can be relatively on-par with other CPUs? If the heatsink is a problem, what is a good aftermarket heatsink that will fit on a Micro-ATX mobo in a Micro-ATX case?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldNinja View Post

I have a budget pc that I built about a year ago that has an FM1 socket.
I started with an A6-3500 tri-core CPU, which is 2.1 GHz out of the box. About a week ago, I discovered that I had software that could be used to OC it, and I cranked it up to 3 GHz with no issues.

Just yesterday I received an Athlon II X4 651k quad-core CPU that I had been wanting for some time because it's supposed to be easy to OC, and I figured I should easily be able to get it to 4 GHz since it's 3 GHz out of the box and I had so much success with my other CPU. However, the second I hit 3.3 GHz with this thing my PC black screens and the whole system restarts. My mobo is an ASRock A55M-VS (Micro-ATX) and I have 8 GB of 1600MHz RAM (soon to be 16 GB 1866 MHz RAM).
It is worth noting that I bought an aftermarket heatsink for this CPU, but it doesn't fit on my Micro-ATX mobo, so for the time being I'm using the stock heatsink.
What is the issue here? Is there any way I can get this to 4 GHz so that it can be relatively on-par with other CPUs? If the heatsink is a problem, what is a good aftermarket heatsink that will fit on a Micro-ATX mobo in a Micro-ATX case?
You truly didn't tell us anything important, like:

What's the motherboard? Or better: All of the PC specs?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldNinja View Post

Is there any way I can get this to 4 GHz so that it can be relatively on-par with other CPUs?
The CPU is unlikely to get to 4GHz (3.5-3.7GHz would be average) and that motherboard will blow up before you even get to 3.5GHz, it's designed to be barely adequate for running that Athlon stock without exploding a MOSFET. You have a budget motherboard with a 4-phase CPU power delivery, a cheap power phase design and no VRM heatsink, it has practically no chance of handling an overclocked quad-core.

If you want better performance, you should sell what you have and get something like a Haswell i3 (4160 is a good choice) alongside a cheap 1150 mobo, it's a decent upgrade over that thing. FM1 has been dead for years and even overclocked, that Athlon stands no chance against the old Phenom II, much less Vishera or something like an i3/i5. Hell, I think even G3258 would run circles around it. Getting an aftermarket cooler or 16GB of RAM for an FM1 processor in this day and age is a waste of money, especially considering the price of DDR3.

Basically, upgrade the CPU and motherboard if you can afford it. If you can't, undervolt the CPU to make sure VRM temps are kept under control and upgrade when you can afford it. Either way, upgrade, investing in what you have right now is like setting your money on fire and watching it burn.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldNinja View Post

I have a budget pc that I built about a year ago that has an FM1 socket.
I started with an A6-3500 tri-core CPU, which is 2.1 GHz out of the box. About a week ago, I discovered that I had software that could be used to OC it, and I cranked it up to 3 GHz with no issues.

Just yesterday I received an Athlon II X4 651k quad-core CPU that I had been wanting for some time because it's supposed to be easy to OC, and I figured I should easily be able to get it to 4 GHz since it's 3 GHz out of the box and I had so much success with my other CPU. However, the second I hit 3.3 GHz with this thing my PC black screens and the whole system restarts. My mobo is an ASRock A55M-VS (Micro-ATX) and I have 8 GB of 1600MHz RAM (soon to be 16 GB 1866 MHz RAM).
It is worth noting that I bought an aftermarket heatsink for this CPU, but it doesn't fit on my Micro-ATX mobo, so for the time being I'm using the stock heatsink.
What is the issue here? Is there any way I can get this to 4 GHz so that it can be relatively on-par with other CPUs? If the heatsink is a problem, what is a good aftermarket heatsink that will fit on a Micro-ATX mobo in a Micro-ATX case?
Mini ITX and Micro-ATX are big fails for overclocking. Especially with AMD cpu's.
 

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Looks like 3+1 VRM and no cooling at all on the fets. Overclocking that thing is asking for serious trouble--as in early New Year's fireworks kind of trouble. Even if the chip could make it to 4 GHz, that motherboard can't get it there. It's only rated for 100W CPU's, and the 651K is a 100W CPU at stock. It is a decent overclocker, but only on high-end FM1 motherboards.

You got away with it on the A6-3500 because that chip was only a 65W chip to begin with, and it was clocked so low that I doubt it even came close to 65W most of the time. Even at 3 GHz, it probably drew less power than the 651K does at stock.

If you want to run that 651K overclocked, you'll need to find a better FM1 board on the secondary market. You could try putting some heatsinks directly on the fets and pointing a fan at them, but even at that, you're not going to get enough of an OC to justify the time and expense. All it might do is get you 3.3 stable.
 
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