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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I've installed some small out-the-box water cooling solutions in the past for some friends but never assambled one of my own. In a few months I'm going to build a new PC and I'll try to make it huge. Dual XEON, at least 24GB of DDR3 RAM, PCI-E SSD HDD + RAID 1 SATAIII HDDs and triple SLI and of course I'll want to use water cooling in it.

My biggest problem is that NONE of those parts are found here in my Country so I'll have to import everything so I can't have the luxury to order something wrong or less than what I'll need.

I would like to start planning on the cooling system and, as stated above, I have no idea of how to build one myself. My main problem comes with the fittings and tubing diameters. I've made a diagram of what I think could work using something like this pump/radiator combo with two PMP-450S pumps. Am I too far off from reality? Could something like this work?

I've made every split considering the volume of fluid being divided in equals so there's no increase/decrease in speed and no bottlenecks but all this in theory of course. Maybe you guys with more experience than me can help me figure this out?

The components being cooled are:
  • 2 x XEON CPUs
  • 2 x SET OF 3 RAM MODULES EACH (6 modules in total)
  • 2 x SATA HDDs
  • 3 x NVIDIA GTX 580
I'll welcome every thought.

Cheers!

EDIT: Now that I think it thru, splitting from 1 x 1/2" to 4 x 1/4" gives me the same AREA... not the same VOLUME. Should I change every 1/4" fitting/tube to 3/8" instead? This part is confusing me -.-
 

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I would advise against water cooling your HDD's and RAM. RAM blocks are EXTREMELY restrictive and RAM never gets all that hot anyway. I have never heard of HDD's getting overly hot and just a few fans set at slow speeds will cool your RAM and HDD's just fine.

If you run your CPU's and your GPU's in parallel, one pump should be way sufficient.
 

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Thanks PepeLapiu.

You are probably right about the HDDs (never had problems with temperature in HDDs before) but not sure about RAM tho. I've seen quite some modules completely burned out due to excesive OC'ing. I'm not saying that I would OC in extreme but, why not be sure about it? I mean, these modules seem appropiate (heatsink easily removable) and paired with these RAM "blocks" seem like a good deal.

Again, I could be mistaken as the enthusiasts-like water cooling systems I've installed don't have these, but I would like for sure that it's a pain in the a** and that it will bring me more problems than solutions before I discard them.

About having a single pump, it sounds perfect but I wouldn't like to "cascade" my VGAs or CPUs (instead of having a separate line for each component) and using splitters like in the diagram, I can have a line for each component straight-ish from the pumps. The problem with having only one pump for so many components (this is what I don't know for sure) is that splitters won't let me split a 1/2" hose into more than 4 1/4" tubes.

According to my math, the volume for each tubing/splitter (using 1 as the value of the 1/2" volume) is 0.25 so a splitter with a 1/2" intake will serve 4 x 1/4" tubes perfectly without adding or dropping pressure or speed.

Again, this is pure math but in real life it can be different (splitters being in 90° angle causing friction, the body of the splitters with too much area, etc.) and that's where I need correction.

In the meantime, I'll work in a new diagram without the HDDs to see what I come up with.
 

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Like Pepe said, there is no need to WC the HDD. In fact, it will probably be detrimental since HDDs optimal temperatures are 30-45C.

RAM does not need WCing. Each module uses less than 5w and some heatspreaders are sufficient.

Besides, more blocks => more fittings => more leak points.
 

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You are making it way too complicated for yourself, way more then it needs to be.
Today's very efficient RAM will never need to be more then fan cooled unless you are some sort of world extreme OCer. But with 24 GB of RAM, there is no need ever to OC that.

A fan trained on the RAM sticks will be more then enough ..... invest in some fancy heat spreaders if you want.

If you go the WC way with the RAM, it should be strictly for aesthetic reasons. An at great cost of restriction and flow reduction in your loop.

Also, there is no need to do any sort of math about splitting and tube sizes. Just split your 1/2" into 3 1/2" tubes and that will do just fine.

But when running parallel blocks in a loop, keep in mind that your flow will have to be fairly sufficient. With 3 GPU blocks in parallel, I would recommend at least 1.5 GPM of flow so that each GPU gets a good 0.5 GPM of coolant each. You might even try to aim at somewhere near 2 GPM but you won't get that with a mobo block slowing down your flow, even with 2 pumps in there.

If you want to keep your mobo block, I recommend doing it in parallel with your CPUs or it will kill the flow of your entire loop.

But when it comes to mobo blocks, that also should be an aesthetic decision with great cost to the rest of your loop
 

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I do agree with you wanting to run a dual loop setup, though I'm questioning the splitters. If you use splitters, make sure to only use one per loop, or you run the risk of backflow or further restriction on one of the ports of the splitter.

I'd suggest running each loop in series, but you can run the GPUs in parallel. I'm not completely sold on liquid cooling RAM, though it does look nice in some instances. I'm also not sold on HDD cooling, unless it's in this, which just looks sexy!
 

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sorry about the last post of mine ..... i just realised you are not planning on a mobo block ..... oooops!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi guys,

Quote:


Originally Posted by PepeLapiu
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You are making it way too complicated for yourself, way more then it needs to be.
Today's very efficient RAM will never need to be more then fan cooled unless you are some sort of world extreme OCer. But with 24 GB of RAM, there is no need ever to OC that.

A fan trained on the RAM sticks will be more then enough ..... invest in some fancy heat spreaders if you want.

If you go the WC way with the RAM, it should be strictly for aesthetic reasons. An at great cost of restriction and flow reduction in your loop.

Also, there is no need to do any sort of math about splitting and tube sizes. Just split your 1/2" into 3 1/2" tubes and that will do just fine.

But when running parallel blocks in a loop, keep in mind that your flow will have to be fairly sufficient. With 3 GPU blocks in parallel, I would recommend at least 1.5 GPM of flow so that each GPU gets a good 0.5 GPM of coolant each. You might even try to aim at somewhere near 2 GPM but you won't get that with a mobo block slowing down your flow, even with 2 pumps in there.

You're right. Took RAM and HDD out of the figure. The pump I'm looking at gives 4.6 GPM so that's no problem there. The math part is becouse I work in the Oil & Gas industry and I've seen how pipes that were supposed to last 20 years get holes in just 2 years or less because of the wrongly calculated speeds, friction, clogin, etc. and I'm not even talking about not delivering on one end what you're trying to pump on the other end


Quote:


Originally Posted by DuckieHo
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Besides, more blocks => more fittings => more leak points.

Never even thought about that... good point

Quote:


Originally Posted by Angrybutcher
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I do agree with you wanting to run a dual loop setup, though I'm questioning the splitters. If you use splitters, make sure to only use one per loop, or you run the risk of backflow or further restriction on one of the ports of the splitter.

I'd suggest running each loop in series, but you can run the GPUs in parallel. I'm not completely sold on liquid cooling RAM, though it does look nice in some instances. I'm also not sold on HDD cooling, unless it's in this, which just looks sexy!

I made a new diagram with just one loop but I'm still using 2 splitters as I need to get the flow back toghether. This time I have 2 x 1/4" plus 1 x 3/8" and that is aaaaaaaaalmost the same volume fighting so I think there's shouldn't be any backflow. I'm still yet to find some sort of backflow valve for this... any clues?

I've taken out one pump and now it's only CPUs in parallel and VGAs in serial. How badly do you guys think the 2nd and 3rd VGAs temps can raise? Would it be too serious/dangerous?

I've also added (against DuckieHo's advice) a couple of quick connectors, a drain valve and added the radiator I took from the second loop (how worthless can it be?).

Thanks again

 

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I am not aware of any possible need for a filter inside your loop .... I didn't even know you could get a filter for a WC loop!

It's your loop and you should build it your way but here is how I would build it:

pump and rads > splitter > CPU's in parallel > splitter > GPU's in parallel
With only one pump. perhaps a good pump like a 35x, the most popular and reliable out there.

Here is just about the best thing you could get for 3 cards in parallel:
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10...22&id=bDUCCgjx
 

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Adding a filter to a loop allows you to use dyes without worrying about it. Aquacomputer makes a filter with a couple of balls valves so it can be cleaned without draining the loop.
 

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I think this is what I would do. In the second loop, make note of the fitting placement on the GPUs.

The QDCs can be used as drains pretty easily, but you may still add a drain if you wish.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eviang;14162827
EDIT: Now that I think it thru, splitting from 1 x 1/2" to 4 x 1/4" gives me the same AREA... not the same VOLUME. Should I change every 1/4" fitting/tube to 3/8" instead? This part is confusing me -.-
There is no needs to vary your tubing sizes.

So you have a pump pushing 2 GPM into a 1/2" tube and into a Y fitting. That Y fitting forks into two 1/2" tubes. Each goes into separate CPU blocks.

So you want your coolant to distribute equally over both CPU's right? Well don't worry, with all 1/2" tubing, it will spread itself equally over both CPU's. Hard to explain but that's just how it works. In a parallel loop with both CPU blocks being the sime size, the most restrictive component will still be your CPU blocks and by their restrictive nature, they will spread the flow to each other equally.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Eviang
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Hi guys,

You're right. Took RAM and HDD out of the figure.

RAM and HDD water cooling is purely eye candy. If you want the eye candy, I would say do it. If you do not, I'd say remove them too.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Eviang
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Thanks for your comments guys. I've redesigned everything (even changed the PC components) to avoid even a single splitter but I did read in other places about how good is having two pumps in the same loop so... here it is. Do you think it will work?

Thanks again for everything



Hey dude!

First of all, what you have there is basically two loops sharing the same reservoir.

Here is what I have to offer you:
Your CPU puts out around 100 Watts of heat ..... actually I am guessing because that's what my 2600k puts out.

Your 3 cards probably put out way over 500 Watts of heat at stock under load.

Research it, and look it up, I am just guessing that's what they all put out for heat but my figures of 100 W for the CPU and 500 W for the VGAx3 shouldn't be too far off.

But never the less, you have 3 GPU's that put out 5 times more heat yet they have the same radage as the CPU ... what up homes?

I wish Martin would come in and clarify because at this point, I still believe in parallel is the way to go, especially for 3 cards like that.

And I wasn't going to say anything, but you did good to drop a CPU. Unless you run a server, dual CPU's would have been pretty much a waste of money.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Quote:


Originally Posted by PepeLapiu
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Hey dude!

First of all, what you have there is basically two loops sharing the same reservoir.

Here is what I have to offer you:
Your CPU puts out around 100 Watts of heat ..... actually I am guessing because that's what my 2600k puts out.

Your 3 cards probably put out way over 500 Watts of heat at stock under load.

Research it, and look it up, I am just guessing that's what they all put out for heat but my figures of 100 W for the CPU and 500 W for the VGAx3 shouldn't be too far off.

But never the less, you have 3 GPU's that put out 5 times more heat yet they have the same radage as the CPU ... what up homes?

I wish Martin would come in and clarify because at this point, I still believe in parallel is the way to go, especially for 3 cards like that.

And I wasn't going to say anything, but you did good to drop a CPU. Unless you run a server, dual CPU's would have been pretty much a waste of money.

Thanks again Pepe,

I know about the oversized rads. I'm considering 1 triple for the VGAs and the other one single 120 just for the CPU.

The in-line double pump (despite the extra risks of leaking) are to prevent a drop in the pressure. Does it make sense?

The double CPU idea was for rendering 3D and video and setting up several virtual machines at the same time mostly but with these 3 VGAs the rendering problem is mostly solved and I guess I'll have to deal with just 12 processors for the virtual machines part.
 

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I guess it really depends what you'll be doing. If you're going to be doing heavy load on the CPU only, keep dual loops with a 360 in each. If you'll mainly be rendoring utilizing the tri GPUs, you may find better temps if you do a single loop with both 360's, using the pumps in serial.
 

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I sorta agree with Angry here but I think you should go for a single loop no matter what you use your machine for.

You usually put your CPU under load, or your GPU's .... but rarely do you put both under load at the same time.

So whenever your CPU is under load, you really would prefer to have all your rads in your CPU loop, no?
Same when your GPU's are under load, you would rather move all your rads to the GPU loop, correct?

Well if both your CPU and GPU's are in the same loop, whatever is under load at the moment always gets all the radage to cool it as best as possible.

So you are playing a game with your GPU's pushed to the limit. That's when you really wish you had all your rads in your GPU loop while your idling CPU doesn't really need to be cooled.

Well, if you have all your rads in the one loop, the GPU's get all the radage when needed in gaming and the idling CPU is just along for the ride.

Makes sense?
 
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