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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be trying my first custom loop. All hardline tubing. Single 280 mm Corsair radiator mounted in the front with two QL140 fans. These are low speed fancy RGB 140mm fans that only run at 1250 RPM. It's going in a NZXT Elite H510 case. I'll be cooling a 2080Ti and 9700k, both being overclocked so I suspect it's going to pump out a ton of heat. The question is whether I should pull air from in the case and have it exhaust out the front or take clean air in from outside and pump the heat into the case. Obviously pumping in 500w of heat into the case is not the most ideal, but I am thinking that if I try to take the air from inside the case and pump that through the radiator, it's going to result in increased coolant temp because the air coming into the radiator will hotter from inside the case than outside.

What do you think?
 

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The 510 has rear exhaust and top fan mounting so draw cold air in, case has filters so shouldn't be a problem with dust either
 

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IMO you will not have enough RAD surface area. With a single RAD you would need 3000 plus rpm fans, even then I think you would have a hard time cooling both the cpu and gpu. You can always try and see what the results are.

I am firmly entrenched in the all RADs in camp.
 

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Bad case and waaaay too small radiator surface for your components,especially OC ed ,it will run very hot or very loud . I'd get a new case and an extra rad . Or just stay on air.
 

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I'm going to be trying my first custom loop. All hardline tubing. Single 280 mm Corsair radiator mounted in the front with two QL140 fans. These are low speed fancy RGB 140mm fans that only run at 1250 RPM.
The main advantage of water cooling is increased cooling capacity & reduced acoustics. With the proposed setup, you are spending more money for likely similar performance of an air cooled setup. I disagree with the comments about "not enough rad" in the context of requirements. The 280mm radiator will dissipate that heat without your components over heating. That being said... it's not advised (due to cost / effort of what you are proposing).

It's going in a NZXT Elite H510 case. I'll be cooling a 2080Ti and 9700k, both being overclocked so I suspect it's going to pump out a ton of heat.
For reference, I ran a 3930k & GTX 780 (380w combined TDP) on a single 360mm radiator with 3 SP120's at approx. 1200 rpm. Cooling performance was fine but I would of preferred more rad. I was just limited on budget. You can check my build logs for stats if curious. Delta varied between 15 to 30c based on load, OC etc.

Second, due to the construction of radiators (dense arrangement of copper / aluminium fins), you should optimize your fan selection for static pressure.

You can see fan spec comparison here:

QL140 specs vs. SP 120 specs

EDIT: As you can see, the SP120s, a smaller and cheaper fan (half the cost) performs a bit better. That being said, Corsair fans are not that good. I'm not too knowledgeable on the best fans (performance / noise) but others can chime in here. I'd be looking at something like this Noctua NF-P14s redux-1500 PWM based off a quick google search.

Cheaper than the Corsair LED fans you've selected, better performance, and similar dBA... :)

The question is whether I should pull air from in the case and have it exhaust out the front or take clean air in from outside and pump the heat into the case. Obviously pumping in 500w of heat into the case is not the most ideal, but I am thinking that if I try to take the air from inside the case and pump that through the radiator, it's going to result in increased coolant temp because the air coming into the radiator will hotter from inside the case than outside.

What do you think?
Given the context, 280mm radiator for two components, you should try to follow the rule of thumb before solving your direction of air flow.

120mm radiator per component + extra 120mm radiator.

If you are limited in radiator size and you're concerned with the stability of other components (Motherboard), ensure you have additional fans to provide fresh air to those components. Finally, you can just pick a direction that is most suitable for where your case will be located.

If you had more rad surface area, it would not be as critical to identify the additional fans but you're walking a fine line here...

To summarize, I advise the following following:

1. Increase radiator size.
2. Revise case if increased radiator size is not feasible.
3. If 1 & 2 are not followed, ensure you have additional fans for other components (motherboard etc.)

Hope this helps
 

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A single 240 radiator only in push at no more then 1250 rpm's? I don't think it'll matter exhaust or intake, that's no where near enough radiator space and even if it was that's not even close to enough fan power.
 

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sorry, there is a long laundry list of things that are wrong.

that corsair rad is just a rebranded HWL 280GTS:


just slightly higher than your fan speed (let alone accounting that the review used better fans - noctua leaf blowers) will give you enough for one of the two blocks (cpu/gpu). fwiw, i have the EK CE 280 ([3770k]4.6/1.28v -[980ti bios modded 360watts] 1480/1.27v) - and i had to replace the 1.6K vadar fans with noctua 3K fans to not struggle at keeping a 10c (or less) water delta while gaming.

i highly suggest looking at a bigger rad with better (faster!) fans which will mean using another case.
 

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Agree with others. While it could be done in that case, you'd be better off grabbing a case better suited for multiple rad mounting so you can also take advantage of lowered acoustics and not have to run RPMs as loud on the radiator fans.
 

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I agree with the prior posts. I also like push/pull arrangements. The rad size is your biggest issue. The 120/140mm per component in loop with and additional 120/140mm is a tried and true standard. Allows for not only cooling the components, but the additional heat the OCs you mentioned will put out. Static pressure is the best measure of a fan in combination with a radiator. I shy away from RGB for my radiators, as many lack good static pressure. Filters are a must, but be prepared to break your loop down to change the fluid and dust the inside of your case at regular intervals. Dust is the enemy. Clean the filters regularly too. I always have the heat go out of the case from the rads and the cool air into the case and over the components. Ambient temp of the room is the best gauge of how low you can go. If the air starts off warm, it hard to get the components cooler than that.

Edit: I forgot to mention how I figure out how many intake fans I need. I usually go with the size of the rads. If the rad is 360, I use 3 (as a minimum) or 4 120mm fans. This allows me to figure my case needs. This is the hard part. Finding a case with the ability to have the intake flow and ability to put in a large enough radiator. In one case I have two 480mm rads in push/pull and have 11 intake fans. Yes it is a large case, but that is what you need based on the number of components you are cooling. In the case I am cooling 3 780Tis on one loop and the motherboard, CPU and RAM on the other. Temps are great and have always been. Time for an upgrade though.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I am currently running a 1080Ti overclocked and I am cooling it with an H80iV2 and a single 2000 RPM fan. It does a great job and it's less than half the size of the radiator I bought. I feel like I could connect a 2080Ti to it and still be fine and it's a fair bit smaller than the 280 I got.

Attached is a photo of my current build and the temps have been perfectly fine.

I could add another 120mm radiator to the back or top of the case. I am not sure if the back of the case or the top would be better for a 120mm extra rad.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
We are just giving you our experience, this is your build, build it as you like.
The trick thing is if I add a second radiator, finding a place for the pump and figuring out how to route the tubes. That's been the hardest so far-trying to come up with a plan to route the tubes in a way that looks nice.
 

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The trick thing is if I add a second radiator, finding a place for the pump and figuring out how to route the tubes. That's been the hardest so far-trying to come up with a plan to route the tubes in a way that looks nice.
Welcome to the club
 

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assuming you're removing the exhaust from inside your case, it's pretty much always best to feed your radiators external air.

i'd personally stay on air with what you're proposing. needs more rad.

i highly doubt that radiator will be able to dump 500w of heat, even at full thermal load or whatever you wanna call it (max hotness at max airflow and pump flow)

you have to also account for the temp of inside of your case. i've pretty much always had the best results with feeding external air + exhausting the chamber.
 

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The trick thing is if I add a second radiator, finding a place for the pump and figuring out how to route the tubes. That's been the hardest so far-trying to come up with a plan to route the tubes in a way that looks nice.
This is the key take-away.

What is your goal? Performance, acoustics, aesthetics? A combination of these factors?

There is no doubt it my mind a single 280mm raditator will handle your setup. It just the $ per cooling performance is a bit steep with 1 radiator. Factor in the pump, piping, fittings, etc. and you're spending a lot of money for similar performance and likely acoustics, of an air cooler.

If you're OK with this, that is fine. Not here to judge. Just ensure you have additional fans to provide cool air to your other components. Some blocks for GPUs don't cover all components. Not to mention your motherboard, especially if you're overclocking, will need cooling. I'm a bit rusty with my terminology but I believe the North and South bridge generally dissipate the most heat on the mobo.

Looking at the case you've selected, its also very restrictive on air flow. All glass; Minimal ventilation.

The front, unless I am missing something here... does not have any means of allowing intake.


Everything looks sealed up. Potetnially there is a minimal gap at the edge of the frame but that is a LOT of resistance. Not to mention, if that is where your radiator is going to be located, you will have to push the minimal air that is coming in, through more resistance (fins).

If you examine the bottom, there is only one intake:


And this is where your power supply unit is located. So any air that is "intaked" here, will be pulled through your PSU fan and pushed out the back of the PSU.

Then lets examine the top:



The only solution you can accomplish with this case is to fit your 280mm radiator in the front elevation. Deal with the two layers of restriction as previously mentioned, then either exhaust from the top (single 120mm / 140mm vent) or the rear (single 120mm / 140mm vent.)

If you put an additional 120/140mm radiator, you'll have to use it as an exhaust cause man... you will need at least 1 fan at minimum to push some air in there or you're going to have a bad time. The only solution I can see is this:

Blue = Intake;
Red = Exhaust;
Green = Radiator.

Just be aware that the bottom of your motherboard and any component in there will be quite warm. And unfortunately, a radiator up top will likely clash with the motherboard due to tolerances from the photo (extreme tight).

So I would use a 120mm/140mm radiator in the rear which will pull in warm air from the first radiator or fresh air from the top intake.

------------------------------------------

So you have to understand our skepticism with your build.

Restrictive case. Less than recommended amount of radiator. Looks like a bad time to me.

For reference - you can see in how I handled 380w TDP of heat with a single radiator in the spoiler image below. That was when I had a 250w GTX 780. I sold it a couple years ago and I now have an aircooled, GTX 1060. And my 3930k is exclusively cooled with the 360mm radiator. Silent. Cool... airflow. :)

 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
This is the key take-away.

What is your goal? Performance, acoustics, aesthetics? A combination of these factors?

There is no doubt it my mind a single 280mm raditator will handle your setup. It just the $ per cooling performance is a bit steep with 1 radiator. Factor in the pump, piping, fittings, etc. and you're spending a lot of money for similar performance and likely acoustics, of an air cooler.

If you're OK with this, that is fine. Not here to judge. Just ensure you have additional fans to provide cool air to your other components. Some blocks for GPUs don't cover all components. Not to mention your motherboard, especially if you're overclocking, will need cooling. I'm a bit rusty with my terminology but I believe the North and South bridge generally dissipate the most heat on the mobo.

Looking at the case you've selected, its also very restrictive on air flow. All glass; Minimal ventilation.

The front, unless I am missing something here... does not have any means of allowing intake.


Everything looks sealed up. Potetnially there is a minimal gap at the edge of the frame but that is a LOT of resistance. Not to mention, if that is where your radiator is going to be located, you will have to push the minimal air that is coming in, through more resistance (fins).

If you examine the bottom, there is only one intake:


And this is where your power supply unit is located. So any air that is "intaked" here, will be pulled through your PSU fan and pushed out the back of the PSU.

Then lets examine the top:



The only solution you can accomplish with this case is to fit your 280mm radiator in the front elevation. Deal with the two layers of restriction as previously mentioned, then either exhaust from the top (single 120mm / 140mm vent) or the rear (single 120mm / 140mm vent.)

If you put an additional 120/140mm radiator, you'll have to use it as an exhaust cause man... you will need at least 1 fan at minimum to push some air in there or you're going to have a bad time. The only solution I can see is this:

Blue = Intake;
Red = Exhaust;
Green = Radiator.

Just be aware that the bottom of your motherboard and any component in there will be quite warm. And unfortunately, a radiator up top will likely clash with the motherboard due to tolerances from the photo (extreme tight).

So I would use a 120mm/140mm radiator in the rear which will pull in warm air from the first radiator or fresh air from the top intake.

------------------------------------------

So you have to understand our skepticism with your build.

Restrictive case. Less than recommended amount of radiator. Looks like a bad time to me.

For reference - you can see in how I handled 380w TDP of heat with a single radiator in the spoiler image below. That was when I had a 250w GTX 780. I sold it a couple years ago and I now have an aircooled, GTX 1060. And my 3930k is exclusively cooled with the 360mm radiator. Silent. Cool... airflow. :)

The air intake for the front fans is on the side and bottom. The bottom and right side of the case is open. It's just not easily visible in the photos you posted. But there is about 50^in2 of open inlet area between the bottom and right side for intake to the front two fans. I was planning on using the top fan as an exhaust actually. The entire back of the case is made from open mesh sheet metal so the top fan should be able to draw air in from the bottom. Also, there is no north bridge and south bridge anymore. That's super outdated tech. I think they stopped doing that around 3rd gen CPUs, 3570k and sorts. For years the memory controller now exists on the CPU and the there is still an I/O controller, south bridge of sorts, but it's way more efficient now than in the past. They dont get that hot. Maybe 55C during heavy use.

The main goal of the build is silent operation and looks. I could mount a 240 or even another 280 on top of the case instead of a 120 in the back, but the issue is the top of the case only has open holes for one 140mm fan, so half of the radiator would be blocked. So I am not sure how much better that would be than just going with a 120mm on the back.

I am using the Corsair waterblock for my 2080Ti. Not sure how good it is, but it had pads on the block to cover all the VRM and the MOSFETs.

I am curious if there is value in water cooling the VRMs. I did a bit of Googling and it seems the answer is no unless I am doing insane amounts of overclocking like 1.55v+, which I am not.
 

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A glass hotbox as a computer case, what could go wrong.
I was actually going to post exactly the same, but was going to add in "with too little rad and poor performing fans".

@looniam - it's actually an L-Series, not a GTS. While HWL says it's the same core, it consistently tests as more restrictive and lower performance than a GTS. And.....somehow putting the little sailboat on it makes it cost more than a GTS and 50% more than the exact same rad without the little sailboat. :doh:
I seriously can't believe people buy these Corsair rads. Or any Corsair liquid cooling. Or really anything from Corsair that isn't memory related....but that's a whole different discussion.
 

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I’m using a similar case. Meshify c .

3900x
2080ti

Rad fans are fractal Venturi 120HP scales to 1300rpm

240 gts top exhaust
360 gts front exhaust
120 rear noctua sa12 intake

After testing every possible config this proved to be the best performance.

Water temp reaches 34c under load
Ram 41c
Chipset 60c

Moving the fans to intake saw
41c water temps and
chipset 70c
ram 50c


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
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