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Discussion Starter #1
Recently got a new CPU cooler (nh d15) for my i5 2500k. I want to try to get to 5ghz. When I first got my CPU back in early 2012 I was able to get a stable overclock at 4.5ghz at 1.33ish volts. I never once got bsod gaming until last summer. It got really hot and just bsod a couple times during gaming. At the time my case didn't have the best airflow because of dust or it could of been because the CPU was getting old. Since then I have upgraded my CPU and got new fans + case so I want to redo all my bios settings and get a stable overclock. I want to try to get to 5ghz because I want to get the most of my CPU since it's getting old and I have a good cooler.

Is it better to overclock right now to get a stable overclock? It's the coldest time of the year where I live so my ambient temperatures is the lowest of the year. Once summer hits the ambient temperature gets very high since I don't really use AC. I'm hoping with my better airflow in my case it won't be much of an issue. Either way is it better to overclock now or wait till spring/summer to make sure I am getting it stable? I don't want to waste all the time now to get it stable to have it unstable during summer because of the highest ambient temperatures!

Also if I am only gaming will I still notice a difference from 4.5ghz to 5.0ghz? How much gain can I expect from that jump?
 

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RPG Gamer
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Ambient temps changes. My OC is year round, in the summer I just run the fans faster to compensate for the higher temps.
Going from 4.5ghz to 5.0ghz is a small gain in most cases.
 

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Just go for it. At best you won't have to worry all year and at worst, you may have to lower your OC or increase voltage when it becomes warmer. You won't see a big difference when it comes to gaming, maybe a tiny FPS increase and/or more stable min FPS.
 

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What PSU do you have in your system as that can hold back your overclock
Please fill out your system under your sig so everyone dont have to ask what you have
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by shilka View Post

What PSU do you have in your system as that can hold back your overclock
Please fill out your system under your sig so everyone dont have to ask what you have
520W antec high current gamer. I'm running an r9 280x that i plan on ocing as well.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shilka View Post

What PSU do you have in your system as that can hold back your overclock
Please fill out your system under your sig so everyone dont have to ask what you have
This is off topic - I got G2 only because of your recommendation but mate, how come you are so obsessed with them?
biggrin.gif
biggrin.gif
 

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Down and out, for now.
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I am waiting on colder water here in Denmark as I ran out of cooling headroom(spring time) as I prefer to use OCCT for testing to get really stable OC. I have a 4790k on D14 and I got 4.6 minus HT @1.245v . But could not get stable with hyper threading, I should just try to get 4.4 stable at lest.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trito View Post

This is off topic - I got G2 only because of your recommendation but mate, how come you are so obsessed with them?
biggrin.gif
biggrin.gif
Its not off topic if he had some el cheapo PSU he would not be able to overclock.

On ripple, and its effects on overclocking

Why is having good ripple suppression important? The first reason is hardware lifespan. Ripple wears on several types of electrical component, the most relevant being electrolytic capacitors. The closer ripple levels are to a capacitor's rated ripple, the shorter its lifetime will be, and ripple exceeding its rated level can cause it to blow or perform poorly. Since electrolytic capacitors are found in your power supply, motherboard, graphics card, and many other components, having a power supply with good ripple suppression is a must for long-term reliability.

Another problem poor ripple levels can cause is one that will surely strike fear into the heart of every overclocking enthusiast. Higher ripple levels means lower overclock.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shilka View Post

Its not off topic if he had some el cheapo PSU he would not be able to overclock.

On ripple, and its effects on overclocking

Why is having good ripple suppression important? The first reason is hardware lifespan. Ripple wears on several types of electrical component, the most relevant being electrolytic capacitors. The closer ripple levels are to a capacitor's rated ripple, the shorter its lifetime will be, and ripple exceeding its rated level can cause it to blow or perform poorly. Since electrolytic capacitors are found in your power supply, motherboard, graphics card, and many other components, having a power supply with good ripple suppression is a must for long-term reliability.

Another problem poor ripple levels can cause is one that will surely strike fear into the heart of every overclocking enthusiast. Higher ripple levels means lower overclock.
No no no, I'm not saying PSU is not important in the process of overclocking. Obv good delivery of power is one of the main things. I said off topic because I didn't contribute to the thread and asked you how come you are so invested in PSU's.
wink.gif
 
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