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I'm reviewing the Beyerdynamic DT880 600Ω Premium today. I wanted to get my ODAC/O2 amp on these before I gave it an official review. I'm ready to give a review on these headphones now for all of those wishing to either jump for these headphones or maybe try another. For the most part the review is going to have some semblance of order which will end in a chaotic cacophony of thoughts.



ODAC+O2 Amp w/ Modifications


Beyerdynamic DT880 600Ω


Also used Denon AVR-1912 & HTC Sensation 4G.



Exceptional Value))))

The Beyerdynamic DT880 600Ω Premiums are one of the best headphones under $400. Their MSRP is even $400, but no one should ever pay that much for these. They're good, but I'm not sure if they're $400 good, at least to me. Others might be willing to pay that, but I'd be happy to buy these under $250. I personally got them for $180 in mint condition, but that comes down to waiting for good deals on Head-fi, which can be done. That said, it's not hard to find these used for under $200. I see them often go for $185-$195 on Head-fi.org. That said, as far as value goes, these headphones are exceptional value and that's the first good thing I find these headphones have. Exceptional Value.

But why are they such good value? What makes them worth their price tag? Why should I dish out the extra money for these headphones as opposed to being satisfied with a cheaper headphone?

Well, as you move up the ladder in SQ, the benefits exponentially decrease. The difference between a 400 headphone and a 1000 dollar headphone aren't as large as the price difference would have you believe. I think after the $1000 price point headphones really start to get great again, but these differences most people aren't willing to pay for.

That said, many would argue the DT880 is one of the best headphones under $1000. I'm not necessarily arguing that, as I can find great headphones under $1000 that are better, but we're not going to argue that at this point. For now we're considering under $400 headphones. The MSRP of these headphones and the target area I think these headphones really stand out the most in. All that said, I probably still haven't answered the question. I'll come back to this later after pointing out more reasons why this headphone is a good purchase.

Performance))))
The Lows

I think there's some confusion in the community regarding the lows on this headphone. I'm going to go more on about the lows of this headphone than other sections since I think this area needs the most clarification for the greater populous than other areas of the sound spectrum. The lows are very much present, extending way down to 15hz. That said, the DT880s are great for extending down low, but the impact of the bass is not exactly what you'd expect from a headphone that goes down that low. The Beyerdynamic DT880s are NOT bassy headphones. If you own any Ultrasone Headphone and are looking for an upgrade, you may be disappointed in the amount of bass these headphones have. Same for DT770 or 990s users. The 770s and 990s have so much more bass than the DT880s. I wouldn't say the bass is anemic on the DT880s as they are on the AD700s, but they are not authoritative or overwhelming. In my opinion the DT990s have too much bass, but the bass isn't tight. The bass is bloated and just...bass. The DT880s offer that kick in bass acceptable by most genre's of music. Just the right bass for Jazz, the kick of a snare drum, the strum of a bass guitar is typically acceptable, although I've heard better headphones for this. Bass guitarists might not be proud of this headphone for that purpose, but not because the bass is lacking, but rather because the bass isn't as textured as other headphones are. Some feel adding a tube amp can help the DT880s out in that aspect, but I'm using the O2 amp to drive these. Transparent DAC, transparent amp, neutral headphones.

The DT880s can pump out a good amount of bass for electronica. Maybe not the UNN YEAH bass of Ultrasones or the other Beyer brothers, but these headphones can definitely perform well across the board. There's not a single genre I feel these headphones can't handle. Even dubstep is acceptable with these headphones, but I'd much rather choose another pair of headphones for dubstep. For those not pleased with the bass on the DT880s straight out of the box there are 2 things you can do to improve the bass on these without much effort.

1) Equalize the lower end to improve bass. These DT880s respond well to equalization without destroying the rest of the spectrum. Some headphones, you bump the bass and dang, there goes the mids and the highs. With the DT880s you can get away with increasing bass via equalizer and maintaining solid mids and highs (though, I argue the mids do get effected by the equalization of the lows a bit). That said, when equalized for a stronger low end, these headphones do become more enjoyable and can even pull a smirk on my face (I constantly look like this: =|, I guess that makes me look like this =]). For the record, I don't touch the equalizer for these headphones unless I'm listening to bass oriented music such as dubstep and don't want to change headphones.

2) Amp these headphones. I've said it a trillion times before and I'm going to say it again. Most headphones don't react as powerfully as others when it comes to amping headphones. People that tell me their AD700s are empowered by their amp, I'm here to tell you that's not true. Your AD700s aren't going to kick out bass because they're amped. Why then would amping these headphones improve bass response? Because they're 600 ohms and need an amp to really make these headphones dynamic. I'll get back to this later on. If I forget, remind me in comments below. An amp helps to tighten bass, drive the headphone allowing the coil to fluctuate appropriately and really get the sound it's meant to have. An amp doesn't improve sound quality, it just helps the headphone respond like it's supposed to and the most noticeable aspects to most people are in the lows. People notice the improved bass more than they do the improved highs and for many reasons this is more obvious than improved highs.

All that being said, I'm pleased with the lows but wish it had JUST a bit more oomph. On a scale of 1-10 1 being the AD700s and 10 being..Pro 900s or something. I'd put the DT880s at a 5. They're right in the middle I think. It's really hard to say. After hearing Ultrasone Pro 900s and the overwhelming amount of bass they have, I'd say the DT880s might even be a 4..but let's go with 5 since equalizing them can significantly improve bass response earning it a 5. If you don't plan on equalizing them for normal use (I don't) then consider them a 4.

I might jump in again later on the bass these headphones have, but in short, these cans don't favor the low end more than another area of the spectrum, making them neutral in nature. The low end is good enough for music to be enjoyable for many genres whereas the AD700s were only good for certain genres. This further adds to the value of this headphone since you can use it for more genres than other headphones. If you want to compare the bass to the HD650s, I would say the HD650s have a punchier bass while the bass on the DT880s is more..."elegant."

The Mids))))

The mids are difficult to put my finger on. I personally feel they're neutral. They're not sparkly like the AD700s or other bright headphones. That being said, for those that are used to sparkly mids, these DT880s can sound recessed, but I wouldn't say they're recessed. The mids those people that say the DT880s are mid recessed are talking about are enhanced...brighter...sparkly. The opposite of recessed. I would say the DT880s are inbetween sparkly and recessed. Truly neutral. Maybe not as neutral as say the T1, but for the price... NEUTRAL. For most people all this jibba jabba about sparkly sound and brightness may be confusing..so let me try to explain. Sparkly mids are very lively and engaging. They sort of give you that feeling in your chest when you breathe in slowly. It's this sort of...open, clear happiness to sound. The happiness is really more a sparkly sensation and the headphone being bright than it has to do with mids...but another way to think about this is for a headphone to be recessed would mean for it to be quieter and take a back seat to the other areas of the spectrum of sound for the headphone. This would mean that the mids would be less emphasized than the bass or the treble and this is clearly not the case for the DT880s which is why I don't think they're recessed. Perhaps another and better way to describe it is the mids are where the vocals take place. How the vocals come across are very important. There's a certain level of detail vocals should have. If the mids are recessed then vocals sound more congested.

Mids are probably my least favorite area to describe, but my favorite to listen to. That said as far as VOCALS go, I would say I enjoy my AD700s MORE than my DT880s, but that's not to say that the vocals on the DT880s are bad or that the mids are recessed, I just prefer more sparkly mids than the DT880s have.

Perhpas a better way to understand whether a headphone is recessed is to play with the equalizer. I think if you lower the mids, you'll understand what I mean by vocals getting congested, meanwhile making the mid range higher would give a sort of "clearer" "Sharper" sound, but having recessed mids or having sharper mids may not be good or bad. It simply depends how the entire headphone comes together and how you prefer your music to sound. I think another difficulty in saying if mids are recessed comes in relation to what it's being compared with. If the headphone accentuates treble and the low end, like Ultrasones do (Which is why the Pro 900 can be fatiguing), then it's easy to see how the mids can be recessed. That's not to say that headphones with strong mids and highs have recessed mids. For instance a headphone could be a 7 in the lows, a 5 in the mids and a 7 in the highs. That doesn't mean that the mid is recessed, just in relation to the others it seems recessed. Having a 7 in the lows 7 in the highs anda 3 in the mids would be recessed and that's more of the "V" shape you hear about in cans than the "U" shape described in the 7-5-7 headphone.

Some of you are probably hearing all of this for the first time and are like "what the...[explosion]" What is she talking about? Again, mids are difficult to type about, but if a headphone is mid recessed, I don't enjoy listening to it. Vocals play an immensely huge role in music for me. Female vocals in particular are a large part of my music listening. While I wouldn't say I get the most enjoyment listening to female vocals on this headphone, I would say they're good. I would only say they're recessed in comparison to the highs of this headphone.

The Highs))))

I think the highs on these headphones are good. The treble is pretty well pronounced. I've even caught certain sounds being painfully treble happy. "TS" or "SH" noises are sometimes sharp and painful..making this headphone sibilant. I have no problem calling this headphone sibilant as I think that accurately describes the headphone. Now some of you may be thinking Oh, God. This headphone is going to be painful to listen to. Not at all. Let me start off by stating that because these headphones are sibilant, certain sounds stand out more than in other headphones. What I noticed in this headphone in particular compared to other headphones is how very keen symbols were. They stuck out much more than in other headphones. Drummers might really enjoy this headphone as I can hear the drummer's portion of the song MUCH more than on other headphones. Most people hear the drums when they hit the snare hard or clang a symbol hard. What they typically don't hear that well is the constant click,click,click of the drummer maintaining the beat for the music. This constant tsh tsh tsh tsh stands out a lot more in the Beyerdynamic DT880. I've got to say it's becomes somewhat enjoyable to listen to. It's become separated from the cacophony of sounds heard in music. More on that later. The highs are very sweet and beautiful. I personally feel they're the shining light in these headphones. If there's on area you can really pick out it's in the highs. It does this very well. It's not painful, harsh or fatiguing like the Pro 900s, 990s and many other headphones. It's very smooth. Very enjoyable. God I love the highs on this headphone. POSSIBLY MORE than the AD700s. I thought the highs on the AD700s were pretty good. I still think that the AD700s for 90 dollars is one of the best headphones you can buy. They provide you with excellent sound overall and in many areas COMPARABLE to the DT880s. I think what makes the AD700s fail is the bass. Just..none there. If they AD700s are more bass, it would be a very very enjoyable headphone, especially for the price. More on this later.

The Highs are again great. Not much more needs to be said.

Overall SQ))))

The DT880s are very similar to the AD700s in terms of overall sound. Where the diverge is slightly in presentation (forwardness), the sparkliness of music and the bass. The DT880s are what the AD700s could have been. They're like the AD700s with good bass. The DT880s aren't quite as good as the AKG K701/Q701 in the mids, but are an overall more enjoyable headphone I think. The Instrument separation on these headphones is great. Not quite planar magnetic quality instrument separation, but that's to be expected. I can't really pick out one genre these excel in great than another. I think that's sort of the point though.



As far as what I don't like about this headphone, that's going to be much shorter than the good things I can say about it.

As I've already mentioned, the "TS" sibilant sounds on certain songs and on certain frequencies can be painful. Not in the sense that OH GOD MY EARS ARE BLEEDING, but more in the sense that it somewhat detracts from the song and makes you focus on that particular noise. It can also be quite high that it is unpleasant to listen to. I would say that hearing that "TS" sound isn't as often as you would think. More sounds are "TSH" which is an okay and perfectly normal sound that plays well on the DT880s. It's just this particular "TS" very sharp sounding noise that is unenjoyable. To be honest, I've only heard it frequently on one song I was listening to, but can't quite remember anymore..if It comes up I'll revise this post to reflect that song.

That said, symbols can be very enjoyable with this headphone or quite the opposite, unpleasant. It all depends on the frequency the symbol hits. If it's the wrong frequency it can be unpleasant and borderline painful. If it's almost any other frequency it is very enjoyable and the fact that you really hear the symbols and other drumming tunes is interesting. Most of the other headphone I've listened to don't bring out the drums section as well as these headphones. Wait, this is the bad section, must get back on these headphones sucking for this portion, not praise them.. My bad.

Let's see..oh yeah, I wish the bass had a bit more impact to it like the HD650s. While the bass is there, I wouldn't say it's my favorite part of the headphone. I'd take the mids and the highs over the lows on this headphone. Again, I think this headphone produces enough bass for music in all genres of music OTHER than electronica. For orchestral music the bass they use is FANTASTIC! Just the right amount. For Jazz, other than the texture being slightly lacking in my opinion (others argue the texture on the DT880s is great, I don't agree. That's not to say that it's completely textureless, it's not, it's just not as textured as other headphones I've listened to), it's quite good too.

Anyway, I'm getting bored of the bad section. The only other thing I'll throw in here is that these headphones are disappointing without an amp, so if you're buying the 600 ohm version, buy a damn amp. The amp makes this headphone good. Otherwise you have a sort of bland headphone that doesn't have the dynamic range it's supposed to. It doesn't go as high or as low and isn't as lively or engaging as it is with an amp.



I've run the DT880s off my phone. While it was very listenable at a normal level, there is a clear distinction in sound quality from your phone to your home usage with an amp. I've also run these headphones off my Denon AVR-1912. It was OK for the first few days, but as soon as I got my O2 amp and ODAC I'll never plug these into the AVR again.

As far as genre's go, I think PIANO MUSIC is probably my favorite to listen to on these headphones. The sound each key makes melts my heart. Gosh, just thinking about Beethoven's Piano Sonata in E flat major and how you can so clearly hear each key being pressed and how high that note goes is remarkable. I'd say if I had to pick a single genre, piano music would be my favorite with these headphones.

I think these are very open and airy sounding cans. I have not tried gaming with them yet, but I think they'd do good. I'm not quite sure they're as great as the AD700s for gaming yet, that's to be seen, but I think these can definitely hold up well. Unless you're completely competitive and feel the soundstage of the AD700s is necessary (I think the soundstage is awkwardly large), then the DT880s would be a suitable replacement and also a boost in overall gaming enjoyment with the added bass that the AD700s don't offer you.

Will update this section more as I game with these headphones.

I think a "cool" effect that works well with these headphones is sound that jumps from left speaker to the right speaker very fast. These headphones are great and are speedy cans. They react well and tight. Also spatial awareness on the SIDES of the headphone are fantastic. I can tell exactly how far a sound is on the sides. On the rear and the top I'm not too sure about yet. That's going to take some more time. I know for a fact that if the sound is properly done that sound from behind is quite good. In several Marilyn Manson songs he's actually singing to you from BEHIND rather than being in front of you. I'm not sure some people notice this, but it's very interesting. I think that the Right Rear area of the sound stage/imaging is somewhat weak. At least it's lacking compared to the rest of the area around my head. I'd like to hear other's opinions on this.

Equalizing this headphone SLIGHTLY can result in phenomenal changes..many of which I think many of you would enjoy. As I mentioned in my thread I'm a fan of positive mids and highs. I prefer them higher than neutral. That said when EQ'd slightly to raise the mids, the bass and just a tiny bit if at all the highs, you can really make these headphones livelier and clearer.

By the way, the ODAC is so very good. At first it's not immensely apparent as to whether it's good or overhyped, but the more you listen to it and hear sounds you've never heard before, you realize this is a good buy. Instrument separation is much improved. Great clarity. Absolutely fantastic quality control in terms of listening to music at high volumes. Very very silent DAC and amp. No noise unless it was recorded in the song and MAN can you hear when a song is recorded badly with all that hissing.



As far as Build Quality goes, the Beyerdynamic DT880s are pretty good.

I dislike the cord that comes with the DT880s. The cord seems slightly cheap, but I'm not necessarily talking about the quality of the cord but rather the appearance of it. Seems kinda' cheapish. Dislike it from an aesthetic point of view.

I dislike the headband. While the headband is COMFORTABLE, I think the plasticy trash that holds the soft leathery handband is garbage. They could really have done a better job on that. It's some kind of weird Vinyl plastic stuff.

The velour pads are amazing. They're so softy and awesome. I love that, but they do kind of get hot. not hot like leather, but more like you can feel it seals well around your ear and the heat from your head gets trapped inside. Honestly, that mostly depends on the outside temperature more than the headphone itself. If you're in a cool setting like 70 degrees, no problem. If you're near 80...somewhat of a problem..

The plastics used are sturdy and generally higher quality than found on cheaper products. The aluminum grills on the DT880s is very solid. I'm not sure you could push them in like on other headphones. These are really perforated closed back grills.

Overall for the price, they get a 7.8/10 on build quality.
 

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Thanks for the detailed review Simca.

In regards to increasing bass (via equalization or amp),
how much increased bass can the DT 880 600ohm's handle?

With my (premium) DT 880 250ohm's and stock Creative Titanium HD and no other amps,
the bass quickly turns to garbage when bass equilization and volume is increased too much in ASIO.
I suspect my sound card can not generate enough bass, but I would like to know your opinion on that.
Assuming unlimited amping, how much bass can the DT 880 handle?

Edit: When bass EQ is positive, asio plugin for foobar2000 causes bass distortion at high volume.
Negative EQ sounds fine in ASIO. Use negative EQ.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1318732/bass-distortion-at-high-volumes-with-asio

You are not exaggerating about drums. feels like sitting next to the drummer.
stereo separation between left and right is good and fun.

Treble usually sounds good or very good and sometimes a little too much, but it's very close to perfect.
mid's and vocals are clear and that's enough for me.
Just need to work on the bass.
 

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Hmm... Good question. I suppose if I'm really honest, the bass is not the best quality I've heard, but all in all it's not that bad. I'd say with a 6db equalization, you get some pretty decent bass out of it without turning to complete poo. Haven't equalized it higher than 6. I think part of it is the DAC, but there's also a limit to how much the headphone can handle and I'd say the 600 can handle a bit more equalization, without muddying. Still, it's really not meant for heavy bass usage.
 

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Equalizing this headphone SLIGHTLY can result in phenomenal changes..many of which I think many of you would enjoy. As I mentioned in my thread I'm a fan of positive mids and highs. I prefer them higher than neutral. That said when EQ'd slightly to raise the mids, the bass and just a tiny bit if at all the highs, you can really make these headphones livelier and clearer.
 

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Auckland, Australia

Really!?

This is like saying, 'Toronto, USA' to Canadians!!!!

Anyway, great review Simca however I do disagree with them being similar sounding to AD700s.

Anyway, the proper equalisation of the DT880:

f302qeu0.w4b.png


Factors in the lack of bass impact in headphone drivers vs. speakers and the slight bass recession of the DT880.
Basically it's +4dB in the bass to 100Hz, with it curving down to +0dB at 500 Hz.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chinesekiwi View Post

Auckland, Australia

Really!?

This is like saying, 'Toronto, USA' to Canadians!!!!

Anyway, great review Simca however I do disagree with them being similar sounding to AD700s.

Anyway, the proper equalisation of the DT880:

f302qeu0.w4b.png


Factors in the lack of bass impact in headphone drivers vs. speakers and the slight bass recession of the DT880.
Basically it's +4dB in the bass to 100Hz, with it curving down to +0dB at 500 Hz.
New Zealand, Australia...same place. ~Throw hands up!~

Plus, Toronto is pretty much USA. I mean Toronto has an NBA Basketball team. It's the US.
rolleyes.gif


No, I do understand what you mean about them sounding different than the AD700s, but I don't think they're so different that they sound like a completely different style headphone. If you're generally pleased with AD700 SQ but want some more thump in your music I think the DT880 would be a good upgrade staying with that same sound.

I've stumbled across something worrisome. I'm noticing that different media players handle their equalizer differently or the programs themselves are normally equalized differently than others. For instance, I feel Songbird is a very dead sounding music player. Music isn't very pleasing to listen to via Songbird and to get your headphones to a good listening sweet spot requires some Equalizing, but on the other hand MediaMonkey is almost perfect with a flat EQ and just needs a tiny tiny bit of equalization to get it to the sweet spot. I can't really understand this phenomena. Maybe someone does? Chime in.

Also, my father stole back the power cable I stole from him for my O2 >.>

So now I need to go purchase a 10A 18v Power cable for the O2. Or 10A 250v (american) power cable? Idk..I have no idea what it should be called. The thing on the back of the O2 says 10A 250v but I know that's an Australian measurement or whatever..I'm not sure what that translates to in proper American numbers.
smile.gif


Maybe a 13A 125v might do the job? Maybe 18VAC power cable...10A 125v Power Cable seems to be the only one that looks right though.

I'm kind of dumb when it comes to cables. I have no idea what type of cable I'm looking for. If it were up to me I'd just plug in whatever fits. :|

I need help finding the right one that I can pick up at wallmart or something.
biggrin.gif


I've come to the conclusion it doesn't matter. I just need a universal power cord, lol.
 

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Does the power cable look like the one used from your PC's power supply to the surge protector? If so, Radio Shack or Best Buy should have what you need.

What amp(A) rating at 120v does the unit call for? It should say on the back of the unit or in the manual. If not, a 14ga cable should be more than sufficient.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Face76 View Post

Does the power cable look like the one used from your PC's power supply to the surge protector? If so, Radio Shack or Best Buy should have what you need.

What amp(A) rating at 120v does the unit call for? It should say on the back of the unit or in the manual. If not, a 14ga cable should be more than sufficient.
I went to Radioshack earlier and picked one up. It's a 10A 125v cable found on any computer/power supply, monitor or w/e.

The problem is on the thing, it says 10A 250v because it was made in Australia.
lachen.gif
 

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I believe 250v, 10A = 1mm ga conductors, which is @ 20ga US, a US 120v, 10A cable uses 18ga conductors, so you should be fine.
thumb.gif


Someone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Face76 View Post

I believe 250v, 10A = 1mm ga conductors, which is @ 20ga US, a US 120v, 10A cable uses 18ga conductors, so you should be fine.
thumb.gif


Someone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.
~Nods like she understood that.~ Yeah, yep. That's about it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simca View Post

~snip~

I've stumbled across something worrisome. I'm noticing that different media players handle their equalizer differently or the programs themselves are normally equalized differently than others. For instance, I feel Songbird is a very dead sounding music player. Music isn't very pleasing to listen to via Songbird and to get your headphones to a good listening sweet spot requires some Equalizing, but on the other hand MediaMonkey is almost perfect with a flat EQ and just needs a tiny tiny bit of equalization to get it to the sweet spot. I can't really understand this phenomena. Maybe someone does? Chime in.

~snip~
I haven't tried SongBird or MediaMonkey nor dug into any information about them to know exactly what they're doing but most likely your hearing the difference between good/bad/different software pre-amps/equalizers/limiters. If you increase the EQ, especially the lower frequencies, and your playing normalized music (most of it is) then without a pre-amp to lower the input to the equalizer it's going to flat-line (above 0dB), so you'd need some sort of limiter and an EQ'er would come with one or the other or both and you'd get some or no control of either of them, there's also possibly some internal re-sampling in the application before and/or after the effects (EQ, volume, ect) are applied. There's good, bad, excellent and just different software re-sampling engines, equalizers and limiters and maybe not the best combination of any of them in your average "free" player. I suspect you have the hardware and a well trained enough ear to notice the difference between them.

I just got the Isone VST that Chinesekiwi posted up, wow, that's what Dolby Headphone should be doing - I don't want to turn it off. I expect I'll have a heart attack when I discover how much the license costs.
 

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If you like Media Monkey, you should try J. River. It has all MM has plus a much better interface. Besides a simple EQ, there's also various DSP's, room correction, parametric EQ, adjustable crossfeed, etc...
 

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JRiver looks nice, but MediaMonkey has lots of custom skins as well. I like mine atm and I'm not keen on paying for software, especially for music players..

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren9 View Post

I just got the Isone VST that Chinesekiwi posted up, wow, that's what Dolby Headphone should be doing - I don't want to turn it off. I expect I'll have a heart attack when I discover how much the license costs.
15 Euro. Really.

http://www.toneboosters.com/shop/

That said, you must calibrate the HRTF function of it to use it properly. How to calibrate it properly is in the manual here: http://www.toneboosters.com/manuals/TB_Plugins_Manual.pdf

It's the makers' side project.i.e. Not his main source of income. He was part of the team that developed the mp4 container standard.

Dolby Headphone is simulating surround sound speakers and does not factor in headphone psychoacoustics like Isone.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simca View Post

JRiver looks nice, but MediaMonkey has lots of custom skins as well. I like mine atm and I'm not keen on paying for software, especially for music players..
I haven't used MM in a few years, I see they changed some things around. Here's a couple screen shots of J. River.


hYMLO.jpg
 

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I liked mine a lot, but I must have big ears or an oddly shaped head because the only real con for me that I found with them is that they were extremely uncomfortable after 20 minutes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chinesekiwi View Post

15 Euro. Really.
http://www.toneboosters.com/shop/
That said, you must calibrate the HRTF function of it to use it properly. How to calibrate it properly is in the manual here: http://www.toneboosters.com/manuals/TB_Plugins_Manual.pdf
It's the makers' side project.i.e. Not his main source of income. He was part of the team that developed the mp4 container standard.
Dolby Headphone is simulating surround sound speakers and does not factor in headphone psychoacoustics like Isone.
Thanks, I'm waiting for a keyfile to turn up
smile.gif
Do you (or anyone else) know if it's possible to host a VST plugin closer to the soundcard (would process all windows audio) rather than just files I play in the application?
 

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Hello, I've had borrowed 250ohm edition version of DT880 for 2 weeks, with AD700 and AD900. I think, differances between DT880 250 ohm and 600 ohm will be only minor.
I am another one, who completely disagree to compare DT880 and AD700. It's like other league. AD700 was with overall quality of sounds one level behind DT880. More proper comparsion would be DT800 and AD900... that's the same league of sound quality. But even in this case... DT880 are semi-open headphones, while AD700/900 are open headphones... and to extend of that, they are trying to most airy and open from all headphones. And they are good in this. DT880 are not airy at all. AD700/AD900 are the most bass light headphones, I ever heard. DT880 are right in the middle. I would say, bass of DT880 is real and neutral. It is not lacking, just all recordings now are overbassed... and people are used to listen to lot of basses. DT880 are monitors... that means, they are trying to reproduce bass without any addition of weight or power. You will hear exactly amount of basses, how would you hear it in studio. Of course, in world of overbassed music, it can seem to lack of basses. Another thing, while I don't find DT880 and AD700/900 similiar, is, DT880 has not very wide soundstage. AD700/900 have wider soundstage. (AKG K701 has even more). I can for sure say, that even HD600 have bigger soundstage, than DT880. So, don't except great soundstage from DT880. They doesn't try to be musical... they just want to play all tones, as their are, perfectly separated, and clear... to help user to find any mistakes in recording. That's why they lack musicality. Another issue is, that they are so bright, and have so much highs, that they are fatiqueing after about 30 minutes of listening. They are not intented for long listening... those are other kind of headphones, that are for fun. These are made for analyse recording... which you don't make more than few minutes, and in most of the time, less than hour. They have very good instrument separation, I would say, it is even a little bit unnatural, how are instruments separated... and again... this is perfect attribute for monitoring, but not so good attribute for enjoying long-term listening. I would say, they are lacking of musicality, because of this. You hear all the tones, you hear that music, but ... it doesn't gives you so much shivers, like AKG K701 or HD600. I need to say, sometimes I was really boring listening to them. But.. I knew about every instrument, that was in the recording... and with very much detail.
They are extremly sensitive for good input. That means two things: pitperfect transmision (ASIO) and dynamical recording, without clipping. No that loudness war, that is all around. If this is not fullfiled, DT880 just reveal it... and it doesn't sound good. So, practically speaking, you can throw away 3/4 of modern CDs... it's garbage, and it doesn't sound good on DT880. You need perfect work from studio, to sound it good on DT880.

I would say.. they are professional headphones, and you need to have recordings made by good studio work. Another issue is, they have very big impedance, so again, you need professional amplifier. I would say, HD600 or HD598 fits more casual listeners, than DT880.

One point I completely agree are velour pads. They are far the most comfortable I ever touch on any headphones. The headphones itself are not so comfly, although I would not say, they are uncomfortable... they are, just not #1... but those velour pads are work of perfection. ;-) Without any doubt I can say, material on those velour pads is #1 in world. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Segovax View Post

I liked mine a lot, but I must have big ears or an oddly shaped head because the only real con for me that I found with them is that they were extremely uncomfortable after 20 minutes.
Not sure what you mean by extremely uncomfortable. Only comfort issues I have with them is that with my long hair these things really get quite warm/retains heart inside of the cup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrax View Post

Hello, I've had borrowed 250ohm edition version of DT880 for 2 weeks, with AD700 and AD900. I think, differances between DT880 250 ohm and 600 ohm will be only minor.
I am another one, who completely disagree to compare DT880 and AD700. It's like other league. AD700 was with overall quality of sounds one level behind DT880. More proper comparsion would be DT800 and AD900... that's the same league of sound quality. But even in this case... DT880 are semi-open headphones, while AD700/900 are open headphones... and to extend of that, they are trying to most airy and open from all headphones. And they are good in this. DT880 are not airy at all. AD700/AD900 are the most bass light headphones, I ever heard. DT880 are right in the middle. I would say, bass of DT880 is real and neutral. It is not lacking, just all recordings now are overbassed... and people are used to listen to lot of basses. DT880 are monitors... that means, they are trying to reproduce bass without any addition of weight or power. You will hear exactly amount of basses, how would you hear it in studio. Of course, in world of overbassed music, it can seem to lack of basses. Another thing, while I don't find DT880 and AD700/900 similiar, is, DT880 has not very wide soundstage. AD700/900 have wider soundstage. (AKG K701 has even more). I can for sure say, that even HD600 have bigger soundstage, than DT880. So, don't except great soundstage from DT880. They doesn't try to be musical... they just want to play all tones, as their are, perfectly separated, and clear... to help user to find any mistakes in recording. That's why they lack musicality. Another issue is, that they are so bright, and have so much highs, that they are fatiqueing after about 30 minutes of listening. They are not intented for long listening... those are other kind of headphones, that are for fun. These are made for analyse recording... which you don't make more than few minutes, and in most of the time, less than hour. They have very good instrument separation, I would say, it is even a little bit unnatural, how are instruments separated... and again... this is perfect attribute for monitoring, but not so good attribute for enjoying long-term listening. I would say, they are lacking of musicality, because of this. You hear all the tones, you hear that music, but ... it doesn't gives you so much shivers, like AKG K701 or HD600. I need to say, sometimes I was really boring listening to them. But.. I knew about every instrument, that was in the recording... and with very much detail.
They are extremly sensitive for good input. That means two things: pitperfect transmision (ASIO) and dynamical recording, without clipping. No that loudness war, that is all around. If this is not fullfiled, DT880 just reveal it... and it doesn't sound good. So, practically speaking, you can throw away 3/4 of modern CDs... it's garbage, and it doesn't sound good on DT880. You need perfect work from studio, to sound it good on DT880.

I would say.. they are professional headphones, and you need to have recordings made by good studio work. Another issue is, they have very big impedance, so again, you need professional amplifier. I would say, HD600 or HD598 fits more casual listeners, than DT880.

One point I completely agree are velour pads. They are far the most comfortable I ever touch on any headphones. The headphones itself are not so comfly, although I would not say, they are uncomfortable... they are, just not #1... but those velour pads are work of perfection. ;-) Without any doubt I can say, material on those velour pads is #1 in world. ;-)
I have to say reading this was a bit painful. Needs more paragraphs. That said, I disagree with a few things you've said and I'll tell you why.

I think the difference between the AD700s and the AD900s isn't as significant as you're claiming. Yes, they're better in the mids and more importantly in the lows, but they're not 2x the price worth better. I think the AD700s are priced very nicely for the quality of audio you get from them, but ultimately the lack of bass really hurts it. I also think you're not giving the AD900s enough credit for the lows they have. Much better bass than the AD700s, but ultimately they're still bass light. The A900s are even better for bass. Some say you can EQAD700s to be on par with AD900s and even if that's almost true, that makes the AD900 poor in the value department.

I also disagree that the DT880s aren't airy. I find them to be quite airy, especially for a semi-open headphone. No, they're not open headphone airy, but they're not open headphones. The AD700 has "AIR" written on the side of the headphones, that's how airy they are and a lot of people seem to think that all open headphones are as airy sounding as AD700s. They're not that airy. AD700s are very airy. With that in mind, the DT880s really are airy when you consider the above. They are much more open sounding than closed sounding.

While the DT880s are a step up in the audio department, and you should expect them to be considering the price for them, I wouldn't say that they're infinitely better than the AD700s. I think the reason why I enjoyed the AD700s to a certain extent more than the DT880s is because they're more musical than the DT880s. DT880s are missing a bit of musicality and are very neutral.

I also don't give the HD600s as much praise as you do. I prefer them for certain types of genres, but not much more than that, very much like the AD700s.

I also disagree that the DT880s have exact bass. I still think that for music they're lacking a bit more impact, texture and quantity. This is very apparent when you listen to bass guitars. They simply don't have the right amount of bass they should have. I can forgive the headphones for the bass concerning dubstep, but I can't forgive them regarding Jazz and bass guitars. They just don't sound that good IMO in this regard.

I think the soundstage on the DT880s is good. The AD700s without a doubt are larger, but I'm thinking the DT880 sound stage is closer to accurate while the AD700s is unnatural and excessive much like the AKG's. You may prefer the larger soundstage, but I don't agree it's accurate. I'm not sure the DT880s soundstage is perfect either, but I have yet to really come in contact with a headphone where I thought "the soundstage on these are perfect." Maybe I simply don't know what a perfect soundstage is.

I would say there's a considerable difference in terms of soundstage between the DT880s and the AD700s, but again, the AD700 soundstage is just enormous. I think the DT880s makes up for it's soundstage in games with it's excellent instrument separation and imaging.

I disagree that the DT880s are fatiguing. The DT880s are praised for being headphones that ARE NOT fatiguing and that you can listen to forever while many other headphones are very much fatiguing. I would not say these headphones are fatiguing at all. I would say I'd take them off sooner because of the heat around my ears from the velour cups(mind you my room is 78 degrees which is a bit on the warmer side if I'm honest. I think at 72-74 degrees I wouldn't have any problem with the heat around my ears) than because of fatigue from the sound.

I already stated I am a fan of highs and I think the highs on the DT880s are very beautiful to me. I can see how others that are not a fan of treble may feel that the DT880s are too trebley, but I think they're great. The highs are not something I touch on the equalizer.

I think you overestimate how much music has suffered from the loudness war. Maybe the genre's you listen to are like that, but a lot of my music is unaffected by it. That said, I think the only reason you would not want to listen to the DT880s is because of their lack of musicality. Not because of loudness war or any other excuse.

Back to the bass, I think to make the bass about right requires significant equalization in the 63-125hz range.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Wanted to further add that I highly recommend a high quality rip of a song if you have a good DAC+these. Otherwise these will shred the file apart and you'll get very unpleasant noise in return. This goes for dubstep and orchestral music like Hans Zimmer. Mp3's just don't jive well with the DT880s if the rip wasn't good. FLAC is highly recommended.
 
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