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I've got two connections from my router running to both gigabit LAN ports on my motherboard and I bridged the connections. <br />
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Will this result in higher download/upload speeds? I'm not seeing much of a difference so I don't know if there's something else I need to do. Thanks.
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>ElMikeTheMike</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">I've got two connections from my router running to both gigabit LAN ports on my motherboard and I bridged the connections. <br />
<br />
Will this result in higher download/upload speeds? I'm not seeing much of a difference so I don't know if there's something else I need to do. Thanks.</div>

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</div>sorry no. Bridging is used for combining two different networks. not for speed.
 

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Binding is the term you are looking for. Servers use it to bind two or more gigabit lines into one logical network connection. You need binding capable LAN cards and binding compatible ethernet switches. Expensive stuff.
 

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...Or nVidia's Teaming capability, available on their AM2 boards. It lets you combine, as you said, the two ports into a super-port <img src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>Burn</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">...Or nVidia's Teaming capability, available on their AM2 boards. It lets you combine, as you said, the two ports into a super-port <img src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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TEAMING...darn it, that's the word. But you still need a teaming compatible ethernet switch on the other end.
 
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