Overclock.net banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My cablemod 24pin melted into my power supply unit, causing my computer to randomly restart without notice. I only noticed this issue once I took apart the computer and pulled the cables from the PSU. It seems this could have been a dangerous situation and thankfully nothing caught fire. Unfortunately, it seems that the cables melted into the psu (evga 1200). I'm not sure whether it was faulty cables or faulty psu that caused this damage. (could psu somehow melt the cables?)


Everythingheld up well for about 6 months, but then disaster. Potentially because I started mining over the last few days.
2474042
2474043
2474044





Update: Just spent the last few hours cleaning all the melted debris and plastic from the PSU socket.

Unfortunately it looks like some of the shroud around the pins were damaged... do you guys think the psu is still usable or should I just replace it?
2474051
2474052
 

·
woot
Joined
·
2,619 Posts
i wouldnt worry about the socket because the molex on the cable will keep the pins separated...especially with a psu as you dont often removed/reattach the cables.

i would be worried about why it happened though, and how do you ensure it wont happen again. something failed, shorted or your amperage draw was through the roof on those pins (which are all +3.3v). you oc'ing ram?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
i wouldnt worry about the socket because the molex on the cable will keep the pins separated...especially with a psu as you dont often removed/reattach the cables.

i would be worried about why it happened though, and how do you ensure it wont happen again. something failed, shorted or your amperage draw was through the roof on those pins (which are all +3.3v). you oc'ing ram?

Hey, yeah I have 256gb of ram overclocked to 3400mhz at 1.41v in bios. Should I lower the voltage to the ddr? I wasn't aware those pins were for the ram. Thanks for any advice.
 

·
Newb to Overclock.net
Joined
·
4,283 Posts
holy 256GB Ram overclock melts 24pin... what else is new?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
something failed, shorted or your amperage draw was through the roof on those pins (which are all +3.3v).
Thats the most likely case I'd say. Even 256GB of Ram (8x16GB ?) should not draw more than maybe 25W. (no OC)
Lets assume 25W on 3.3V that would be a bit more than 7.5A. The EVGA 1200 P2 is rated for 20A on 3.3V (max).
No problem there. That leaves us with a shortage, massive OC (unlikely) or what I suspect, a faulty cable / connection.

Are there markings on your mainboard or on / near any 3.3V components?
3.3V components are: RAM, M.2 slots and PCIe slots (or at least these slots provide 3.3V)

Before you put anything bak togehter make sure your components are ok first.
There was a rason why you cable got warm. If it wasn't the cable itself (rusted, corroded, bad crimp) it will happen again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Just my 2 cents here - looks like the connector in the cable had a bad connection that introduced resistance and resulting heat. - You can clearly see the heat has come from the cableside and not from the PSU side and this as a result of bad connection (either between the PSU pin and Cable pin OR bad contact between Cable pin and wire)

PSU should still be fine AFAICS

C
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thats the most likely case I'd say. Even 256GB of Ram (8x16GB ?) should not draw more than maybe 25W. (no OC)
Lets assume 25W on 3.3V that would be a bit more than 7.5A. The EVGA 1200 P2 is rated for 20A on 3.3V (max).
No problem there. That leaves us with a shortage, massive OC (unlikely) or what I suspect, a faulty cable / connection.

Are there markings on your mainboard or on / near any 3.3V components?
3.3V components are: RAM, M.2 slots and PCIe slots (or at least these slots provide 3.3V)

Before you put anything bak togehter make sure your components are ok first.
There was a rason why you cable got warm. If it wasn't the cable itself (rusted, corroded, bad crimp) it will happen again.

Hi there, 256gb is 8x32gb, but as far as I'm aware this should still have been OK? I did notice that the sleeving on the backside was pulled off quite a bit, which may indicate there was some pressure pulling on those particular pins.

No crazy marks that I can see around the board or ram sticks.
I ended up ordering a replacement corsair Ax1600i just in case...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
i wouldnt worry about the socket because the molex on the cable will keep the pins separated...especially with a psu as you dont often removed/reattach the cables.

i would be worried about why it happened though, and how do you ensure it wont happen again. something failed, shorted or your amperage draw was through the roof on those pins (which are all +3.3v). you oc'ing ram?
Is´nt it the 12 volts that are melted (18pin connector)? Would match with the Mining use -> increased load on 12v line through PCiE slot

2474108
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #9

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
@Cavokk Looks like you are right.
In that case we are talking about much more Watts than before, and the cable gets a new dimension.
And pretty much any component of the PC is now included in the "check before restart" checklist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
--EDIT--
Ok, now im confused.
In the picture where the PSU can be seen, the molten 18Pin socket is on the right, while in the diagram it's on the left.

According to the picture, I'd say the Pins are 12V+.
@happyluckbox Could you please provide the product number of your PSU. Maybe EVGA switched socket positions on it's PSU down the product line, or pc-mods.com did only provide a socket overview without regard to the actual socket placement on the PSU.

No crazy marks that I can see around the board or ram sticks.
I ended up ordering a replacement corsair Ax1600i just in case...
Just make sure it wasn't just the cable, would be bad, blowing up another PSU, becasue e.g. your loop had a tiny leak and dropped some coolant on your gpu pcie slot.
Or such thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I burned the 2 pins opposite of the 10pin. (not next to it) Isn't that the red ones according to the diagram?

Also, can't view your attach
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I burned the 2 pins opposite of the 10pin
Thats why I was a little confused.
On your photo, the 18pin is right, the 10pin left. On the schematics it's opposite.

If you look only at the 18pin socket and mind the perspective of the schematic, you burned the 12V+ pins.
2474121

Regardless, please provide the full modelnumber of your PSU,
that way we can use the actual datasheet from EVGA, and not a generic one from a modding suplier.
It might be possible that schmeatic is not for your exact PSU model. One model might have a different socket placement or pin assignment than the one of the, lets say, next generation.

Btw. the confusion with 3.3V stemmed from acidentially looking at the mainboard side of the cable (see below, or see "Motherboard side" on your schematic).
 

·
Iconoclast
Joined
·
30,512 Posts
I'm not sure whether it was faulty cables or faulty psu that caused this damage. (could psu somehow melt the cables?)
Cable probably wasn't crimped correctly and wasn't making good enough contact with the wire, causing a hotspot that failed.

It's also possible that too much current was being pulled and the PSU itself has faulty OCP, but chances are it's the cable.

Unfortunately it looks like some of the shroud around the pins were damaged... do you guys think the psu is still usable or should I just replace it?
PSU might be ok, but I would replace it to be on the safe side.
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: looniam

·
Facepalm
Joined
·
9,192 Posts
Not the first time a cablemod cable fried someone's connector. @dante`afk 's 3090 FE connector melted too because cablemod did a bad crimp which melted. I would avoid them. Make your own cable and do it right, or stick with stock cables.
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: Ichirou

·
Expert pin bender
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
I had this happen to me years ago running gtx 480 quad SLI. I replaced the stock cable and fixed the socket side on the mainboard.(PSU and Mainboard tested good ) If i recall it was fixed a few ways for me afterwards., I wasn't using the PCIE aux power plugs on the mainboard which i should have been. I also ended up using a PSU adapter that let me daisy chain an additional 1200 watt psu.

Fast forward to just a month ago, i was having issues with one of my Vega FE gpus crashing(2 in MPGPU), i decided to pull the system apart and found out i had some burnt looking pins on the 8pin PCIE power cables. I just upgraded to a 6900xt so i don't know that i will be doing anymore MGPU since its all but dead. My psu and mainboard work fine, so i doubt your psu or mobo or GPUs are at risk. Most motherboards dont have the PCIE aux power plugs anymore. It maybe just a not so well connected connector(crimped) like others say.

I looked up your motherboard and you do have an additional pcie aux power plug, called EZ plug. Do you know if your using it? If not i would recommend using it even if you only have 1 GPU installed.
see picture from your manual attached
2474174


Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I would be calling Cablemod and asking for a refund. Another thing to consider is that Cablemod uses 18AWG wire while many other custom cable companies use 16AWG.
 

·
H₂O Aficionado
Joined
·
4,000 Posts
From all the posts I've read, it appears to be that there are a few factors here.
  • High GPU load (read Dagget3450's post);
  • Additional strain on 12v connector within the 24 pin cable (read Cavokk's / Blameless post);
  • Potentially sub-par 24 pin cable *Edit 18 + 10 at PSU.
    • Smaller gauge copper wire (18 vs 16) and;
    • Poorly crimped.
I don't know if its possible to validate the poor crimp, at this stage, but given the location of the failure, it's the mostly likely cause. As the stress was too great and the cable failed at the weakest point.

If your PSU was faulty, it's a hell of a coincidence that the fault happened there.

As an extra precaution, I would still advise on replacing the PSU. As we can't guarantee there wasn't additional damage internally. However, it is likely "fine". It's up to you if you want to proceed further.

If you do, then it will be best to first install the stock cable, and try components individually.

If successful, consider Dagget3450's post. You may need the additional supply provided by the molex.

Final notes below.
The only thing I don't understand is the pin-out diagram, shown in messages above. If that is the correct pin-out, it looks like 5v (red squares). For the sake of discussion for those who are more electronically inclined, what is on the 5v rail (USB, Storage devices?) and how would it cause such a failure.
 

·
Expert pin bender
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
Also, i didn't clarify but in my cases of melting/burnt psu cables. First time it happened was only on my ATX 24 pin plug(melted badly bad like yours) and second time was my 8 pin pcie plug(slight blacken 12v connectors psu side of modular cable), both scenarios i was using stock power cables from psu manufacturer and different power supplies and motherboards/gpus. So it was not the same hardware but both PSU's involved were modular.

The melting/hot points do seem to occur at a connection point. Almost exclusively restricted to the cable. I would suspect a combo of high power draw and possibly connections/crimps. I am sure someone with electrical engineering background has more information.

In my case typically the PSU would OCP or system become unstable.

2474187
2474188
 

·
H₂O Aficionado
Joined
·
4,000 Posts
This should be the model of the OP's PSU if the sig is up to date. There aren't multiple revisions of EVGA 1200 P2 to my knowledge.


2474192
2474193

If the revised, cleaner version is true, it is the 12v (cable view). See below.

2474197

 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top