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My mobo says I can run up to DDR800, but I've seen people use 1066 RAM with it. How is that possible? Wouldn't that be best so that I can run 1:1?
 

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it can be used but that doesn't mean it makes a difference.

EDIT: it if has SLI memory (on the chipset) it can run things like 1250...

What chipset is your mobo?
 

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1:1 isnt the best for ddr2, seems like bandwidth is. find some benchmarks on OCN. i was reading one earlier but forgot the link. it's possible because its not 1:1. using 1066 just means that it will be 1066 stable on the stock vdimm and meaning that you may be able to overclock higher to like 1200mhz maybe.
 

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Quote:
My mobo says I can run up to DDR800, but I've seen people use 1066 RAM with it. How is that possible? Wouldn't that be best so that I can run 1:1?
No...it would actually be better for you to run higher than 1:1...and yes that mobo will support 1066 RAM and higher.
 

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You want to get Rightmark Memory Analyzer, SiSandra 2007, or Everest.
Here are some goodies for you. They have a cool CPU physics bench.
http://cpu.rightmark.org/download.shtml
You want to run you RAM at 1:1 as high as it will go, until you reach a point that it's holding back the CPU. At this point you need to run through some math and bandwidth benches (as well as games for FPS) to see if there is a diminished return on increases CPU frequency in relation to increased memory frequency.
I. E. let's say your memory maxes out at 1000 MHz at certain timings. If you CPU can go higher (you know because you found your max by setting the divider really low), then you can try setting the divider lower. Load CPU-Z and see what the numerical value is of the divider. You can then calculate what your memory is without having to boot and see.
Eventually you will arrive at a trade off between CPU being an extra 50-100 MHz with the RAM being on a larger divider and losing 25-50MHz, or the other way around. It also depends on your motherboards BIOS options.
Another thing you can look into is this cooler:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...2bXTC%2bcooler
This way you can crank up the voltage past what you previously have. It really does help in a MASSIVE way.
 
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