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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't gotten my PC ICE in the mail yet and I was wondering if I can use tap water to do the leak test. Or will this put minerals and other junk in the system and contaminate it?
 

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If you have a water purifier then run it through that first... Your best bet would be to just wait it out though.
 

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Yeah, you can use tap water for leak testing, but I really wouldn't keep it in there for more than 24 hours or so.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Alright, I was going to run to the store and get some distilled water, but that would require wayyy to much effort. I mean all that driving, and walking, and then trying to find it, the trying to find a short line, and then paying for it, then to drive back home. Soooo much stuff to do. Ill let UPS do my biding and wait.
Oh and thanks for the reply.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by CyberDruid

No

lol, using tap water for 24 hours isn't going to hurt anything.
 

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Tap water IS VERY VERY BAD for waterblocks, and RADs. It has fluoride and chlorine. The tap watter will destroy radiators and heatercores, because of all the junk in it. DO NOT USE TAP WATER, EVER. Only use idstilled water. Trust me, I almost ruined my heatercore by usinging tap water.
 

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I read a very technical post in which some developers of waterblocks pretty much said that it would INSTANTLY begin to degrade to heat-shedding properties of the copper--if there is a disimilar metal in the loop (like an aluminum rad of stainless impeller shaft). One poor fellow had just run tap water through his new waterblock to test the system for leaks and then blew it out--but a patina had already formed on the waterblock--that fast. What may appear to be a little discoloration is actually a change in the metal's surface structure--the salts in the water from the chlorine and flourine form a microscale on the copper effectively insulating it from the water and reducing the ability of the heatsink to transfer the heat it has drawn off the CPU into the water.

When I say NO, it's because I have some small understanding of elctrolysis and why go do something that professional waterblock developers warn against... (See ProCoolingForums if you are curious...)
 

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Yes, tap water is very bad for a water loop, and yes, it will cause damage. However, a few hours of leak testing will not produce any undesirable effects. Sure, on a microscopic level it might induce electrolysis, but are you going to notice a difference in temps or see discoloration in your block....no.

I have been reading Procooling for years now, and I understand what you are saying. However, I have done this many times, once again, for only a few hours at a time, and I have never seen any negligible difference in either performance or color of the copper.

Edit: I say this ONLY if you are using an entirely copper/brass loop. If you have aluminum in it, then NEVER use tap water.
 

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Also, the pipes in my appartment are at least 70 years old, so that may have contributed to all of the corosion that the tap water caused. But you know what you guys know what you are talking about, I guess having in in you loop for >24 hours should be fine.
 

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Bah! Don't be lazy and just go get some distilled water.
 

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Dude, 70 years old?? Umm, I wouldn't put that stuff in my computer, much less drink it.

Quote:


Originally Posted by CyberDruid

Well that's your opinion...

Well, let's do some experimentation. I will see if I can find some cheap copper stock, then set up a loop with the copper inside the resevoir (to simulate a waterblock), and run it for 24 hours with tap water. Then we could perform the same test, with the same size/weight copper block, but use distilled water instead. It would not be empirical scientific data by any means, but at least we could see if there is any visual buildup (or breakdown) after 24 hours. Heck, maybe even perform the test for 48 hours just to see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Alright Ill let you guys go along with your discussions, as for me Ill just wait the day or so. And if I can't wait then Ill go to the store and get some distilled water. Thanks for the help.
Although it is cool reading the different views about this topic.
I say you try that experiment. Why not.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by atomicfission92

I say you try that experiment. Why not.

I think I just might do that.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Lando95

I think I just might do that.


I gotta see this.

I'm sure you guys have seen what the inside of plumbing looks like after having tap water run through it... it ain't pretty. This 24 hour test sounds like a good idea Lando.
 

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It reminds me of a friend who ran his car engine with tap water. Iron block alluminum head alluminum radiator I think. End result a year later he was having overheating issues. and mud flying out of the overflow tank. It was really rust and corrosion. Wasnt pretty. WE tried everything to reverse it but it was time to ditch the whole engine.
 
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