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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to set up all my folding rigs...I got them put together finally and all I need now is to get them all hooked up to my network. At first I had planned to put wireless PCI cards in them, but then I began to wonder if I could plug a router into my other router and basically turn my 4 ports into 7. I currently have one spare wireless card and probally 30 wired ethernet cards. I see that I shouldn't have any trouble getting an old beat up router off eBay for much more than some idiot's overpriced shipping. So here is what I had in mind...

I would have four folding machines plugged into the second router and one other fold only machine going wireless. I would have two other "main" rigs
(that will be folding in their spare time as well), but they'll be plugged into the main router and a laptop will occationally surf wirelessly as well.

Will this setup work? I have never tried to plug a router into a router and I don't want to do some thing stupid like fry my cable modem or some thing. My router manual states that it can support upto 50 wireless connections.
 

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It wont fry anything. At most, your network will lock up and you'll have to unplug your router and plug it back in again. A cheap switch plugged into your router would be your best option IMO. Thats what I'm doing for my multiple Folding Rigs.
 

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It should work and if it doesn't it will not fry the modem. If it doesn't work you can put two NICs in one computer and have the second router hooked to that using it as a bridge. As long as that computer is always on you'll have full service to the rest. So I wouldn't put it on your main rig...

Let me know how it works out for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by Ty Auchter

It should work and if it doesn't it will not fry the modem. If it doesn't work you can put two NICs in one computer and have the second router hooked to that using it as a bridge. As long as that computer is always on you'll have full service to the rest. So I wouldn't put it on your main rig...

Let me know how it works out for you.


Hmm...if I do that will the bridged comps show up on my network? I've done that in the past before I had a router but I didn't do any file sharing with the machines. I am not planning to have a monitor on any of the folders. I will hook one up every now and then to make sure they are folding but I plan to just check to see if they are on the network and I can access a shard folder to make sure they aren't locked up. This works currently with my one monitor-less folder that I also happen to have a 300 gig hard drive on that I use as network storage.
 

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If they are configured for open access then you can see them... Just run all the FAH programs from a shared folder and you can easily monitor them from your main rig by linking to the unit info files! Weeee...
 

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Fry the modem???!!? That wont happen. Router are DESIGNED to connect to other routers. Thats what they do. What do you think is the first thing you hit when a packet is sent out from your computer. It hits another router before anything else. You just have to change the subnets on the routers so that the data sent will keep going instead of stopping.
 

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If it's a residential router with an integrated switch, turn DHCP off on the secondary residential router. Then, plug one end of the ethernet cable into an internal/LAN port in the primary residential router, and plug the other end into the secondary residential router's internal port.

I'm doing the same thing here to multiplex my cable connection among my machines. The cable modem runs into an old FreeBSD machine. That is then connected to an internal port on a spare residential router I had sitting around. That residential router is then connected to two other computers and a cheap switch that further expands the network and connects to several other machines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
LOL, well I had a set back to this project...did some remodling around the house which involved removing some walls from my computer room. Now that my new and improved computer room is complete, I have continued on.

I have all the machines up and running but I can't see the four folding rigs from my main LAN. It is like I have two separate LANs. Each group can only see the machines that it shares a router with. However, all machines have internet connectivity and can file share with their own groups.

Any ideas how this could be fixed?

I have disabled DHCP on the second router and given it a different sub-mask. I tried giving it a static IP address, but then the four machine hooked to it loose their internet connection.
 

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make your secondary router on the same network as your primary ie. 192.168.0.x or whatever your primary network is, then if your primary has DHCP turned on then your machines should receive addresses from that, if they dont then assign them network addresses and setup up the primary router as the default gateway and dns.....

if you want the secondary router to be a separate network then you'll need to set it up as primary dns and gateway for the machines connected to it and assign the primary router as the default gateway in the secondary router....I havent really played around with this scenario that much, if I needed new ports I would just get a switch rather than a router.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by TedSexington

make your secondary router on the same network as your primary ie. 192.168.0.x or whatever your primary network is, then if your primary has DHCP turned on then your machines should receive addresses from that, if they dont then assign them network addresses and setup up the primary router as the default gateway and dns.....

if you want the secondary router to be a separate network then you'll need to set it up as primary dns and gateway for the machines connected to it and assign the primary router as the default gateway in the secondary router....I havent really played around with this scenario that much, if I needed new ports I would just get a switch rather than a router.

Alright I'll give this a try...just to clarify I do not want two LANs, I want one big LAN. I have two right now, but the IP's of the routers are different as I thought that was what was needed for it to work. I will try making them the same.
 
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