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Discussion Starter #1
I was using a router to control multiple computers on my network. When my roommate moved out he took his router, so I got a cheap ethernet switch to replace it. I fought it and fought it and then just reinstalled Windows. It worked on my machine (Win x64 Pro) and I'm on the 'net right now. But I've got two other computers that I've tried the same thing (reinstalling Windows XP) but neither one can connect to the internet. I thought I did everything exactly the same when setting up the network, but I can't get them to work.

If I right-click my connection and click Repair I get an error.

Quote:


The following steps of the repair operation failed:
Renewing IP address.

Where to start?
 

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The first thing to check would be if the network adapters are set to automatically detect the type of network 10/100/1000 or set to something specific... After that I'd look at the cables themselves to see if they might be the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've got the switch hooked to the cable modem, and all of the computers are hooked to the switch (including this one). I had to reinstall windows on this computer to get the internet to work at all. I even tried hooking straight to the cable modem, to no avail. It all worked after I reinstalled. I tried the same on the other two and I can't get anything to connect. They both spit the same error message.
 

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are they set to obtain ip address automatically?

i've never really heard of plugging a modem into a switch, so i dont know how that is going to work

but at my house, the computer that has the internet connected to it is then hooked into the switch, and uses internet connection sharing, and my other 2 comps hooked into the switch are getting internet from that computer

you may want to assign specific ip addresses to your computers on the switch, also, you may have to enter the ip address of your dns server to get internet
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Quote:


Originally Posted by farmboy30

are they set to obtain ip address automatically?

i've never really heard of plugging a modem into a switch, so i dont know how that is going to work

but at my house, the computer that has the internet connected to it is then hooked into the switch, and uses internet connection sharing, and my other 2 comps hooked into the switch are getting internet from that computer

you may want to assign specific ip addresses to your computers on the switch, also, you may have to enter the ip address of your dns server to get internet

So the main computer has 2 ethernet adapters, one going to the cable modem and the other to the switch?
 

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our internet is a little different, we get our internet from an isp that sends out a wireless signal, and we are 11 miles away from the antenna, then the antenna on our house is fed into a wan card, and then the computer is connected to the switch with an ethernet cable

so yes it does have 2 network adapters

and it would work for you to plug the cable modem into one, and the switch into the other
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Quote:


Originally Posted by farmboy30

our internet is a little different, we get our internet from an isp that sends out a wireless signal, and we are 11 miles away from the antenna, then the antenna on our house is fed into a wan card, and then the computer is connected to the switch with an ethernet cable

so yes it does have 2 network adapters

and it would work for you to plug the cable modem into one, and the switch into the other

I see. The main computer gets the internet and then shares it with the others. The way I had it set up before, all the computers hooked into the router and the router itself configured DNS, IP's, etc. I guess I need to get a different router.

BUT I still can't connect, even directly to the 'net without the switch inline. In other words, I take the LAN out of the picture and connect the computer directly to the cable modem, they still won't connect while the main computer will.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Quote:


Originally Posted by Ty Auchter

Take the computers to a repair shop and have them look at them.

Every computer shop that I've ever been to know less about computers than I do. I doubt there's anything they can do that I can't that would justify the money spent.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Pinhead-227

Every computer shop that I've ever been to know less about computers than I do. I doubt there's anything they can do that I can't that would justify the money spent.

Save your money. A computer shop can't "repair" your problem.
Your ISP is assigning an IP to the mac address that it first sees when you connect everything. So if you want one computer to connect directly to the modem, you would need to shut everything off, unplug the modem, hook everything together, wait like 5 minutes or so (maybe more) then plug in the modem and turn everything on. This will cause the modem to renew the IP and assign it to the computer that's plugged in. If you want to have everyone connect to the internet, you have to connect it so that the other computers gain access through the first computer. The "Set up a small or Home Office Network" Wizard in My Network Places will help you do this. It has to be run on every machine. This is because you're using a switch. If you just got a router with NAT, you could hook up the router to the modem and hook everyone else into that like you had before. Just setup NAT and DHCP and you're all set. Using a switch would require that each computer in the house has it's own IP address from the ISP, which usually costs more money per month, per IP. In the end, a router is usually cheaper and easier. Switches are great for LANs that don't connect to the internet.
 

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ISPs only usually allow 1 IP address per account. YOU HAVE TO HAVE A ROUTER FOR MORE THAN 1 PC TO CONNECT. A switch does not assign local (192.168) IPs, it only passes data. A router has a WAN port which takes the IP from the ISP and then passes the connection on to its LAN ports. It assigns the PCs on your LAN a LOCAL IP (192.168) and ROUTES the traffic accordingly. I have a cable modem hooked to a router, the router then feeds a switch which has all my PCs connected to it. They all have net access as the ROUTER takes care of the IP handling and as far as the ISP is concerned, there is only 1 IP used (by the routers WAN port)

EDIT: You can use the Home Networking Wizard also if you have a PC with 2 NICs. 1 NIC goes to ISP connection, other to uplink on switch. Plug all other units into switch. The 2 NIC PC will act as a router, but must always be on. A cheap 30 dollar router will use much less power and eliminate the hassle of dropping everyones connection when you have to reboot.
 
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Quote:


Originally Posted by Renegade5399

YOU HAVE TO HAVE A ROUTER FOR MORE THAN 1 PC TO CONNECT.

This is not quite true. As long as APIPA is enabled (which it is by default) the computers will assign themselves IP addresses (the 169.254. ones.) And as long as you assign the main computer as a residential gateway, this will alow for all others to connect to the internet through it. This way you don't need 2 NIC's, and you can indeed use a switch. I agree that the router is cheap, a lot easier, and offers the best options down the road, but a router is not the only way for multiple computers to connect. Hell, you can even do it with a hub if you really wanted to, though I don't know why you would.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Quote:


Originally Posted by The Llama

Save your money. A computer shop can't "repair" your problem.
Your ISP is assigning an IP to the mac address that it first sees when you connect everything. So if you want one computer to connect directly to the modem, you would need to shut everything off, unplug the modem, hook everything together, wait like 5 minutes or so (maybe more) then plug in the modem and turn everything on. This will cause the modem to renew the IP and assign it to the computer that's plugged in. If you want to have everyone connect to the internet, you have to connect it so that the other computers gain access through the first computer. The "Set up a small or Home Office Network" Wizard in My Network Places will help you do this. It has to be run on every machine. This is because you're using a switch. If you just got a router with NAT, you could hook up the router to the modem and hook everyone else into that like you had before. Just setup NAT and DHCP and you're all set. Using a switch would require that each computer in the house has it's own IP address from the ISP, which usually costs more money per month, per IP. In the end, a router is usually cheaper and easier. Switches are great for LANs that don't connect to the internet.

That verifies what I was assuming all along.

Quote:


Originally Posted by The Llama

This is not quite true. As long as APIPA is enabled (which it is by default) the computers will assign themselves IP addresses (the 169.254. ones.) And as long as you assign the main computer as a residential gateway, this will alow for all others to connect to the internet through it. This way you don't need 2 NIC's, and you can indeed use a switch. I agree that the router is cheap, a lot easier, and offers the best options down the road, but a router is not the only way for multiple computers to connect. Hell, you can even do it with a hub if you really wanted to, though I don't know why you would.

Ok, that makes sense too. I know how to set the main computer's IP as a residential gateway (just use it's IP address) but what do I have to do on this computer itself? Just go through the network setup wizard and select the "this computer connects to the internet. Others connect through the internet through this computer" option?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Pinhead-227

Ok, that makes sense too. I know how to set the main computer's IP as a residential gateway (just use it's IP address) but what do I have to do on this computer itself? Just go through the network setup wizard and select the "this computer connects to the internet. Others connect through the internet through this computer" option?

Yup. And then you have to manually allow for other computers to connect through that one. Go to my network places and right click on the connection that you use. Go to the advanced tab and check the box that says 'Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection.'
Now, realize that Windows is going to change your ip address, so you may need to repeat the steps we talked about above to get an internet connection.
You also need to run the network setup wizard on all of the other computers as well, to configure them as clients. If they're pre windows XP you need to create the CD at the end of the network setup on the server machine and use it to set up the rest of the computers.
 

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**** I tried the llama suggestion just for the heck of it and i'll be dammed. It works good! The router is easier, but if you have no $$, llama-fy
your network and it works. All my machines are XP Pro Corp SP2, so it worked like a charm.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Ok, maybe I'm not as smart as I thought. Could you give me a "step by step" overview? When I try to run the network setup wizard to have other computers connect through my main computer (the one with working internet) it says it cannot complete the network setup wizard because I only have one ethernet adapter on this system. How do I manually set this computer as a residential gateway? Do I also have to change settings in the Windows Firewall?
 

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Hey,

I'm in class til 9:30PM and I won't be able to write a long reply til late tomorrow. If Renegade5399 could post step by step what he did to make it work, that'd be pretty swell. Otherwise, I'll write it up tomorrow for you. Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I just added a second ethernet adapter to my spare computer and hooked it up that way (using internet connection sharing). Will this slow down my connection much? So far it's the only way I've been able to make them both connect to the net. Maybe I was doing something wrong... I don't know. I'm good with everything about computers except for networking. That part needs some polishing. But thanks a million for your help so far. Cookies for all.
 

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it may slow it down

but if im not mistaken, i think there is a property in the network settings that can determine how much bandwidth goes to what

on my setup at home, i have noticed that sometimes if the 2nd computer is downloading something, the gateway's connection may be a little slower than normal
 
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