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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the process of installing some new hard drives and will eventually be cloning XP to a 260GB drive, and attempting to RAID0 two smaller 10GB drives.

I formatted one, checked it out, all that, however there are still two files on it I can't delete.

"Recycled" which is just a picture of the recycling bin...I emptied it and it emptied something that I thought was in my desktop bin....I dunno.

And one folder called "system volume information" and inside is another folder called "restore43854398543eeee gobbledygook"

Inside THAT folder are a few folders called RP81, 82, 83- etc.

Inside each those are folders are files called "changlog.log.1, changelog.log.2, etc, and one file called "restore point file size"

I think these are old system restore points. I want this drive totally clean and blank, what can I do?
 

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Go into Start -> Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools -> System Restore.
To the left, click "System Restore Settings" and turn system restore off.
Press apply as this will purge all of system restore, restart the PC, and then you should hopefully be able to turn it back on.

This is a protected folder for System Restrore, and that is the only was to delete it, You will lose all your checkpoints as it will delete them all. However as soon as you have restarted the PC you should be able to turn it on.

This is the only way to delete system volume info files, trying to delete them using other methods might cause damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quote:


Originally Posted by z_one

Go into system restore, to the left, click "System Restore Settings" and turn system restore off.
Press apply as this will purge all of system restore, restart the PC, and then you should hopefully be able to turn it back on.

This is a protected folder for System Restrore, and that is the only was to delete it, You will lose all your checkpoints as it will delete them all. However as soon as you have restarted the PC you should be able to turn it on.

This is the only way to delete system volume info files, trying to delete them using other methods might cause damage.

Cool thanks! Does it matter that the drive and files I'm trying to delete is a nearly blank slave right now?

EDIT: Nevermind, I have the option to choose which drive has it on or off. Awesome! Thanks!
 

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Also, I'm about to put in this third drive. However on the IDE cable the one connecter labled "slave" is in use. There is another connector available but the word "zip" is on the cable.

I'm thinking I should just ignore that as it was assumed at one point zip drives would become pretty standard...I think...
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by MasterBillyQuizBoy

Also, I'm about to put in this third drive. However on the IDE cable the one connecter labled "slave" is in use. There is another connector available but the word "zip" is on the cable.

I'm thinking I should just ignore that as it was assumed at one point zip drives would become pretty standard...I think...

ZIP drives are normally available as internal or external units, using one of three interfaces:
1) The SCSI (Small Computer Standard Interface) interface is the fastest, most sophisticated, most expandable, and most expensive interface.
2) The IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) interface is a low-cost disk drive interface used by many desktop PC's. Most IDE devices are strictly internal.
3) The parallel port interface is popular for portable external devices such as external ZIP drives and scanners, because virtually every computer has a standard parallel port (usually used for printers). This makes things easy for people to transfer data between multiple computers by moving around their ZIP drive.

Concerning your IDE ZIP drive...
Quote from this website:

Quote:


Connecting The Drive:
I think it's usually best to connect an IDE Zip drive as master on the secondary port. Slaving a Zip drive to a CD drive may cause problems because some CD drives don't support a slave drive properly (among other things, it seems that this can cause the hard disk access light to remain steadily lit). While an IDE Zip may work OK on some systems when slaved to a CD drive, there are times when it won't. The configuration with the least potential for trouble would be to make the Zip master on the secondary port.
Since Zip drives are jumpered for slave by default, you will need to move the jumper(s) to the master setting when connecting one as such.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Quote:


Originally Posted by z_one

ZIP drives are normally available as internal or external units, using one of three interfaces:
1) The SCSI (Small Computer Standard Interface) interface is the fastest, most sophisticated, most expandable, and most expensive interface.
2) The IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) interface is a low-cost disk drive interface used by many desktop PC's. Most IDE devices are strictly internal.
3) The parallel port interface is popular for portable external devices such as external ZIP drives and scanners, because virtually every computer has a standard parallel port (usually used for printers). This makes things easy for people to transfer data between multiple computers by moving around their ZIP drive.

Concerning your IDE ZIP drive...
Quote from this website:

One thing, it's not a zip drive, it's a regular hard drive i want to slave, connected to two other drives on the same cable. none of them are attached to the cdrom/dvd drives.
 
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