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Crazy
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698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, so I switched from Bell to Shaw as my ISP. Reason was a huge increase in speeds. From 3.5mbits to 25mbits download. Upload from 0.6mbps to 2.5mbps. And it actually cost me less. Only downfall was dsl vs. cable. MOVING ON.
With Bell to change my external IP I just needed to restart the modem/router which was all-in one. Really easy, just go to router IP and hit reboot. Done you have a new external IP.

With Shaw I cannot reboot the modem without going down the stairs, unplugging it for about 15s, then plugging it back in. And it doesn't give me a different external IP. The only way successful to change my external IP so far has been to change my router's MAC then reboot router, then run down stairs and unplug and replug modem, then it normally works. And if I ever go back to that first MAC address it gives me the same IP back again as it had at first. And so on with the other MAC addresses.

Question is this: Is there an easier way to switch my external IP without calling my ISP and preferably without having to constantly change my MAC address? Also preferably without running stairs.
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Please help, thanks!
 

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Premium Member
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14,051 Posts
DSL will negotiate a new address when you negotiate a new PPPoE session.

Cable will give you the same DHCP assignment if you're still relatively active and somewhat within your DHCP lease time. Changing your MAC address will request a new IP address from DHCP as there is no existing correlation between your previously offered DHCP address and previous MAC address toward the new MAC address of the router.

Not sure why a separate external IP is important unless you get banned from things.
 

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Crazy
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698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
1 - Are you using a different router now than before?
2 - Which router is that.
3 - Are you talking about LAN IP or Internet IP? (Your post is confusing)
1. Same router as before. I had the Bell router disabled and was using my own.
2. The router is an Asus RT-N56U (Black Diamond)
3. Internet IP
Quote:
DSL will negotiate a new address when you negotiate a new PPPoE session.

Cable will give you the same DHCP assignment if you're still relatively active and somewhat within your DHCP lease time. Changing your MAC address will request a new IP address from DHCP as there is no existing correlation between your previously offered DHCP address and previous MAC address toward the new MAC address of the router.

Not sure why a separate external IP is important unless you get banned from things.
So is there any other way then what I am doing now?
Need a different external IP because my ex-friend knows my IP and keeps threatening to attack my network. As sad as that sounds. I don't even know if he knows how lol but rather not take a silly risk. Then upon doing so I realized how annoyingly difficult it is to change it as well as having to keep my router's MAC address different for it to keep the new ip.
 

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Linux > All
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1,681 Posts
Report him to the police. As he hasn't done anything yet there is nothing they could do but they might drop in and put the fear in him a little bit.
 

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What modem did Shaw give you? You could always log into the modem, using a web address, and find out if there is a release-renew command.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tadaen Sylvermane;15320599
Report him to the police. As he hasn't done anything yet there is nothing they could do but they might drop in and put the fear in him a little bit.
When he can't do anything to begin with (unless the OP personally made his network horribly insecure, intentionally), it's really a wasted effort.
 

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224 Posts
I am working on my CCNA, i am curious to why you would want to change your external ip address for internet use. Local addresses are private, so that means you did something bad lol. DHCP lease time and a session that is ongoing uses the same external address that was first assigned to it. Some ISP only have so many external addresses in their address pool so this is probably why. Reset your tcp/ip stack and see if that changes it. You can't get a static external address unless you are a large company or medium size business that needs it so customers can access their resources or services. You can only get this in a Service level agreement. No wait or do you mean your private Ip address?
 

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Premium Member
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZFedora;15320967
Edit: It doesn't assign a new ip address? That's strange.. Did you get a static ip?
It's due to the lease time. Shaw, like Rogers, is a cable provider. Roger's leases are up to 30 days long. Depending on location and IP needs.
 

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Crazy
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698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:
It's due to the lease time. Shaw, like Rogers, is a cable provider. Roger's leases are up to 30 days long. Depending on location and IP needs.
exactly.
Quote:
What modem did Shaw give you? You could always log into the modem, using a web address, and find out if there is a release-renew command.
I only wish. I tried. There seems to be no login to the modem using any sort of web interface. My router? Sure no problem logging in. But that doesn't help me. And I am unable to log into my modem in that fashion.
 

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2,470 Posts
Default settings on most routers block incoming requests, along with the default Windows Firewall settings. I highly doubt the average user would be able to "hack" your network. Plus change it once and you should be fine as long as you don't tell your EX the IP.

Linksys by default has Filter Anonymous Internet Requests on, which means that can't ping your IP, so they'll just get a Timed Out response and think there is nothing there.

I have my CCNA and my CCNA-Voice and with the VERY basic knowledge into networking, I wouldn't be able to just take a NAT'd IP and "hack" someone's network. But you can change your internal IP scheme if you're really paranoid. Mine is still 192.168.1.x but I have a limited number of DHCP IPs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyDiamond;15324488
exactly.

I only wish. I tried. There seems to be no login to the modem using any sort of web interface. My router? Sure no problem logging in. But that doesn't help me. And I am unable to log into my modem in that fashion.
Plug your PC directly into the modem and try again. Punch in the Modem's model into Google. See if there is a default IP and username/password.
 

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Crazy
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698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lxcivic2k1;15324585
Default settings on most routers block incoming requests, along with the default Windows Firewall settings. I highly doubt the average user would be able to "hack" your network. Plus change it once and you should be fine as long as you don't tell your EX the IP.

Linksys by default has Filter Anonymous Internet Requests on, which means that can't ping your IP, so they'll just get a Timed Out response and think there is nothing there.

I have my CCNA and my CCNA-Voice and with the VERY basic knowledge into networking, I wouldn't be able to just take a NAT'd IP and "hack" someone's network. But you can change your internal IP scheme if you're really paranoid. Mine is still 192.168.1.x but I have a limited number of DHCP IPs.
I know it is plenty safe. I do quite a bit of pentesting because I own servers. It's just the peace at mind. And as I said, I have been able to change my ip. Just trying to find an easier method for the future.
 
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