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PC Enthusiast
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3,510 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

moving to a new house soon and noticed the fiber connection into the house goes to a fiber converter before going to the ISP's router.
The ISP's router converts 2 VLAN channels to IP-TV and Internet.

I know the VLANS that are used from the ISP (101 and 102).
I can set the router to bridge mode, but would prefer to not use it at all.

Can anyone suggest a decent+cheap 5-8 port Gbit Switch that is managed and support those Vlan's?
Doesnt matter to me if its an EoL unit that I would need to find used.
 

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Premium Member
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6,664 Posts
Is the fiber being converted to Cat5e Ethernet with an RJ45 plug before it goes into the "modem"? Or from fiber to coax?

It sounds like if they are sending VLANs from their datacenter to houses then it is already in Ethernet form. That wouldnt be surprising as most fiber installs in the US I have seen send Ethernet right over the fiber now. If that is the case, then they really dont even have a modem like in the old days but just a simple router that can be entirely replaced.



As for cheap,. that depends entirely on your definition. In my opinion this is really cheap:
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-2x10...304742&sr=8-7&keywords=Netgear+managed+switch

But you may be looking for something along the lines of this in cost?
https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Ethe...304742&sr=8-6&keywords=Netgear+managed+switch
 

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PC Enthusiast
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3,510 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Is the fiber being converted to Cat5e Ethernet with an RJ45 plug before it goes into the "modem"? Or from fiber to coax?

It sounds like if they are sending VLANs from their datacenter to houses then it is already in Ethernet form. That wouldnt be surprising as most fiber installs in the US I have seen send Ethernet right over the fiber now. If that is the case, then they really dont even have a modem like in the old days but just a simple router that can be entirely replaced.



As for cheap,. that depends entirely on your definition. In my opinion this is really cheap:
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-2x10...304742&sr=8-7&keywords=Netgear+managed+switch

But you may be looking for something along the lines of this in cost?
https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Ethe...304742&sr=8-6&keywords=Netgear+managed+switch
The fiber converter outputs an RJ-45 port.
Signal is already in ethernet form, just masked with Tagged Vlan's.

Thanks, I'll check those out, 10Gbit is probably well in the future for me though.
 

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Premium Member
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Ethernet over RJ45 should mean you dont really have a modem then, just an ISP supplied router. If you get the router's WAN info from it and copy that into your own router then you should be able to completely replace the ISP supplied one.

You will need a router of some kind. If the ISP router is in bridge mode then you need your own behind it and then go from that to a switch. You wont be able to use a switch on your LAN without a router between you and the ISP to do the NAT and other routing and firewalling. So eityher replace the ISP router with your own, use the ISP router in its full feature mode, or set the ISP router to bridge and put your own router behind it. Then connect your switch to whatever router you are using.
 

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Typo Elemental
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3,223 Posts
If you'd like another suggestion, and you meet the following criteria:
- Not opposed to used hardware
- Willing to utilize CLI

I would strongly suggest you look at used Cisco gear, like the following switch:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cisco-Cata...abit-Ethernet-Switch-10-100-1000/192521306853

I have bought all of my networking gear off of ebay, and I have had good experiences so far. Sometimes you will have to initiate password recovery to "break in" to the device, but that usually isn't too bad.

I strongly recommend this kind of gear, as I used it to practice commands that helped me pass my CCNA cert. Definitely not entry level stuff, but worth the investment IMO.
 

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PC Enthusiast
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Discussion Starter #6
Ethernet over RJ45 should mean you dont really have a modem then, just an ISP supplied router. If you get the router's WAN info from it and copy that into your own router then you should be able to completely replace the ISP supplied one.

You will need a router of some kind. If the ISP router is in bridge mode then you need your own behind it and then go from that to a switch. You wont be able to use a switch on your LAN without a router between you and the ISP to do the NAT and other routing and firewalling. So eityher replace the ISP router with your own, use the ISP router in its full feature mode, or set the ISP router to bridge and put your own router behind it. Then connect your switch to whatever router you are using.
I do plan on using a Router, just not the ISP router.
The switch is just to get the tagged Ethernet LAN over to untagged, but it seems my dd-wrt router can do vlan on the wan port, so will try that first.


If you'd like another suggestion, and you meet the following criteria:
- Not opposed to used hardware
- Willing to utilize CLI

I would strongly suggest you look at used Cisco gear, like the following switch:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cisco-Cata...abit-Ethernet-Switch-10-100-1000/192521306853

I have bought all of my networking gear off of ebay, and I have had good experiences so far. Sometimes you will have to initiate password recovery to "break in" to the device, but that usually isn't too bad.

I strongly recommend this kind of gear, as I used it to practice commands that helped me pass my CCNA cert. Definitely not entry level stuff, but worth the investment IMO.
Not a big fan of Cisco in terms of configuring it, and not experienced with them.

Tried configuring a Cisco switch at our office, but the COM cable that came with it wasn't made correctly...
It would only allow for reading, not writing. Had to use an adapter a coworker made.

An HP switch I can configure with an eye closed. 🙂
 

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BGP is my favorite
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1,068 Posts
For cheap consumer switch, I like Netgear/TP-LINK. You can get models that allow you to set VLANs.

Netgear:
5 Port: https://www.netgear.com/support/product/GS105Ev2.aspx
8 Port: https://www.netgear.com/support/product/GS108Ev3.aspx

TP-LINK:
5 Port: https://www.tp-link.com/us/products/details/cat-41_TL-SG105E.html (I have one of these, works great)
8 Port: https://www.tp-link.com/us/products/details/cat-41_TL-SG108E.html

You can make the port from your ISP a trunk, allowing the two VLANs in, but you'd have to separate each one to a different port coming out and have the switch tag it. I think ideally you'd need to have your router be able to handle both, but maybe you don't need the IP-TV. Either way you don't need anything crazy like a Cisco device, etc.

An EdgeRouter X would be cool, then you wouldn't need the switch, however it's a little more complicated configuration. You'd also need to get an access point/make your current router into just an access point.
 

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Typo Elemental
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3,223 Posts
Not a big fan of Cisco in terms of configuring it, and not experienced with them.

Tried configuring a Cisco switch at our office, but the COM cable that came with it wasn't made correctly...
It would only allow for reading, not writing. Had to use an adapter a coworker made.

An HP switch I can configure with an eye closed. 🙂
Understood. I feel the same way about Dell switches tbh. :p

It's too bad you had a poor experience, I'm a bit of a fanboy of cisco equipment (except for the ASA's, those things are a pain in the arse).
 

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Super Moderator
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10,773 Posts
Understood. I feel the same way about Dell switches tbh. :p

It's too bad you had a poor experience, I'm a bit of a fanboy of cisco equipment (except for the ASA's, those things are a pain in the arse).



Amen to that! Cisco all the way though but anything that'll do VLANs will work here.
 
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