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Discussion Starter #1
Soo, my nephew's computer has this cooler, I bought it for him not even 2 years ago yet, and recently it has started to not spin well, and furthermore there is a grinding sound coming from the bearings.

Question here is if re-oiling it will be enough, or must I go a notch further and buy a new fan? I am actually kind of surprised that this problem has occurred so fast, I have a CM Hyper 212+ running strong 5 years now, knock on wood it's still as good as when I bought it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmdve View Post

Soo, my nephew's computer has this cooler, I bought it for him not even 2 years ago yet, and recently it has started to not spin, and furthermore there is a grinding sounds coming from the bearings.

Question here is if re-oiling it will be enough, or must I go a notch further and buy a new fan? I am actually kind of surprised that this problem has occurred so fast, I have a CM Hyper 212+ running strong 5 years now, knock on wood it's still as good as when I bought it.
Replace the fan. Those Cooler Master fans are good for just about 2 years... sometimes less. Plus, they're $11 on Amazon. Just buy the same one and get another 2 years or attach something with a longer lifespan like a Noctua.
 

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Don't buy a sleeve bearing fan for a heatsink. Count yourself lucky that you can hear it failing. It could have failed silently on you.

Buy ball bearing or FDB bearing fans for your heatsink. Newegg sells the Rosewill Hyperborea fans. The 120 and 140mm versions are not quiet. But neither are they noisy and they do have PWM control. Or splurge and go Noctua.

Don't cheap out with your heatsink.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

Don't buy a sleeve bearing fan for a heatsink. Count yourself lucky that you can hear it failing. It could have failed silently on you.

Buy ball bearing or FDB bearing fans for your heatsink. Newegg sells the Rosewill Hyperborea fans. The 120 and 140mm versions are not quiet. But neither are they noisy and they do have PWM control. Or splurge and go Noctua.

Don't cheap out with your heatsink.
How can you tell the difference between the two bearing types?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmdve View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

Don't buy a sleeve bearing fan for a heatsink. Count yourself lucky that you can hear it failing. It could have failed silently on you.

Buy ball bearing or FDB bearing fans for your heatsink. Newegg sells the Rosewill Hyperborea fans. The 120 and 140mm versions are not quiet. But neither are they noisy and they do have PWM control. Or splurge and go Noctua.

Don't cheap out with your heatsink.
How can you tell the difference between the two bearing types?
It's often one of the items on the label. If you are buying retail, it's part of the description of the fan, both in its listing and on the box.
 

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I got couple of the Noctua NF-P12-1300. It's super quiet and its ball bearing. Down side is a little expensive for a fan. ($18)
 

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I've been used the 212 Plus and also tried the stock fan Blade Master, XtraFlo (same as the 212 Evo), Akasa Viper and Cooler Master Silencio FP.

Despite the color and speed range, the Vipers, Apaches and Hyperborea are all the same.

The Viper is a good fan spinning under 1300 rpm and seems to shift a good amount of air.
The bearing noise of the Vipers seem better than the Blade Master and the XtraFlo but they're still audible.

I would myself pick the Silencio FP, it's almost inaudible at full blast.
It rated at 1400 rpm but my two samples can reach about 1600 rpm.

The Hyperborea is rated at 1300 rpm but my Vipers at this speed aren't that quiet.
 

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Sure you can try applying some oil. Nothing really wrong with sleeve bearings unless the fan is of crappy quality.
 

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Silencio is sleeve, IIRC.

Nothing wrong with sleeve bearings -- for case fans. I require more reliability on my heatsinks. That would be true even for an inexpensive heatsink like the 212. That's why I use Noctuas.

Viper, Apache, Hyperborea. All have the same impeller, but unless you know for a fact the the motor and bearing are the same, you know nothing about the fans' innards.

Case in point: the old Scythe Slip Stream fans were sleeve bearings, and fine case fans. The new Slip Stream DB have ball bearings. They are now suitable for any kind of work. But I have held them side by side and I could see no external differences apart from the labels.

FDB = Fluid Dynamic Bearings. Similar is HDB - Hydro Dynamic Bearings. Noctua uses SSO/SSO2. Etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

Silencio is sleeve, IIRC.

FDB = Fluid Dynamic Bearings. Similar is HDB - Hydro Dynamic Bearings. Noctua uses SSO/SSO2. Etc.
Thanks for your input.

I mean that Silencio FP 120 PWM here .

Do you mean that LDB is actually a sleeve bearing?

From I recall from Mr Tot that old SSO (not the newer SSO2) is actually a sleeve bearing and due the project is prone to leaking.
Am I right with that?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsai View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

Silencio is sleeve, IIRC.

FDB = Fluid Dynamic Bearings. Similar is HDB - Hydro Dynamic Bearings. Noctua uses SSO/SSO2. Etc.
Thanks for your input.

I mean that Silencio FP 120 PWM here .

Do you mean that LDB is actually a sleeve bearing?

From I recall from Mr Tot that old SSO (not the newer SSO2) is actually a sleeve bearing and due the project is prone to leaking.
Am I right with that?
All the "dynamic" bearings -- FDB, HDB, LDB, SSO, etc. -- are sealed sleeve bearings of some sort. I've taken apart a redux NF-P14, and its SSO bearing is indeed just a sleeve bearing.

That fan looks good for its intended purpose. When I tested one, it had difficulty pushing through a rad. That was a prototype, but the impeller is the same. Still, for the 212 it would be just right.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

All the "dynamic" bearings -- FDB, HDB, LDB, SSO, etc. -- are sealed sleeve bearings of some sort. I've taken apart a redux NF-P14, and its SSO bearing is indeed just a sleeve bearing.

That fan looks good for its intended purpose. When I tested one, it had difficulty pushing through a rad. That was a prototype, but the impeller is the same. Still, for the 212 it would be just right.
Thanks again. REP+

I know that Mr Tot don't like the SSO neither the Cougar Dual-X (Hong Sheng) because he considers that bearings just another sleeve implementation.

Can I consider that CM's LDB as good/reliable as Corsair SP120, Cougar Vortex HDB (Power Logic), Thermalright FDB or it's just like the Noctua's SSO or Hong Sheng's implementation?
 

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If a computer fan is not ball bearing it is a varient of a sleeve bearing with a fancy name. There is nothing wrong with good quality sleeve bearings. But the key words are 'good quality'. A good quality sleeve bearing will last longer than a poor quality ball bearing.

Most all of my fans are good quality sleeve bearings that almost never have one go bad .. and several have been in use for many many years .. in both horizontal and vertical orientation .. with no problems at all. My old Define R2 has a TY140 on the bottom intake that has been running for as long as I've had the case and never given me anything but quiet airflow.
 

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Agreed!

My only cons is supporting companies lying about it's bearing, listing it as "premium" quality bearing but still facing the same issues of the sleeve bearing.

Example: The Xigmatek XAF fan series reviewed here.

I tested the Silencios with my Hyper 212 and Seidon 120.
At the same rpm, they perform as good as my other fans, being much quieter.

Now I'm just curious how good is that Silencio's LDB bearing.
I was thought the Silencio's LDB bearing would be considered a high end bearing.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsai View Post

Agreed!

My only cons is supporting companies lying about it's bearing, listing it as "premium" quality bearing but still facing the same issues of the sleeve bearing.

Example: The Xigmatek XAF fan series reviewed here.

I tested the Silencios with my Hyper 212 and Seidon 120.
At the same rpm, they perform as good as my other fans, being much quieter.

Now I'm just curious how good is that Silencio's LDB bearing.
I was thought the Silencio's LDB bearing would be considered a high end bearing.
It would seem saying 'premium' quality bearing is much more truthful than slightly modifying sleeve bearings and giving them fancy three and four word names that are nothing but advertising hype. Problem is that once the first company does this, and the second one follows suit, it's the snowball starting the avalanche. Everyone else has to follow suit to keep market share. The real problem is quality of product is not as important as it's advertising, and most advertising is more hype than fact. The crazy sales of CLCs is a perfect example of this. Good air cooling is cheaper, more dependable, quieter, etc, but CLC is outselling air .. not because it better product, but because it was and is advertised as being better .. including 'reviews' that are improperly done and/or sponsored by CLC suppliers showing CLC outperforming air .. which is and has been proven untrue in many well done and documented tests.

But back to bearings;
For all intent and purpose, we have 2 kinds of bearing fans. Ball and Sleeve. It doesn't matter what fancy names fan companies put name there sleeve bearings, they are still in the sleeve bearing family. Fluid bearings are basically just sophisticated sleeve bearings with slightly different ways of using the lubricant in the space between the bearing sleeve and shaft. The lubricant between the shaft and sleeve is what they are referring to when the call these bearings 'Fluid Dynamic Bearing". But almost all sleeve bearings require lubricant too. After all, lubrication is what keeps bearings from getting noisy and seizing .. even ball bearings. tongue.gif

Bottom line is the quality of bearing is far more important than what kind of bearing it is, be it ball or sleeve. Poor quality ball bearings will fail before good quality sleeve bearings. Yes, a good ball bearing has a longer life expectancy, but we are talking 80,000 to 95,000 hours @ 25c, or 52,000 to 75,000 hours @ 40c. That is almost 6 years of use without ever being turned off. How many of us will be using the fans we buy now for that many years?
 
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Good fans are not all expensive. There are many good for less than a tenner.
 
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