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Okay, I want to get linux, but I dont know why I should. I never get viruses in windows, it runs fast, windows xp is my home within a home.

Im dual booting XP Pro SP2 and Vista Ultimate SP1 atm.

Ive used a Ubuntu Live CD before, but there was nothing that like, wowed me to triple boot it.

What may convince me to use it is: sweet visual things, easy way to learn linux, how to install drivers :O, things that it can do but not windows.

Currently I use these programs a lot: firefox, AIM pro, my Razer driver, Steam, Roboform, and RapidShare Download manager.

Linux being able to use those programs is a big plus!

You may try and convert me to the Penguin!
 

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You can still use Firefox. As for the rest, there are tons of open sourced alternatives.

Make a Linux Mint liveCD and give that a shot. It looks better than Ubuntu, and I found it easier to use when switching between it and Windows OS's.
 

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Well, one thing I enjoy about linux in general is that it doesn't treat me like I dont know what I'm doing.

When I first installed Vista on my sig rig, I had to take "ownership" of my hard drive in order to be able to mess with anything. I was never prompted for a password, I was just flat out denied access to anything except what was in C:/Program Files/ and C:/Program Files (x86)/. Linux doesn't do that. The worst thing it does is prompt you for your root password so that unauthorized users can't damage any system files.

All of the desktop effects that come with Compiz are pretty sweet, but they tend to not work very well with ATI cards if you wanna watch movies. Plus, Package Managers freaking rule.

Its just a different experience. Like the above poster said, chances are good that you can find free software that will replace everything you use in windows, and if not, there's always WINE.

Its just up to you. If your serious about atleast giving it a shot, click on the "Lattyware's Linux Challenge" link in my sig. It'll give a better idea of what to expect and all that.

Best of luck!
 

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I like using programs with code that is optimized for my processor and not for the old I386s. Yay for optimized code in Linux n.n
 

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^ as above.

it's a much more pleasant experience IMHO. the visual effects (compiz-fusion) cream all over vista's. firefox comes with most distributions, ubuntu included, steam and source games except L4D run pretty well and without too many issues, and i don't know or use the other progs so i cannot help you there. i have never had any issues with my razer krait but i don't actually use the drivers.

i'd be taking Linux Mint for a spin.
 

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If you are willing to make it work, go for it. Get ready for a week or two of tweaking and getting it how you want. I spent the last two days downloading distros and trying them. Only one worked with my system (go figure) and even then, I didn't like the distro. I'd love to get Linux back on my computer but for now it isn't worth the hassle for me.
 

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firefox, AIM pro, my Razer driver, Steam, Roboform, and RapidShare Download manager.

Firefox is on Linux
AIM: Pidgin is great for IMs
Razer: My Deathadder works fine in Ubuntu (although I haven't bothered to setup the on-the-fly DPI change)
Roboform: You can probably replace it with other programs, http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=202896 came up on google.
RS Manager: If there isn't an alternative, it may run through WINE, or you can setup a virtual machine for it.
 

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Because it's Open Source.

There's a reason why the acronym for Operating System is OS and not MS
 

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I'm not going to convince you to use Linux. I'm going to ask you why you even need to.

Unless you have a good reason to use Linux, there's no point in "switching"

If you like to game, use Windows, if you want stuff to be easy to install and easy to use, Use Windows, if you want things to be fairly simple to fix with easy to follow instructions, use Windows.

Linux is for servers and people with programming knowledge. Unless you own a server or own some programming knowledge (not PHP, more like C++) then you have no business running Linux software.

No, do not reply with "blah blah X program is easy to use, whinge whinge" anyone, because it's not. Not a single Linux program I've come across in the last 5 years has been anywhere near easy to use. Synaptec style installations are easy, but the common spiel from Linux nerds is they're the be all and end all of Installations. News flash: Only if you know what you're doing! Driver support is terrible, sure this is the fault of the vendors and not of Linux programming, but once a driver is released, you have to wait for it to be released into your lazy list of things to install (with crazy names that barely relate to the program and look like they were written by a 9 year old "wa-mmd-01.srv" means nothing to me) Failing using the installation method above, you can compile your own driver! Woo, first, before you can do that, you need a crash course in the Linux terminal! That will take a good few hours!

Do not "switch" to Linux because it seems to be the 'in' thing for techies like ourselves. Switch because you can create programs or need to run a server.
 

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^

Dislike Linux (of all types) much? You do not have to be a programmer to use Linux. You do not need to be running a server to use Linux. Ubuntu 8.04 and above is so stupid easy to use for the average person, not using it is almost harder. And by average, I do not mean us. If you know what BIOS is an acronym for... Actually, if you know that BIOS is an acronym, you can easily use Linux.

Now, I do not mean to say there is no learning curve, because there is. Learning the directory structuring was the most difficult for me, and is still the most intimidating. You can think of the Terminal just like you can as the Windows DOS prompt. You can use it, and you will: for some things. Will you use it every day? Of course not!

To the OP: You do not need to be convinced to try Linux (of any flavor), just try it. If you do not yet know how to dual boot, do a tad bit of research on the subject, the Live CD's make the process VERY simple to do. You can even install Ubuntu in Windows, just like every other program or game, and then remove it without any issues at all if it turns out you don't like it.

my2c
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by kneeki View Post
^

Dislike Linux (of all types) much? You do not have to be a programmer to use Linux. You do not need to be running a server to use Linux. Ubuntu 8.04 and above is so stupid easy to use for the average person, not using it is almost harder. And by average, I do not mean us. If you know what BIOS is an acronym for... Actually, if you know that BIOS is an acronym, you can easily use Linux.

Now, I do not mean to say there is no learning curve, because there is. Learning the directory structuring was the most difficult for me, and is still the most intimidating. You can think of the Terminal just like you can as the Windows DOS prompt. You can use it, and you will: for some things. Will you use it every day? Of course not!

To the OP: You do not need to be convinced to try Linux (of any flavor), just try it. If you do not yet know how to dual boot, do a tad bit of research on the subject, the Live CD's make the process VERY simple to do. You can even install Ubuntu in Windows, just like every other program or game, and then remove it without any issues at all if it turns out you don't like it.

my2c
He is just trolling, the post is too stupid to be anything else.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Kryten View Post
I'm not going to convince you to use Linux. I'm going to ask you why you even need to.

Unless you have a good reason to use Linux, there's no point in "switching"

If you like to game, use Windows, if you want stuff to be easy to install and easy to use, Use Windows, if you want things to be fairly simple to fix with easy to follow instructions, use Windows.

Linux is for servers and people with programming knowledge. Unless you own a server or own some programming knowledge (not PHP, more like C++) then you have no business running Linux software.

No, do not reply with "blah blah X program is easy to use, whinge whinge" anyone, because it's not. Not a single Linux program I've come across in the last 5 years has been anywhere near easy to use. Synaptec style installations are easy, but the common spiel from Linux nerds is they're the be all and end all of Installations. News flash: Only if you know what you're doing! Driver support is terrible, sure this is the fault of the vendors and not of Linux programming, but once a driver is released, you have to wait for it to be released into your lazy list of things to install (with crazy names that barely relate to the program and look like they were written by a 9 year old "wa-mmd-01.srv" means nothing to me) Failing using the installation method above, you can compile your own driver! Woo, first, before you can do that, you need a crash course in the Linux terminal! That will take a good few hours!

Do not "switch" to Linux because it seems to be the 'in' thing for techies like ourselves. Switch because you can create programs or need to run a server.
right. since error10 is not here atm to bring your arguments into line i will have to.

Quote:
if you want stuff to be easy to install and easy to use, Use Windows,
i have to say, using a package manager like synaptic or even the command line is faster, and easier than having to manually search for, and then install programs in windows. have you used the Ubuntu repositories? it's a lot easier to find an alternative program from there than having to search the Net... not to mention updating programs can be done a lot quicker, rather than having to uninstall, and then install again, and in some cases this requires a reboot - an event that is rare in linux unless the kernel is updated. and do we need to go on to mention how long windows updates can take?

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Linux is for servers and people with programming knowledge. Unless you own a server or own some programming knowledge (not PHP, more like C++) then you have no business running Linux software.
you're wrong. Linux is for anyone. look at ubuntu. you don't need programming knowledge to install or run ubuntu. if i take linux to mean open source, then that makes it even worse, as a lot of open source programs are used by a LOT of windows users. need i mention firefox / VLC?

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Not a single Linux program I've come across in the last 5 years has been anywhere near easy to use.
as linux is a kernel and not a program, i'll take 'linux program' to mean a program that can commonly be found on a linux system. in this case, firefox. i am pretty sure firefox is easy to use.

i HATE dos. i have never liked using command lines, - they scare me. but i must say that the more i use Linux, the more i get used to the command line, and i am starting to see that it is actually faster to do some things via the command line.

Quote:
Synaptic style installations are easy, but the common spiel from Linux nerds is they're the be all and end all of Installations. News flash: Only if you know what you're doing!
if you are running linux it is fair to assume you are going to know about the package manager, and even if you don't, it remains very very easy to use. (by package manager i mean apt, and synaptic). for example, if you see the following command, what do you think that it does?

sudo apt install [program name]
sudo apt remove [program name]

it seems fairly obvious to me that that command means, install firefox, and the one below it means remove firefox. i just asked a friend with no experience of linux, the same question, and he came to the same conclusion i did without me telling him the meaning of sudo and apt. i fail to see how that is difficult. in any event, you should only be installing .deb files / .rpm files from websites, directly onto your system instead of using the repositories, if you know what you're doing

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Driver support is terrible, sure this is the fault of the vendors and not of Linux programming, but once a driver is released, you have to wait for it to be released into your lazy list of things to install
for some things, yes, driver support is terrible, but it improves daily. your comments on having to wait to install it is ENTIRELY dependent on you, however. my Mint install is set to check for updates every 5 mins, and i know if there is a new update by looking at the icon.

in fact, running the update from the command line is one of the things i find easier than doing via the GUI, and it is incidentally, quicker than installing or removing a program

sudo apt update

'sides, it's a lot more secure to prompt the installation of the updates yourself, than have it done without your knowledge, and thus risk your computer's security. in any event, if something breaks, you know which update will have caused it, rather than having a myriad list. look at what happened to someone on here yesterday

Quote:
(with crazy names that barely relate to the program and look like they were written by a 9 year old "wa-mmd-01.srv" means nothing to me)
that is ridiculous but anyways. it looks nothing like any command i have seen - usually the commands are a lot simpler than that, as i explained above. in any event. the most complicated package manager i have used thus far, is pacman, from Arch, and i rest my case here by saying, if it looks as complicated as that, then read up on it. remember that you don't have to read up on how to manipulate .exes and .msi's because you did at one point . reading how to interpret it shouldn't take long, in this day where the internet is so prevalent... FWIW, ALVIS1006WWBIT.cfg means nothing to me, but it is inside my windows system folder.

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Failing using the installation method above, you can compile your own driver!
i haven't had to compile a single driver, program, or utility in the now 8 months i have been using Linux. not once. by the way, compiling is good - it makes things run faster as they will be optimised for your own system. sounds like a habit an overclocker would have, right? legacy support is not always necessary, and it is one of the mixed blessings of microsoft's Windows.

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Woo, first, before you can do that, you need a crash course in the Linux terminal! That will take a good few hours!
i somehow doubt that there is not one GUI-based compilation tool available, and in any event, with that process will come learning and that knowledge can be used in future. that said, the command line is not as daunting as you make it out to be. i hopefully showed that above. it actually can end up being faster for doing some things.

did you know that typing the word firefox into a command line opens firefox?

it sounds to me like you're just trying to justify staying inside your comfort zone and not learn something new, by flinging around very baseless and often incorrect statements. if that works for you, then fine. as for me, i am very glad i got rid of that attitude and tried linux. i know i'm not the only one.
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Kryten View Post
I'm not going to convince you to use Linux. I'm going to ask you why you even need to.

Unless you have a good reason to use Linux, there's no point in "switching"

If you like to game, use Windows, if you want stuff to be easy to install and easy to use, Use Windows, if you want things to be fairly simple to fix with easy to follow instructions, use Windows.

Linux is for servers and people with programming knowledge. Unless you own a server or own some programming knowledge (not PHP, more like C++) then you have no business running Linux software.

No, do not reply with "blah blah X program is easy to use, whinge whinge" anyone, because it's not. Not a single Linux program I've come across in the last 5 years has been anywhere near easy to use. Synaptec style installations are easy, but the common spiel from Linux nerds is they're the be all and end all of Installations. News flash: Only if you know what you're doing! Driver support is terrible, sure this is the fault of the vendors and not of Linux programming, but once a driver is released, you have to wait for it to be released into your lazy list of things to install (with crazy names that barely relate to the program and look like they were written by a 9 year old "wa-mmd-01.srv" means nothing to me) Failing using the installation method above, you can compile your own driver! Woo, first, before you can do that, you need a crash course in the Linux terminal! That will take a good few hours!

Do not "switch" to Linux because it seems to be the 'in' thing for techies like ourselves. Switch because you can create programs or need to run a server.
Meh. Not to troll back, but that's why your title is PC Gamer. If your interest on a computer is solely to game, of course linux will sound less appealing, even though it's getting there. Linux distros must have improved a great deal since last time you've tried Linux, something like Linux Mint which is practically working right out of the box.

It's a great thing to learn new things... You have to be willing to learn.
 

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I can't be arsed to multiquote, but I feel a few of you commited to post a fair amount so I'll honour you all back.

My usertitle says PC Gamer because I don't have an Overclocked account, thus the ability to change that, and I'm also into enthusiast techology because I like to play PC games. ATI fan, Intel fan, AMD fan and Nvidia fan didn't really apply to me and neither did many of the others. I guess Audiophile is kind of fitting.

I have tried Ubuntu, Fedora and SuSe's repositories. Even dabbled with ones not included with standard installations. I know how to use Linux I just don't like how it works, or rather, how it requires you to use it. Everytime I use it get I feel like I'm transported back to 1998 (only my PC doesn't take 3 hours to open My Computer) A lot of what I said isn't wrong, it's just opinionated and more valuable to me, but the point of an opinion is that there's always different ones and you can't walk around with your ears shut.

Finally, I'm not trolling.
 

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Linux is like anything else, it has its place. Some people like it, some people don't. Quite honestly, it is much easier to find support in Linux. By that I mean there are a boat load of forums, chat rooms, etc. You won't ever be left without help, that much is certain.

Depending on what you have, hardware support varies. Most parts nowadays have full support. Obscure stuff or very proprietary components have varying support.

The other thing that is nice is that you don't need a 64bit system to use more than 4GB ram. Mind you I realize that 4GB ram is not all that beneficial, but it's a nice function for later on.

As a gamer gal, I love Windows, however I love the efficiency and optimization Linux has. As of right now, only two games I play don't work well in Linux; Maple Story and Crysis. Crysis works but not well enough under emulation to run high settings without lag. Maple Story doesn't work at all because Wine sucks at running Game Guard, lol.

Finally, I agree with Kryten in the sense that you can't walk around with your ears closed. That works in both directions, you can't blindly diss Linux if you don't know it well or if your knowledge of it is outdated, but you also can't be a purist about it just because you like it. I also agree that if you need justification that doesn't come from your own mind, you probably might want to hold off switching over. I also agree with kneeki in the sense that you can't feel intimidated by it either. You lose nothing by trying it out and if you don't like it, it's very easy to switch back, just takes a little bit of time and a lack of laziness ^.~

Hope this helps a bit.
 

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Linux is free and you can near enough do what you want with it.
 
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