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i7 1336 setup or i7 1155 setup?

  • i7 Bloomfield/Gulftown (i7 950)

    Votes: 9 16.7%
  • i7 Sandy Bridge (2600k)

    Votes: 31 57.4%
  • Wait for the Ivy Bridges

    Votes: 14 25.9%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been looking in the market to buy a new setup for a while now. For the longest time, I had my sights set on a i7 950. But then Intel decides to release their new second generation Sandy Bridge i7 processors, which has left me with other choices aside from the 950 I've been wanting for so long.

I've done some searching on the interwebs, and I've read up on some things, such as comparisons and benchmarks between the two processors. But the results seem skewed for certain sites, so I'm left in the dust with no viable benchmarking results or comparisons.

I know that the 1155 processors are meant to replace the 1156s and aren't really meant to replace the 1366 CPUs. I also realize that the Sandy Bridge series is meant to be a mainstream consumer product, whereas the Bloomfield/Gulftown series is meant to be an enthusiast consumer product. However, from what I've gathered, the 2600ks are very much comparable to a lot of the 1336s. Some even state that the 2600ks are comparable to the i7 980x due to its advanced overclocking capabilities. Although I'm finding this hard to believe since the Gulftown 980xs are six-core processors, as opposed to the four-core Sandy Bridge processors.

Other things I've gathered is that the performance of the 2600ks vary greatly on the motherboards that are coupled with it (more so than your standard CPU/Mobo coupling). Such as the integrated graphics not working, the CPU multiplier not working, etc. Making research for the motherboards that much more tedious.

The new 2011 (socket type) Ivy Bridge series will surely knock the last gen enthusiast i7s out of the ball park, but I'm not sure if I'm willing to wait a whole year for them to release.

tl;dr: So, for those of you familiar with all the latest and greatest computer technology has to offer, I ask you: Should I buy a 1366 Bloomfield setup (Core i7 950) and then upgrade to a Gulftown processor later down the road (Core i7 Extreme) or should I get a 1155 2600k setup? Or should I really wait a whole year for the new Ivy Bridges?

Note: I'll mostly use it for high-end gaming and some simple video/photo editing. I have a Radeon 6870 that I plan on SLi'ng sometime in the near future, if that makes any difference.

The only reason I'd get the 950 is because of the 1366 socket. Eventually, those 980xs are going to go down in price. And when they do, I'm going to get one (if I go the 1366 route) I'm just wondering if those 980x have a huge significant advantage over the 2600ks. And whether or not it's worth sticking to the older 1366 technology.
 

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1336? It's 1366.

I'd opt for the newer 2600k, hearing good things of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
^ Indeed it is. I'm not sure why I said 1336.

What kind of things? I'd like as much specifics as possible.

I really need a new setup as soon as possible. I'm not sure how stable my current setup is (don't ask). If I'm to wait for the Ivy Bridges, I'm going to need some pretty damn good reasons. So for those of you who're voting wait for Ivy Bridge, I'd like to hear your thoughts on the matter.
 

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I have both a 980X Gulftown and a 2500K Sandy Bridge in my [email protected] farm. They run 100% 24x7. I have studied numerous reviews and been briefed by Intel. Here's how I would build a decision tree for you:

Raw CPU Power: A 2500K is about the same as an i7-930 in folding. That's better than any Core 2, but about 75% of an i7-870 (socket 1156). Threads matter, and 2500K does not have them.

One-Monitor Gamer If you're a gamer with a single video card and one monitor up to 1080p, then Sandy Bridge P67 will suit you fine. If you need more than two graphics cards, you're probably going to hit a PCIe barrier; look to socket 1366 for more PCIe options.

Overclocker Sandy Bridge chips overclock on air up to about 5 GHz. Say, 4+ GHz at near stock voltages (you do want your chip to still work in a year, I presume). Takes about 2 minutes to bump the multipliers, and you're off to the races. Tradeoff: you have to buy a P67 motherboard and a K-suffix chip; you lose the neat video transcoding QuickSync capabilities available in a no-overclock-allowed H67 motherboard with integrated graphics. Or wait until February when the Z67 motherboards come out that support integrated graphics and K-sufffix overclocking. Confused? Yes, Intel did fog that up.

Video Processing Sandy Bridge, for sure, for video transcoding recorded TV down to iPhone, for example. Transcoding is hardware-assisted on Sandy Bridge. But socket 1366 for serious video editing/processing applications that need more memory, memory bandwidth, and hyperthreading.

Notebooks Sandy Bridge quad core will kill Arrandale on performance per watt. Make sure you get a quad-code SB to enjoy the experience.

General Multitasking Sandy Bridge is like a turbo four-cylinder to the V8 of Core i7 and the V12 of a 980X Gulftown. Most desk workers including compute-hogs will like the quiet performance capabilities of Sandy Bridge.

Value Tons of computing value in Sandy Bridge. In a few weeks, when intro prices drop down to lower levels, you'll get almost all of 1366 performance, or more, for less dollars. SB totally obsoletes socket 1156 and 775 on value.

Hope that helps,
- Catalina588
 

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Excellent post, however perhaps the video transcoding portion does not apply to him. if he has a decent video card they all do that as well, typically faster than the intel graphics as well.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catalina588;11983538
I have both a 980X Gulftown and a 2500K Sandy Bridge in my [email protected] farm. They run 100% 24x7. I have studied numerous reviews and been briefed by Intel. Here's how I would build a decision tree for you:

Raw CPU Power: A 2500K is about the same as an i7-930 in folding. That's better than any Core 2, but about 75% of an i7-870 (socket 1156). Threads matter, and 2500K does not have them.

One-Monitor Gamer If you're a gamer with a single video card and one monitor up to 1080p, then Sandy Bridge P67 will suit you fine. If you need more than two graphics cards, you're probably going to hit a PCIe barrier; look to socket 1366 for more PCIe options.

Overclocker Sandy Bridge chips overclock on air up to about 5 GHz. Say, 4+ GHz at near stock voltages (you do want your chip to still work in a year, I presume). Takes about 2 minutes to bump the multipliers, and you're off to the races. Tradeoff: you have to buy a P67 motherboard and a K-suffix chip; you lose the neat video transcoding QuickSync capabilities available in a no-overclock-allowed H67 motherboard with integrated graphics. Or wait until February when the Z67 motherboards come out that support integrated graphics and K-sufffix overclocking. Confused? Yes, Intel did fog that up.

Video Processing Sandy Bridge, for sure, for video transcoding recorded TV down to iPhone, for example. Transcoding is hardware-assisted on Sandy Bridge. But socket 1366 for serious video editing/processing applications that need more memory, memory bandwidth, and hyperthreading.

Notebooks Sandy Bridge quad core will kill Arrandale on performance per watt. Make sure you get a quad-code SB to enjoy the experience.

General Multitasking Sandy Bridge is like a turbo four-cylinder to the V8 of Core i7 and the V12 of a 980X Gulftown. Most desk workers including compute-hogs will like the quiet performance capabilities of Sandy Bridge.

Value Tons of computing value in Sandy Bridge. In a few weeks, when intro prices drop down to lower levels, you'll get almost all of 1366 performance, or more, for less dollars. SB totally obsoletes socket 1156 and 775 on value.

Hope that helps,
- Catalina588
absolutely correct......pretty good for a new comer.....
repped+++.....
thumb.gif
 

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Honestly, the way i see it - if u already have 1366 based pc - than there is no reason to upgrade cause real life performance difference is too low to notice, but if you are building new system from the scratch - SB is the way to go. Why? Much Much lower power consumption and temperatures:
View attachment 189709
Personally I have brand new factory sealed i7 960 (3.2Ghz) that i bought about month ago. I decided to attempt to sell it to buy SB but if it doesn't sell soon enough i'll just keep it with no regrets cause with SB i wouldn't gain much performance anyways.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekg84;11987402
Honestly, the way i see it - if u already have 1366 based pc - than there is no reason to upgrade cause real life performance difference is too low to notice, but if you are building new system from the scratch - SB is the way to go. Why? Much Much lower power consumption and temperatures:
View attachment 189709
Personally I have brand new factory sealed i7 960 (3.2Ghz) that i bought about month ago. I decided to attempt to sell it to buy SB but if it doesn't sell soon enough i'll just keep it with no regrets cause with SB i wouldn't gain much performance anyways.
What's your opinion on AM3 to 1155? =P
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LethalRise750;11987413
What's your opinion on AM3 to 1155? =P
Upgrade from am3 to 1155? I think its reasonable, am3 cpus, even 6-core ones in general are slower than lynnfields. Moving from am3 to 1155 would give significant boost in performance therefore IMO am3 to 1155 is a good idea.
 

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If you were to buy a system now, I'd definitely get the i7 2600K Sandy Bridge. However, if you can hold out a bit without dwelling into waiting syndrome (if you continue to wait forever, you'll see better and better things coming out, of course, but you'll never have anything...), the true power of Intel's new processors will be shown later in 2011. I think the second half though so it's still a while. You'll be seeing a new set of new generation CPUs with six and eight cores as well as quad channel memory. In my opinion those are the ones truly worth waiting for!
Another good thing is that AMD will be unleashing their Bulldozer CPUs at around the same time so you'll have a better range of choice regardless.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekg84;11987402
Honestly, the way i see it - if u already have 1366 based pc - than there is no reason to upgrade cause real life performance difference is too low to notice, but if you are building new system from the scratch - SB is the way to go. Why? Much Much lower power consumption and temperatures:
View attachment 189709
Personally I have brand new factory sealed i7 960 (3.2Ghz) that i bought about month ago. I decided to attempt to sell it to buy SB but if it doesn't sell soon enough i'll just keep it with no regrets cause with SB i wouldn't gain much performance anyways.
used a 1366 i7 950 4ghz.
its just I liked to get the new tech and 5ghz is more fun.
I had a old x58 MB so I desired the usb3 and sata and it just made sense to go sb.
smile.gif

jife3n.jpg
 

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So are we saying then, that for a full time video-encoding system that I will be building in 6 weeks, that I should be staying with an i7 950 or going to a 2600K on the Z67 board?

My reading to date has been leading me toward the Z67 board-2600K combo as being significantly superior.

If this is not going to be the case... I might as well get on with the build now and not wait.
 

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for a new build right now you should go SB.

the only reason to go 1366 is if you get a tremendous deal on the cpu & board.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Catalina588
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I have both a 980X Gulftown and a 2500K Sandy Bridge in my [email protected] farm. They run 100% 24x7. I have studied numerous reviews and been briefed by Intel. Here's how I would build a decision tree for you:

Raw CPU Power: A 2500K is about the same as an i7-930 in folding. That's better than any Core 2, but about 75% of an i7-870 (socket 1156). Threads matter, and 2500K does not have them.

Overclocker Sandy Bridge chips overclock on air up to about 5 GHz. Say, 4+ GHz at near stock voltages (you do want your chip to still work in a year, I presume). Takes about 2 minutes to bump the multipliers, and you're off to the races. Tradeoff: you have to buy a P67 motherboard and a K-suffix chip; you lose the neat video transcoding QuickSync capabilities available in a no-overclock-allowed H67 motherboard with integrated graphics. Or wait until February when the Z67 motherboards come out that support integrated graphics and K-sufffix overclocking. Confused? Yes, Intel did fog that up.

Video Processing Sandy Bridge, for sure, for video transcoding recorded TV down to iPhone, for example. Transcoding is hardware-assisted on Sandy Bridge. But socket 1366 for serious video editing/processing applications that need more memory, memory bandwidth, and hyperthreading.

General Multitasking Sandy Bridge is like a turbo four-cylinder to the V8 of Core i7 and the V12 of a 980X Gulftown.

Hope that helps,
- Catalina588


Quote:


Originally Posted by mtbiker033
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for a new build right now you should go SB.

the only reason to go 1366 is if you get a tremendous deal on the cpu & board.

Thanks...

It was Catalina588's points that I've quoted that made me question what I'd pretty-much decided on as a path.

If I go SB... it will be 2600K with 2 x 4Gb 2000Mhz ram for a start, maybe even 4 x 4Gb, and again... the machine will be a purpose-built video encoding PC in a situation where a 970/980 cpu cannot be afforded.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by X-Legend
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Note: I'll mostly use it for high-end gaming and some simple video/photo editing. I have a Radeon 6870 that I plan on SLi'ng sometime in the near future, if that makes any difference.

The only reason I'd get the 950 is because of the 1366 socket. Eventually, those 980xs are going to go down in price. And when they do, I'm going to get one (if I go the 1366 route) I'm just wondering if those 980x have a huge significant advantage over the 2600ks. And whether or not it's worth sticking to the older 1366 technology

SB will do you fine for the reasons you will be using your rig. There is no gaming performance increase with the 6-core (so in other words, save your money
)

Quote:


Originally Posted by Catalina588
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One-Monitor Gamer If you're a gamer with a single video card and one monitor up to 1080p, then Sandy Bridge P67 will suit you fine. If you need more than two graphics cards, you're probably going to hit a PCIe barrier; look to socket 1366 for more PCIe options.

...NO! The difference is sooooo minimal you will not notice the difference. Just take some time and read this...AMD Radeon HD 5870 PCI-Express Scaling or GeForce GTX 480 PCI-Express Scaling. There are also other articles related to this regarding SLI/Xfire configurations...just Google it


Quote:


Originally Posted by fritzman
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If I go SB... it will be 2600K with 2 x 4Gb 2000Mhz ram for a start, maybe even 4 x 4Gb, and again... the machine will be a purpose-built video encoding PC in a situation where a 970/980 cpu cannot be afforded.

Honestly, all you need is a 2500K if your build is strictly for gaming & video-encoding. HT is not going to do anything special for you and for video-encoding, the performance difference will be minimal when compared to the 2500K. Check out the reviews for these processors & you will see for yourself.

Regarding to memory speed, you should save your ca$h & stick with 1600MHz Cas 7/8 ram. The memory speed will have no effect with video-encoding or gaming at the end of the day. Take some time & read this...Bit-tech's Article: The Best Memory for Sandy Bridge

Read, research, & don't be afraid to ask for proof...The long travel becomes more enjoyable when you see & learn more
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by drBlahMan
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Honestly, all you need is a 2500K if your build is strictly for gaming & video-encoding. HT is not going to do anything special for you and for video-encoding, the performance difference will be minimal when compared to the 2500K. Check out the reviews for these processors & you will see for yourself.

Regarding to memory speed, you should save your ca$h & stick with 1600MHz Cas 7/8 ram. The memory speed will have no effect with video-encoding or gaming at the end of the day. Take some time & read this...Bit-tech's Article: The Best Memory for Sandy Bridge

Read, research, & don't be afraid to ask for proof...The long travel becomes more enjoyable when you see & learn more


Thanks drB

I guess I'm liking the sound of a nice cool overclock to 4.4-4.6ish on air (hence thinking the 2600K is the way to go), figuring that it will have to increase overall performace despite being almost at stock settings., and with pricing of Ram the way it is... a kit of 2 x 4Gb 2000Mhz ram is fine, with the opportunity to go to 16Gb later if it's going to make a real difference.

edit... having now read that article you linked (awesome article btw)... I'm thinking of lower Mhz & tighter timings is the way to go.

Thanks again
 

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When I was shopping for a motherboard/processor 6 months ago and doing my research, I was under the impression that the 1366 chipset was superior, not only because you could only get an i7 on the 1366 at the time, but that there was a really bad bottleneck with the PCI-E lanes. I went with a 930 as a result. Were you planning on doing crossfire/sli? Has anyone here mentioned the chipsets themselves and their pros/cons instead of just comparing the two CPU's? While SB may be superior in some aspects compared to a 950 your motherboard may hold you back as well.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by X-Legend
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The only reason I'd get the 950 is because of the 1366 socket. Eventually, those 980xs are going to go down in price. And when they do, I'm going to get one (if I go the 1366 route) I'm just wondering if those 980x have a huge significant advantage over the 2600ks. And whether or not it's worth sticking to the older 1366 technology.

I would say go with the SB. Also I wouldn't plan on those EE CPU's to come down in price THAT much unless you buy used. Just look at the older Core2 EE, they are still selling for significantly more than even the newest non EE i7 chip. GL with your build
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by rbarrett96
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When I was shopping for a motherboard/processor 6 months ago and doing my research, I was under the impression that the 1366 chipset was superior, not only because you could only get an i7 on the 1366 at the time, but that there was a really bad bottleneck with the PCI-E lanes. I went with a 930 as a result. Were you planning on doing crossfire/sli? Has anyone here mentioned the chipsets themselves and their pros/cons instead of just comparing the two CPU's? While SB may be superior in some aspects compared to a 950 your motherboard may hold you back as well.

Definitely only a single card.

Haven't seen any discussion about boards bottlenecking, but I'm sure someone will have considered it somewhere.
 
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