Overclock.net banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Been around...
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to figure out a way to insert a DS18B20 dallas temperature probe in my loop. The probe is a 6mm diameter stainless steel tube that's about 50mm long, but I probably only need to insert the first 30mm of it. Here's a picture of what one of these probes looks like: https://www.adafruit.com/product/381

My first thought was to take one of the plastic G1/4 plugs I have laying around and drill a hole into it, shove the probe through that, and somehow seal it.

As an alternative, I could put it through any G1/4 fitting and try to figure out how to seal that.

(Whatever I do, I need it to be watertight and compatible with a copper radiator.)

Does anyone have any suggestions? What would a good sealant be?

Thanks
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,401 Posts
Not sure why you need this precise temp readings compared to a Calitemp sensor. If stuck on using this temp sensor I'd suggest inserting it from the top of the reservoir.
 

·
Been around...
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Not sure why you need this precise temp readings compared to a Calitemp sensor. If stuck on using this temp sensor I'd suggest inserting it from the top of the reservoir.
I'm not using aquacomputers aquaero, and I have no idea what kind of temperature sensor is inside that calitemp. (Do you know? 4 wires... I2C bus based?)

While I can insert it from the top my res, I'd want to seal it so it doesn't leak water all over the place when I top my computer on it's side.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,401 Posts
Well if you don't care for looks then really any plumbers silicone sealant would do the trick.

As for the Calitemp I have no idea what it used, though I still believe it measures the temp of the fitting and not the actual water temp and yeah it would require an Aquaero.
 

·
Tech Enthusiast
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
I'm trying to figure out a way to insert a DS18B20 dallas temperature probe in my loop. The probe is a 6mm diameter stainless steel tube that's about 50mm long, but I probably only need to insert the first 30mm of it. Here's a picture of what one of these probes looks like: https://www.adafruit.com/product/381

My first thought was to take one of the plastic G1/4 plugs I have laying around and drill a hole into it, shove the probe through that, and somehow seal it.

As an alternative, I could put it through any G1/4 fitting and try to figure out how to seal that.

(Whatever I do, I need it to be watertight and compatible with a copper radiator.)

Does anyone have any suggestions? What would a good sealant be?

Thanks
Gary
I'm sorry, I hate when people respond to my questions with reasons on why I shouldn't do what I ask, instead of just answering the question asked. It really bothers me, and yet I am about to do it here. The reason is I am not sure what a good sealant would be, and I don't have a good suggestion on where to insert it, except for that I would probably put it on the Res Cap, and find a way to seal that properly, I am sure with enough pressure and a proper o-ring fit it can be done, I just am not an expert in that area.

But, I would suggest, possibly an easier route to go, would be to purchase something like a calitemp, or a 2 pin Temp Sensor made by Aquacomputer or Alphacool, there are plenty on the market. And I am assuming you want to use the DS18B20 because you trust it is calibrated properly. What I would do is put both Temp sensors in a bowl of water , and then calibrate the other one to the same temperature as the DS18B20. Then heat the water, dip them back in and make sure they both read the same still, and if they do just use the one already made for it.

That, or if you find the calitemp is not as accurate as the DS18B20, then cut out the sensor in the calitemp, and wire your sensor to it. As long as you document which cable you splice to which, you can cut off the connector at the end of the Calitemp and wire that to whatever you were going to wire your DS18B20 sensor to to begin with. It would be a fun little project.

Sorry I wish I had a better direct answer to your actual question.

EDIT: I do know the Calitemp uses 3 wires, as it appears the DS18B20 uses.
 

·
Space Cadet
Joined
·
455 Posts
You could use a vent and just remove the vent part and then use something like a 5 way.
 

Attachments

·
Been around...
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
But, I would suggest, possibly an easier route to go, would be to purchase something like a calitemp, or a 2 pin Temp Sensor made by Aquacomputer or Alphacool, there are plenty on the market. And I am assuming you want to use the DS18B20 because you trust it is calibrated properly. What I would do is put both Temp sensors in a bowl of water , and then calibrate the other one to the same temperature as the DS18B20. Then heat the water, dip them back in and make sure they both read the same still, and if they do just use the one already made for it.

That, or if you find the calitemp is not as accurate as the DS18B20, then cut out the sensor in the calitemp, and wire your sensor to it. As long as you document which cable you splice to which, you can cut off the connector at the end of the Calitemp and wire that to whatever you were going to wire your DS18B20 sensor to to begin with. It would be a fun little project.
It's not that I don't trust the calitemp, or that it's the wrong color, or anything like that. It's that I don't have and don't want an aquaero, and I have no idea what kind of sensor is inside the calitemp.

I believe the calitemp uses 4 wires (not 3.) At least that's what it looks like from the picture here: (https://shop.aquacomputer.de/product_info.php?language=en&products_id=3774) It claims to be a digital sensor. However, there's not much more info to go on to try and figure out what's inside of it. It has claims of accuracy, but there's no way for me to know how accurate those claims are in order to compare them to tech specs of various temp sensors. It might even be a basic thermistor with an A/D converter in the body. It might be something based on the I2C bus. I don't know (and I'm not going to spend the money just to rip one apart to figure it out.) I somehow doubt that AquaComputer would be willing to tell me what's inside. For all I know, they might have even modified the original sensor in some way just to make it proprietary. (I doubt they would do that, as it'd drive up the cost.)

As for the mass market two pin sensors, they are all thermistors. Usually 10K NTC with a beta of 3950. Usually. Sometimes. I have a couple in front of me that I've been playing with and one of them isn't exactly what it claims to be. (Same code running both of them results in a temp difference of 2C.) Sadly, I don't have a lab, so I can't precisely measure what resistances they are giving at precise temperatures. As well, the A/D conversion on my chosen project board (ESP32 based) jitters badly even after I calibrate out the oddities this board has with reading voltages.

All of which leads me back to the DS18B20. It's one of the few sensors I can get that comes in a water proof package, provides a digital signal, is extremely easy to read, and is pre-calibrated. I just need to find a watertight way to stick it into my loop. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I'd use silicone or Wet-Bond epoxy. Clean both surfaces with a solvent and have at it.
 

·
Tech Enthusiast
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
It's not that I don't trust the calitemp, or that it's the wrong color, or anything like that. It's that I don't have and don't want an aquaero, and I have no idea what kind of sensor is inside the calitemp.

I believe the calitemp uses 4 wires (not 3.) At least that's what it looks like from the picture here: (https://shop.aquacomputer.de/product_info.php?language=en&products_id=3774) It claims to be a digital sensor. However, there's not much more info to go on to try and figure out what's inside of it. It has claims of accuracy, but there's no way for me to know how accurate those claims are in order to compare them to tech specs of various temp sensors. It might even be a basic thermistor with an A/D converter in the body. It might be something based on the I2C bus. I don't know (and I'm not going to spend the money just to rip one apart to figure it out.) I somehow doubt that AquaComputer would be willing to tell me what's inside. For all I know, they might have even modified the original sensor in some way just to make it proprietary. (I doubt they would do that, as it'd drive up the cost.)

As for the mass market two pin sensors, they are all thermistors. Usually 10K NTC with a beta of 3950. Usually. Sometimes. I have a couple in front of me that I've been playing with and one of them isn't exactly what it claims to be. (Same code running both of them results in a temp difference of 2C.) Sadly, I don't have a lab, so I can't precisely measure what resistances they are giving at precise temperatures. As well, the A/D conversion on my chosen project board (ESP32 based) jitters badly even after I calibrate out the oddities this board has with reading voltages.

All of which leads me back to the DS18B20. It's one of the few sensors I can get that comes in a water proof package, provides a digital signal, is extremely easy to read, and is pre-calibrated. I just need to find a watertight way to stick it into my loop. :)
Your right, I just pulled one out, it is 4 wires, for some reason I thought it was 3, but it uses the 4pin AquaBus setup. I am not sure what sensor they use, so not sure.

I liked the idea @polar put forward, those Alphacool 5 way fittings are long enough to fit the entire sensor in the end, then all you have to do is fit the wires through a vented cap and then seal it up, and then run the liquid straight through one of the top fittings, and then out the adjacent bottom for direct flow over your sensor. Should be pretty simple and not look bad at all.

What are you hooking your DS18B20 up to anyways? A digital Thermometer?
 

·
Been around...
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
those Alphacool 5 way fittings are long enough to fit the entire sensor in the end, then all you have to do is fit the wires through a vented cap and then seal it up, and then run the liquid straight through one of the top fittings, and then out the adjacent bottom for direct flow over your sensor. Should be pretty simple and not look bad at all.
The vents I've seen wouldn't work: The hole doesn't go all the way through, and if I pop the entire vent part out, I might as well just start with a G1/4 male/female extender. A simple G1/4 plug with a hole drilled in it might be better...

I think I might be able to fit it in a currently plugged inlet near the bottom of my reservoir. If not, I can always put it in from the top. Either way, what I'm currently thinking is that I'll get one of the plastic G1/4 plugs I have laying around and drill a 1/4" hole in it. That should be very close to 6mm. Then seal the sensor in with one of the epoxy products suggested in this thread. (I don't trust silicone as an adhesive.)

Instead of a plug, I could also use a G1/4 male/male adapter or a male/female extender, but then there would be a much bigger hole I'd have to fill and seal.

What are you hooking your DS18B20 up to anyways? A digital Thermometer?
There's a story there... (TL;DR version is the last line of the message)

My last motherboard didn't support addressable LEDs, so I grabbed a teensy board (an overpowered arduino type project board) and programmed it to drive my LED's using whatever pattern I want. I also wired a few buttons to my case to allow easy changes. I had always wanted to get one of the little TFT or OLED screens and wire that up, and then write a service to pull temp sensor data from hwinfo and forward to the teensy board - and then display that data on the little screen. (I have a PERFECT place in my case for the screen..) I never got around to doing all that, however.

When I got my current m/b, I found that asus now supports addressable LED's. I also found out that Asus still hasn't learned to develop software, so their "aura" software sucks. Armoury Crate is even worse. So, I went back to the teensy...

Today, I'm doing the LED's with an ESP32 based board instead, and now I have the little TFT display as well. However, I decided that I don't want to depend on hwinfo64 running, or even my machine being booted into an OS for the display to contain information. As well, I'd like the LED's to change patterns, colors or whatever based on sensor data. (For example, if the water temp gets to 35C, the lighting should transition to red. If the delta between ambient air and water is greater or equal to 10C, it should start flashing and going nuts to get my attention.

I started doing all that with a 10K NTC thermistor, but those things suck, aren't calibrated, and the ESP32 has a horrible ADC. This is what the DS18B20 is for. (3 DS18B20's, actually. Ambient air, water, and case air.)

TL;DR version: I'm recreating some of the functionality of an aquaero, but I'm doing it my way, with my cosmetics, and whatever functionality I want.
 

·
Tech Enthusiast
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
The vents I've seen wouldn't work: The hole doesn't go all the way through, and if I pop the entire vent part out, I might as well just start with a G1/4 male/female extender. A simple G1/4 plug with a hole drilled in it might be better...

I think I might be able to fit it in a currently plugged inlet near the bottom of my reservoir. If not, I can always put it in from the top. Either way, what I'm currently thinking is that I'll get one of the plastic G1/4 plugs I have laying around and drill a 1/4" hole in it. That should be very close to 6mm. Then seal the sensor in with one of the epoxy products suggested in this thread. (I don't trust silicone as an adhesive.)

Instead of a plug, I could also use a G1/4 male/male adapter or a male/female extender, but then there would be a much bigger hole I'd have to fill and seal.


There's a story there... (TL;DR version is the last line of the message)

My last motherboard didn't support addressable LEDs, so I grabbed a teensy board (an overpowered arduino type project board) and programmed it to drive my LED's using whatever pattern I want. I also wired a few buttons to my case to allow easy changes. I had always wanted to get one of the little TFT or OLED screens and wire that up, and then write a service to pull temp sensor data from hwinfo and forward to the teensy board - and then display that data on the little screen. (I have a PERFECT place in my case for the screen..) I never got around to doing all that, however.

When I got my current m/b, I found that asus now supports addressable LED's. I also found out that Asus still hasn't learned to develop software, so their "aura" software sucks. Armoury Crate is even worse. So, I went back to the teensy...

Today, I'm doing the LED's with an ESP32 based board instead, and now I have the little TFT display as well. However, I decided that I don't want to depend on hwinfo64 running, or even my machine being booted into an OS for the display to contain information. As well, I'd like the LED's to change patterns, colors or whatever based on sensor data. (For example, if the water temp gets to 35C, the lighting should transition to red. If the delta between ambient air and water is greater or equal to 10C, it should start flashing and going nuts to get my attention.

I started doing all that with a 10K NTC thermistor, but those things suck, aren't calibrated, and the ESP32 has a horrible ADC. This is what the DS18B20 is for. (3 DS18B20's, actually. Ambient air, water, and case air.)

TL;DR version: I'm recreating some of the functionality of an aquaero, but I'm doing it my way, with my cosmetics, and whatever functionality I want.
That is fricking sweet! I can't wait to see the end product. These are all the reasons I swear by the Aquaero, because they are all things you can do, and I haven't noticed the Calitemp sensors doing anything flaky, although I have noticed the 2 pin ones never match, which is why I switched to the Calitemp sensors, those always seem to be calibrated within a .5 degree c of each other. But this is definitely very sweet. I became very close to picking up an Arduino for aRGB control, until I found Aquasuite and RGBpx. I have Asus boards with argb and I refuse to use it, RGBpx just works, and you can save the profile, no matter how complex the lighting effect, to the device itself, so you don't have to rely on the software being open. Sounds like your design is going to be just as, or even more, badass. Can't wait to see it!
 

·
Been around...
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
That is fricking sweet! I can't wait to see the end product. These are all the reasons I swear by the Aquaero, because they are all things you can do, and I haven't noticed the Calitemp sensors doing anything flaky, although I have noticed the 2 pin ones never match, which is why I switched to the Calitemp sensors, those always seem to be calibrated within a .5 degree c of each other. But this is definitely very sweet. I became very close to picking up an Arduino for aRGB control, until I found Aquasuite and RGBpx. I have Asus boards with argb and I refuse to use it, RGBpx just works, and you can save the profile, no matter how complex the lighting effect, to the device itself, so you don't have to rely on the software being open. Sounds like your design is going to be just as, or even more, badass. Can't wait to see it!
Can Aquaerodo make your reservoir look like this? (That was a fun project. teensy board, and special 5mm wide AP102 LED's stuffed into the the plastic holder of a MMRS light tube (with the cold cathode removed, of course.)) This was part of my original plan, but that part of it bombed when I found that the MMRS plastic tube was leaking water on to the LED's.

That was to be the effect when my water was getting warm. Obvious enough?

 

·
Tech Enthusiast
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
Can Aquaerodo make your reservoir look like this? (That was a fun project. teensy board, and special 5mm wide AP102 LED's stuffed into the the plastic holder of a MMRS light tube (with the cold cathode removed, of course.)) This was part of my original plan, but that part of it bombed when I found that the MMRS plastic tube was leaking water on to the LED's.

That was to be the effect when my water was getting warm. Obvious enough?

https://youtu.be/JSGbs_4b0QM
That is sweet! The Aquaero alone, probably not, as it only has capability for 12v RGB (Non Addressable). But with a Farbwerk Nano, or other RGBpx capable device it is absolutely possible, basically you run the same lights you ran, and wire them to the controller. (I make my own wires, so I can use any 5v Addressable product I like, even though the connectors from different companies are all different, all 5v rgb products have a 5v, data, and ground, so you just use a multimeter to figure out which is which, then simply make your own adapter/cable. I run Corsair, Phanteks, NZXT, and Cooler Master Products with my RGBpx controller, and it works perfectly.

However that said, I love your implementation, makes me want to jump into another arduino project, just so much to learn, but I know thats most of the fun!
 

·
woot
Joined
·
2,599 Posts

·
Been around...
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
at 4mm it is really close to the size of a 5mm led. you could buy an acrylic plug designed to hold a 5mm led and drill it the rest of the way through for the temp probe. dab of clear silicone sealant and you in bidness.

https://www.performance-pcs.com/water-cooling/fittings-connectors/modmytoys-acrylic-led-g1-4-plug-bare-mmt-g14plug.html#qa
My target hole size is 6mm, but this is still a good idea. Having a "starter" hole that I'd only need to enlarge would be much less error prone than trying to drill from a smooth surface.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top