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Discussion Starter #1
Someone here on overclock.net had a brilliant idea of cutting away the side panel/side wall of his exhaust fan because it was over his VRM heatsinks. The result was his VRM's ran cooler. Would this idea work for RAM? For dual tower heatsinks it seems like the front fan is always over the RAM, so would cutting out the side panel/side wall of the fan allow for some of that airflow to be directed at the memory heatspreaders?
 

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Overclock the World
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Idea wouldn't work
Unlike on VRM fans which are drop-down top oriented
Changing a fan's housing only destroys it's build pressure and pretty much destroys the fan
Like a Tornado, or no better - like a water tornado inside a glass
if you cut a hole, it would lose it's vortex effect and leak
It won't even be able to build up pressure and likely deform the blades by time

Every fan even the Dyson blade-less designs, use a housing system to redirect, build up and force pressure somewhere.
Water is a great example of this, on a garden hose
If you make a tiny dot, it will lose pressure, and if you cut it on several sides by a thin long strip - like you do on a fish
The stripes you do, likely will have higher pressure than what comes out at the end of the hose

With a tiny exception, that air's mass is far smaller than waters
Soo you will lose far more pressure than if you compare it with a water vortex
Overall the vortex effect for building up pressure remains identical, and destroying the shape of the housing, destroys any attempt of the blades to generate pressure @8051
Soo the end result would be identical to you trying with your pointing finger to make circles in the air and expect to generate and move any kind of pressure :p
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I see Veii's point, it would compromise the fan's pressure, which doesn't matter much for an exhaust fan.

What this fellow overclocker.net member did was cut the side out of his exhaust fan so there was a port that directed airflow to his VRM's, there were no fans blowing directly on his VRM's.
 

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Meep
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I see Veii's point, it would compromise the fan's pressure, which doesn't matter much for an exhaust fan.

What this fellow overclocker.net member did was cut the side out of his exhaust fan so there was a port that directed airflow to his VRM's, there were no fans blowing directly on his VRM's.
It all depends on the actual geometry of the fan, some work quite well without(or with a compromised) frame, others not well at all.

But I'd imagine the ones that work well also wouldn't send much air out the side, ignoring the benefits you were going for in the first place.

Honestly, the better way of increasing airflow to a specific component is by just adding a small fan, far more effective overall.
 

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Much easier options for cooling ram rather then cutting holes in cases.


Just ziptie a fan over you ram or if you dont mind spending money buy the INWIN MARS fan
 

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Overclock the World
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I see Veii's point, it would compromise the fan's pressure, which doesn't matter much for an exhaust fan.

What this fellow overclocker.net member did was cut the side out of his exhaust fan so there was a port that directed airflow to his VRM's, there were no fans blowing directly on his VRM's.
A fan without pressure, doesn't move air, it won't be able to soak air ~ at best with a distance of 10cm max
What you could at best do, is make a tiny cutout at the end of the housing , which will let you change the vortex pattern to side instead of centered
This should be enough to "leak air" around the case instead of centering it

Actually, can we see this fan's blades ?
Illustrative examples:
High Flow Series:
Center Focused intake
Uses Housing for spreading air around it
Higher distance , increases air spread

High Pressure Series:
By design also center soaking-focused intake
Has wider but non curved blades
Doesn't center air to the outside housing but uses the vortex effect to create pressure to the with the vacuum effect
Curved housing redirects air back to the center
(The closer this design is to a restrictive case, the higher the build up pressure becomes)

Example of the effect with a housing and without

HF series, air "flow-tunnel" extends by distance
HP series, air "flow-tunnel" shrinks by distance before it extends again
Both use the same redirecting air effect

Soo cutting the housing up to fan blades, might work ~ if the design is to spread the air around the housing
But it might also fully kill any kind of pressure it creates ~ or on higher RPM even deform the blades after time :)
 

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Someone here on overclock.net had a brilliant idea of cutting away the side panel/side wall of his exhaust fan because it was over his VRM heatsinks. The result was his VRM's ran cooler. Would this idea work for RAM? For dual tower heatsinks it seems like the front fan is always over the RAM, so would cutting out the side panel/side wall of the fan allow for some of that airflow to be directed at the memory heatspreaders?
Lots of good discussion. Obviously it depends on fan design. If I was having RAM temp problems I would consider drilling some holes in fan shroud on RAM side and experiment. Might move enough air to make a difference.

I wonder if a small shroud / duct on lower part of fan reaching up on exhaust side 10-15mm to catch air off of fan above RAM turning that air so it flows into RAM. Maybe something like below, assuming it will clear cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lots of good discussion. Obviously it depends on fan design. If I was having RAM temp problems I would consider drilling some holes in fan shroud on RAM side and experiment. Might move enough air to make a difference.

I wonder if a small shroud / duct on lower part of fan reaching up on exhaust side 10-15mm to catch air off of fan above RAM turning that air so it flows into RAM. Maybe something like below, assuming it will clear cooler.
I wish I could find the original post where the OC.net member discussed how he cut out the side panel of his fan and the differences it made to his RAM temps. It makes sense because the air is flowing off the tips of the fan blades as its accelerated.

A 360° change in air velocity direction would probably affect the speed of the airflow substantially.
 

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I just sold my Corsair Airflow but you can get them on ebay for $30. They work with any ram.
 

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I just sold my Corsair Airflow but you can get them on ebay for $30. They work with any ram.
can't imagine they push that much airflow, fan is 60mm?
 

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I just sold my Corsair Airflow but you can get them on ebay for $30. They work with any ram.
can't imagine they push that much airflow, fan is 60mm?
IDK never used it 😂

I sold the ram kit to jaguarbamf and he didn’t even want the fan. I’m sure he’ll give it to OP for the cost of shipping.

Those blades are finger cutters so I’m sure it’s just fine. RAM just needs a little bit of air between the dimms.
 

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I wish I could find the original post where the OC.net member discussed how he cut out the side panel of his fan and the differences it made to his RAM temps. It makes sense because the air is flowing off the tips of the fan blades as its accelerated.

A 360° change in air velocity direction would probably affect the speed of the airflow substantially.
I don't think the direction change would be a problem. RAM doesn't need much airflow to stay cool. Idea was to be able to re-direct fan airflow without modifying fan .. and distribute airflow over all of RAM.

I'm afraid slots cut in fan shroud would likely only move air out in a line parallel with fan, which is parallel with RAM. So not spread out over top of all RAM.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I just sold my Corsair Airflow but you can get them on ebay for $30. They work with any ram.
I couldn't use that without pushing the front fan on my NHD15s even further up then it already is.
 

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Meep
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While fans modifications and ducts would probably work, I'm not sure how much sense it makes to redirect or restrict flow from your main cooler just to fix a small deadzone.

A small fan to move the air in between the ram is all you need to fix your issue, if there is one. It doesn't even need to spin fast and are dead easy to stick anywhere.
 

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I couldn't use that without pushing the front fan on my NHD15s even further up then it already is.
True that. I think if fan is setting just above RAM anything done to fan would only dump air into area in line with fan, so wouldn't cool RAM in other sockets (if other sockets are used).

While fans modifications and ducts would probably work, I'm not sure how much sense it makes to redirect or restrict flow from your main cooler just to fix a small deadzone.

A small fan to move the air in between the ram is all you need to fix your issue, if there is one. It doesn't even need to spin fast and are dead easy to stick anywhere.
Not sure it would be using enough airflow to change CPU temps.

Indeed, most of the time case & CPU cooler fans moves enough air over RAM to keep it cool. RAM doesn't take much airflow to stay cool. At least it didn't when RAM isn't covered wiht foo-foo making it 1.5-2 times taller than actual RAM PCB and doubling RAM thickness / decreasing space between stick to almost nothing. I say 'covers' because they are not really much if any good as heatsinks. Often RAM runs cooler with them removed.
 
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