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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most places will list brand, model, platter size, and storage space. Some will list a model number, height (for 2.5" drives), and rotation speed. But almost none will list the number of platters and platter density or power consumption. Is there any resource that lists those? I'm asking about power consumption mainly for laptops and would definitely like to know about the platters in general (though 5mm and 7mm drives are always and usually single platter, respectively, and I think you can cram three in a 9.5mm drive). So, any database at all? If not, would anybody want to make one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Other than power (which is difficult to find for not-processor components anyway), that is exactly what I needed. Interesting, not only is one of Seagate 2 TB drives either two or three platters depending on which model (with the EXACT SAME MODEL NUMBER) you get, so are the 2 TB WD Greens and Reds (again, the only difference is weight, nothing else to identify it). I'll be sure to stay away from those and go straight for 3 TB. Also confirms for me that my laptop HDD is in fact two 500 GB platters, which is less mass to move, which should put less strain on the motor and therefore battery.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CynicalUnicorn View Post

Other than power (which is difficult to find for not-processor components anyway), that is exactly what I needed. Interesting, not only is one of Seagate 2 TB drives either two or three platters depending on which model (with the EXACT SAME MODEL NUMBER) you get, so are the 2 TB WD Greens and Reds (again, the only difference is weight, nothing else to identify it). I'll be sure to stay away from those and go straight for 3 TB. Also confirms for me that my laptop HDD is in fact two 500 GB platters, which is less mass to move, which should put less strain on the motor and therefore battery.
Yeah, I believe Seagate did that with some of their current 7200.14 drives as well. Not all of them use 1TB platters... even within the same size.
mad.gif
 
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