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Sorry but I don't understand what equipment are you using ?<br>
And why are you bothered with ripple ? Did you measure it ?<br><br><br>
however<br>
what I have seen on commercial product are 2000uF 16V electrolytic caps only on PCI-e +12V lines<br>
but if you feel it<br>
you can use polymer, higher capacity, lower capacity and multiple caps, also on +5 and +3.3 lines<br><br>
caps for ripple suppression must be connected in parallel<br>
+ with +<br>
- with -
 

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1-what's your unit ?<br>
2- I think that you can not blame the psu for the poor OC but, perhaps, it's a limit of your hardware<br>
3-polymer are usually better BUT everything depends on the quality of the cap's model
 

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My 2c:<br><div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25798086" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>superrobowizard</strong> <a href="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25798086"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
-What size capacitors should I use?<br>
-What voltage should they be rated?<br>
-Should I use polymer or electrolytic?</div>
</div>
<br><b>ATX connector</b><br>
+12V: Low ESR poly of 220~560uF, or low ESR lytic of 220~560uF. 16V rating minimum.<br>
+5V: Low ESR poly of 220~560uF, or low ESR lytic of 220~560uF. 10V rating minimum <i>(some makers use 6.3V polys here).</i><br>
+3.3V: Low ESR poly of 220~560uF, or low ESR lytic of 220~560uF. 5V rating minimum.<br><br><b>EPS12V or ATX12V or "P4" connector:</b> Low ESR poly of 220~560uF, 16V. Or low ESR lytic of from 220uF to anything within reason, say 3300uF <i>(the larger the lytic cap, the lower the ESR. The lower the ESR, the better for this application).</i><br><br><b>PCIe connector feeding a power-hungry GPU</b>: I'd solder one low ESR lytic of 2200~3300uF 16V. Or even two of them in parallel <i>(for even lower ESR, and larger capacitance to deal with today's GPUs wildly varying power peaks).</i><br><br><div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25798086" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>superrobowizard</strong> <a href="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25798086"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
-How should they be installed? bridging the negative and positive?</div>
</div>
<br>
For +12V rail, cap's positive on yellow +12V wire, cap's negative on black ground wire. For +5V rail, cap's positive on red +5V wire, cap's negative on black ground. & so on.<br><br>
The closer to the connector you're able to solder the caps, the better (lower ESR).<br><br><br><br>
Some examples of DIY cable caps by here your servant:<br><br><div class="bbcode_center" style="text-align:center;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948831/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2948831" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948831/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 475px"></a><br><br><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948832/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2948832" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948832/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 433px"></a><br><br><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948833/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2948833" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948833/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 245px"></a><br><br><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948834/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2948834" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2948834/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 323px"></a></div>
<br><div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25798086" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>superrobowizard</strong> <a href="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25798086"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Yes I know I'm crazy, you don't need to tell me that.</div>
</div>
<br>
You aren't and I will not.
 

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1-the review is of the 500W unit, your 400W can be different<br>
2-carefully read the review, Jonny says:
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">an array of mostly polymer capacitors. Take note, you folks who think polymers are the answer to all ripple problems... we still got 90mV on 12V2 with these. It ain't all about the caps, people</div>
</div>
so, I still think that adding caps won't solve your problem<br>
3-in this "so tight system" 50W can be a huge difference also RX480 is not a low-level card...<br>
4-rated = supported, if the cap is rated above 16V it will be only safer
 

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<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25799926" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>superrobowizard</strong> <a href="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25799926"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
... Would it be bad to get a capacitor rated at above 16V? Would it fry my hardware, or just be a bit overkill?</div>
</div>
<br>
You need to read this: <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/What-does-the-voltage-rating-on-a-capacitor-mean" target="_blank">http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/What-does-the-voltage-rating-on-a-capacitor-mean</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25800364" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>superrobowizard</strong> <a href="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25800364"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
... Would these work? ... <a class="bbcode_url" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=overclockdotnet-20&location=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Faw%2Fd%2FB0052GK868%2F" target="_blank">https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0052GK868/</a></div>
</div>
<br>
Nope, those are <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.nichicon.co.jp/english/products/pdfs/e-vz.pdf" target="_blank"><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Nichicon VZ</span></b></a>, that series is not low ESR.<br><br>
For this application you want low ESR (low impedance) caps, like for instance <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://tutorials.lcdalternatives.com/faq/FM.pdf" target="_blank"><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Panasonic FM</span></b></a>.<br><br><br>
So the PSU in question is the 400W version of <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=276" target="_blank"><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">this one</span></b></a>?
 

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<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25801636" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>superrobowizard</strong> <a href="/t/1621610/adding-in-cable-caps/0_100#post_25801636"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
... How about one of <a class="bbcode_url" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=overclockdotnet-20&location=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Faw%2Fd%2FB00F9GES6W%2F" target="_blank">these</a> then?</div>
</div>
<br><a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/237828.pdf" target="_blank"><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Chemicon LXV</span></b></a> should cut it. But notice how the 16V 3300uF Panny FM is half the ESR of the 16V 3300uF Chemicon LXV (0.012 vs 0.024 Ω). The lower the ESR, the better.<br><br><br>
Looking at your GA-Z97N-WiFi mobo:<br><div class="bbcode_center" style="text-align:center;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2949407/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2949407" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2949407/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 492px"></a></div>
<br><br>
^ It has only 3x 16V 270uF caps on VRM-high, a measly 810uF total capacitance there. There is a fair chance that soldering one 3300uF low ESR lytic cap right close to the "P4" connector would add some stability to the processor.<br><br>
That mobo is clearly not designed for heavy overclocking, however.
 

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^ Nice find, I thought the legendary <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://site.thecapking.com/Files/e_MCZ" target="_blank"><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Rubycon MCZ</span></b></a> had been discontinued long ago.<br><br>
If you solder two of those in parallel, combined capacitance will be doubled (to 3600uF) and combined ESR will be halved (to just 4.5 mΩ <img alt="thumb.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/thumb.gif"> ).
 

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exactly because the pins are short and even (and also bend)<br>
electrolytic caps come with long and uneven pin (negative the longer)(if I remember correctly)<br>
also<br>
they should be out of production<br><br>
TELVM seems an expert, I would wait for his opinion
 
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