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Why would you delid a soldered CPU?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

Why would you delid a soldered CPU?
For better cooling, Sure solder is better then budget TIM but you still get un-even solder contact and removing more materiel between die and cooler improves temps.
If I had the guts or the money to delid my chip I would since there is 20C differences between best and worst core under load. But im not up to risk destroying a $800 chip.

Is there ment to be a guide since page is blank other then you saying "Threw together a guide where I delidded a few soldered CPUs (X5690s in this case) for a Mac Pro upgrade."
--- Working now ---
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmitriy View Post

Please elaborate.
2009 4.1 Mac Pro came with delidded CPU from the factory, when people swapped to much better Xeons they either ended up ruining their duaghtboards and cpus or they had to do shoddy work around like using 2.2mm of spacers on the heatsink standoffs to make up for the added height of the IHS, you would also have to clip the fan connector on the heatsink to ensure a good connection or your fans would run at 100% which is like 4200 rpm on a Mac Pro and would also ruin your fans. So... the other solution is to replace delidded CPUs with delidded CPUs and you don't have to mess with any of the work around shenanigans.
 

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Good stuff. I was actually kind of surprised by how much and how hard the junk was between the heatsink and the die! I used the iron method not so long ago on a spare i7-920 I hand. Not too much of a job if done properly. Only difference -the heat coming out of the bad boy of an iron I used. I suppose it was enough to melt this junk. A wipe with a clean rag did the job. But in worst case scenario I'll play with the razorblade
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Discussion Starter #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euskafreez View Post

Good stuff. I was actually kind of surprised by how much and how hard the junk was between the heatsink and the die! I used the iron method not so long ago on a spare i7-920 I hand. Not too much of a job if done properly. Only difference -the heat coming out of the bad boy of an iron I used. I suppose it was enough to melt this junk. A wipe with a clean rag did the job. But in worst case scenario I'll play with the razorblade
biggrin.gif
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I think the iron method is a great idea, I couldn't get it to work for me though and had to go with the torch method. My iron wouldn't get hot enough, I left it on for a little over a minute and couldn't feel like I was making any headway. The torch took about 30 seconds and the IHS popped right off, with the proper set up I think either method can be viable.

Yeah, don't be afraid to scrape the solder off the die with a razor, just keep a low angle and be slow and careful. Try not to hit and damage the caps on the PCB, when you get through the solder you can feel the difference, they die is hard and smooth just like glass. You will know when you've gotten down to it.
 
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