Overclock.net banner
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,
Totally new to the overclocking community, and decided on recently purchasing an overclocked computer from a major seller. I won't say the name for now, but let's just say I paid a lot of money. Every time I run a LinX test with memory set to All, the cpu temps reach 90-91 degrees Celsius after only about 5-8 minutes of running the test. After about 10 minutes, I stop LinX in fear of putting too much heat on the processor.

My concern is I paid over $2,000 for this system and these were the default case and cooling (listed below) with the default overclocked speed. Is this normal or negligence? I feel that the processor should be running much cooler under any stress test ... and should only reach 90 degrees after running at least 10 cycles... not just after 1 cycle and a few minutes. I am aware Ivy bridge is known to run hotter than the likes of Sandy Bridge and Sandy Bridge-E, but this just doesn't seem right.

My concern is over time with accumulation of dust (I still will clean it every few months) and gradual wear that this computer is going to get even hotter and the processor's life won't be long. As of today, I do a lot of heavy high definition video editing and video games.

The system is:

i7 3770k - overclocked to 4.5ghz
case: Cooler Master 942 HAF X
cpu cooling: 120mm Radiator Liquid CPU Cooler (CORSAIR H80)
motherboard: Asus Sabertooth Z77
idle temps: 30-40 degrees celsius

I cropped the images accordingly to just show the results for each test:
Test #1: http://img641.imageshack.us/img641/6199/snap1sd.png
Test #2: http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/2073/temps4.png

Remember guys... I know nothing about overclocking, hence why I of come here for the best advice I hopefully can get.

Thank you for the help!!!
smile.gif
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,953 Posts
Sadly it seems about normal, well kinda, most 3770K OC's I've seen in that range hit mid 80's, 90+ is to high for me personally, but it's LinX, how hot does it get running prime95 and under normal daily load such as video editing which you said will be your main use? it shouldn't get so hot during normal workload as it does with LinX.

If you are really worried about the temps, I think now is the right time to learn about overclocking and work on lowering that vcore
tongue.gif
Maybe even lower the OC if it bothers you so much, I recently lowered mine to 4.2 to keep voltage below 1.2v and it lowered my temps by around 10c, your results may be better/worse though.

I'd rather be a few hundred mhz lower than pushing my temps to the absolute limit.
redface.gif
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Hello!

Ivy Bridge processors will run a bit hotter than their Sandy Bridge predecessors, so make sure you are making an apples to apples comparison when you are looking at temperature values reported by other users using a H80 cooler.

Here are the first few basic things I would check up on:

1. Fan speed of case fans - If there is no airflow, it will get pretty toasty in there. You also need to keep in mind that most review sites do their reviews with an open air test bench, which means their temps will be slightly lower than yours.

2. Fan speed of your H80 cooler, it could be that they are set to low speeds for noise reduction purposes. If so, try cranking them up and see if you are still experiencing the 90C temps.

3. Did you physically place your computer in a place where it is unable to adequately move air? Desks with built in computer cabinets are awful for airflow and can often deny your computer the airflow it needs.

Assuming you have done the above and still experience high temps I would recommend the following:

1. Check the mounting of the H80 and ensure that it is mounted properly to your CPU. If it wasn't properly mounted (good contact on one side of the CPU and a visible gap on the other side) it could explain the 10C difference between your coolest and hottest cores. If you are uncomfortable with this, have a friend who is more comfortable do it for you or bring it back to the shop you got it from.

2. Ivy bridge processor temps seem to vary from processor to processor. There are some people who get chips that will run 10C cooler despite having the exact same bios settings and cooling system in place. You can have a look at the Ivy Bridge owner's thread and skim the feedback of end users there for more information. Lots of people seem to be running LinX and Prime in the 90C area though, so you might actually be in the "norm"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
When you say the default overclocked speed what do you mean? Did you do the overclock yourself or use some motherboard based overclocking utility? If you used one of these utilities, the voltage being applied to your cpu is probably higher than it needs to be for a stable overclock. Higher voltage = higher temps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,085 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgineng View Post

When you say the default overclocked speed what do you mean? Did you do the overclock yourself or use some motherboard based overclocking utility? If you used one of these utilities, the voltage being applied to your cpu is probably higher than it needs to be for a stable overclock. Higher voltage = higher temps.
You clearly didnt read his post

Your temps seems normal with Ivy Bridge. Like the other member said, its now the time to learn overclocking bcause you have a nice chip and a nice board to learn.

I also heard that the i5 3570k is really easy to overclock. I am building my brother a PC right now with a i5 3570k and i'll be overclocking it. It will be under water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaRLiToS View Post

You clearly didnt read his post
After reading more carefully and noticing that it was overclocked from the seller, there's still probably more voltage than there needs to be. A major retailer would not want to risk any instability in a system, so they would crank the voltage up to a level where there is no chance at being unstable. Unfortunately I can't view the images right now so I have no idea what all is being shown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,780 Posts
It shows a chip that's screaming from pain! Quick look at the Ivy stable / suicide thread doesn't show 1 3770 running those volts.. the one just little under that is running RX240 giving him ~20 degrees better temps (under prime though).

@OP ignore IBT or Linx, just use Prime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
^ This

Try lowering your volts and test for stability. You may be putting more through it it needs and just creating more heat.

The company your bought it from likely didn't put much/any time into verifying it stable. It just put the volts needed for the worst chip it might have gotten. It's yours now. You can change whatever you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
You should have endeavoured to build that rig yourself for $1300 +/- and had the satisfaction of knowing it was set-up right. Just my two cents, but I wouldn't trust any custom rig from any 'Major Reseller' on this or any other planet in the known universe.
That being said I would also recommend double checking your H80 mounting, so many people don't take the time to set these correctly and just slap them on. Also regarding the 10c difference between core temps. I personally have built or helped build 4 Ivy i7 3770K systems with perfectly installed Noctua air coolers and Corsair H80/H100 kits and all of them had core temp differences of 7c to 10c. Attributable to the lousy Intel Tim job and completely unacceptable to me. For this reason I went with SB-E and soldered IHS. My i7 3820 with Noctua NH-C12P SE14 idles 30 32 33 33.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Just to give you a comparison, I run my i5-3570k on a ASRock Z77 Extreme6 at 4.2GHz using the stock voltage completely stable and my CPU temp tops out at 66 degrees under load using a Corsair H100. 4.2 was about the highest I could go without having to raise the voltage, which I wasn't looking to do with this Ivy Bridge build. I just wanted a modest overclock without having to increase voltage, and in turn trigger the diminishing returns of Ivy Bridge's heat curve.

I think if you scale back your multiplier to 42 (100x42 = 4200MHz) and reduce your voltage to stock I bet your temps come back into an acceptable range. Ivy Bridge simply doesn't handle increased voltage very well, as has been documented all over the place. Whatever company you bought your PC from really should be using Sandy Bridge CPUs in their "OC" models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,810 Posts
Lower the PLL voltage to 1.5, and the vcore to 1.2v And you will have better temps.

Mine has 4.5ghz at 1.2v and max 75 degrees under Intel Burn Test very high loops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Based on the speed I know for a fact it is not from my company. Since it is not let me lay it down we offer a 4.7 OC on the 3770k and our temps don't hit that high and we bench prime95 12-24 hours on each system while running furmark at the same time. We also don't crank the volts once we find stable we find what we can lower the volts to and stay stable. Please don't go bashing all major custom vendors based on a few of the piss poor ones out there. I will not name my company as I am not trying to plug sales.

Based on the SSs I would say try leaving the multi alone and drop the vcore to 1.22-1.23 that should run stable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
you need to lower your volts and start overclocking from stock clocks. you bought a factory overclock, which means it wasn't tailored for your chip.

too many noobs are cranking volts and starting straight away with a high overclock and then lowering it. with ivy bridge, you need to go the other way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you all for the feedback so far!
smile.gif


To answer some questions you guys have left... running Prime95 and Intel Burn Test for a few minutes... I see the max temperatures reached are about 5-10 degrees Celsius less than what I see with LinX. Either way, it doesn't really matter to me, because if one programs reaches a higher temp -- then I will focus my eyes on that program. LinX was also the program left on the desktop by the seller to check the "computer overclocking". Oddly enough, the programs left by them to check the hardware temperatures were too outdated to show the processor temperatures! Makes you wonder...

A lot of you guys have suggested to decrease the voltage, learn OCing, and/or lower the overclock to around 4.2ghz. My issue is that overclocking was default on this system (as in the system was listed as an overclocked computer and you had to check if you wanted it non-oc'd) and I purchased this system for that VERY REASON. No disrespect to you guys, but I simply don't have time to learn how to overclock, and if I did, I would have built this system myself.

In fact, if I had asked not to overclock it, I would have saved $69, and I also would have went to Costco to buy a similar system. And as I said before, I went with the default cpu cooling and case options by the seller of this system. I will check tomorrow to see if the H80 liquid cooling didn't become loose during shipping, but from what I remember, I highly doubt it.

Overall, I have 30 days to return this system, and I really want a full refund at this point. However, looking at their terms and conditions, I will have to prove this is a hardware issue or face a 15% restocking fee on a $2,000+ system. And the crappy part is their refunding doesn't even cover the shipping costs. Any tips (besides building a computer myself next time)?

IMO, if the system can't be properly cooled at 100% processing, then my investment is slowly wasting away as the life of the processor exponentially decreases. At this point, I can just see them asking me to re-seat the liquid cooling or bringing the overclocking down, which again defeats my intent of purchasing this machine to begin with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
Yes your running double the radiator he is running. your temps dont mean squat compared to his.

To the OP, you need to run a push pull setup on that h80 and have it intake fresh air.
Also lowering the vcore in the bios will be way less time consuming then trying to send the computer back. If you don't have time for overclocking, then overclocking doesn't have time for you.
Not trying to be rude, I just think people have way to much money to be "buying an overclock".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
921 Posts
It's also worthwhile to keep in mind that LinX is simulating loads that you as a consumer will almost never be subjecting your CPU to. Measure the CPU temp in a game or something like that to get a more realistic measurement.

Of course it doesn't hurt to learn a bit about overclocking to you can optimize your system a little more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by konspiracy View Post

Yes your running double the radiator he is running. your temps dont mean squat compared to his.
To the OP, you need to run a push pull setup on that h80 and have it intake fresh air.
Also lowering the vcore in the bios will be way less time consuming then trying to send the computer back. If you don't have time for overclocking, then overclocking doesn't have time for you.
Not trying to be rude, I just think people have way to much money to be "buying an overclock".
The more I think about this, the more I am considering the option of just lowering the vcore and keeping the system. How would I go about doing this?

And what about lowering the PLL voltage (as some have said)? What is the difference between PLL and Vcore voltages? I guess I got to learn... as always, I appreciate the help you guys.
smile.gif
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top