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Discussion Starter #1
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With the rise of streaming services, piracy may arguably be less widespread than it once was, but copyright holders are still doing everything they can to make life difficult for pirates. One anti-piracy firm by the name of Rightscorp is taking an approach to curbing piracy that doesn't seem like it will win the company any friends on either side of the issue.
Rightscorp is the company behind Scalable Copyright, which it calls a "next-generation technology" that forces users to pay for pirated content. In reality, it sounds an awful lot like the ransomware that has been plaguing the Web for some time. The technology essentially locks a suspected pirate's browser until they pay a fine, which Rightscorp refers to as a "settlement,"
http://www.digitaltrends.com/web/anti-piracy-group-rightscorp-wants-to-hijack-browsers/#ixzz44sizqbh3

rolleyes.gif
 

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lolwut
 

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I dunno what I'm doing.
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And they wonder why they're losing money hand over fist...
 

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Some how I see this as incredibly illegal. Not to mention there are so many ways around it that it is more of a short term issue, plus if they only jack the browser, then you can probably just find their file in your browser folder and remove it lol.
 

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This is basically ransomware like cryptolocker but on a smaller scale.
How in the world do they think they can get away with this?
 

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Reject the system
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'Show us your papers'

Guilty till proven innocent. This will NEVER fly. I can't believe it even made it past a group of people where one person didn't say 'how is this legal, again?'
 
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Yeah, this is how you prevent piracy. You install a cryptolocker that blocks the browsers of "suspected" pirates and then ask them for money to unlock. This is definitely not illegal in any way at all. It's also a much better solution over making their content officially more accessible though legitimate streaming services such as Netflix or Amazon Prime, or even starting their own streaming service.
:rolleyes:
 

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Isn't this just a step up from sending out letters to "suspected" pirates threatening to sue them for hundreds of thousands of dollars unless they admit they were guilty and pay a few hundred?

And wasn't that declared illegal in many jurisdictions?

And aren't they just taking the law into their own hands? Pretty sure vigilantism is frowned upon by most law enforcement agencies.

Also, punishment taking place before any kind of trial is pretty much backwards too.

Basically, I can see this lasting a week before this company gets their ass handed to them in court.
 

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Just curious, by their "logic" shouldn't we be "legally" allowed to hack into their devices and install ransomware for trying to steal functionality from our computers? I mean it seems to me that if they can do it we can too.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
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Originally Posted by GingerJohn View Post

Isn't this just a step up from sending out letters to "suspected" pirates threatening to sue them for hundreds of thousands of dollars unless they admit they were guilty and pay a few hundred?

And wasn't that declared illegal in many jurisdictions?

And aren't they just taking the law into their own hands? Pretty sure vigilantism is frowned upon by most law enforcement agencies.

Also, punishment taking place before any kind of trial is pretty much backwards too.

Basically, I can see this lasting a week before this company gets their ass handed to them in court.
they actually lost a case along with others 2 months ago because they were harassing people over telephone calls
https://torrentfreak.com/accused-pirates-win-class-action-settlement-from-rightscorp-and-warner-bros-160112/

they just never learn this time if they actually do this it will be their undoing literally
 

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Sounds more like a DNS redirect than a direct browser hijack.

Still absurd, and if I saw such a redirect, I'd immediately switch ISPs.
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Originally Posted by serothis View Post

How is this not a text book example of extortion?
I ask the same question regarding taxation.
 

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Someday this might be a viable legal option. The government might be able to talk the public into believing that this is legal and necessary, but Hollywood can't. A few years ago, when pirated content was kind of something illusive that only "geeks" could get, people might have allowed government action like this. The media and government were accusing pirates of destroying American creativity.. The country was actually fairly unified in "the war on piracy." And then it just fizzled out; they never produced any real results after working so hard to get the public on their side.

Nowadays they'd never get the government's legal support for this kind of ransomware.. But they were pretty close. I remember those television ads showing a thief stealing DVD's from the store and going to jail. Then they lectured you on how "stealing is stealing" and talked about insane copyright penalties.

Americans aren't as afraid of pirates as they are of terrorists, though. The bloodthirst for pirates seems to have worn off pretty fast and no one is going to accept a "reinterpretation" of their rights for the sake of fighting piracy. I wonder what made them stop running ads like that; they were working.

Anyway, I'm pretty sure we'll see a return of all that eventually. America has bigger priorities right now, that's all.
 
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