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Discussion Starter #1
As we all know, M.2 PCIe SSDs overheat.

I know people have stuck ramsinks onto desktop-mounted M.2 SSDs with great results, but there's no way that's going to fit in a laptop. Is there anything like that that's more uhh, low profile?
 

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Thermal pads don't really do anything without medium which will transfer heat away (radiator). I don't know how much space you have, but outside ultra low profile heatsinks there is not much you can do. If M.2 chamber/slot is not big enough consider little Dremel job. Cut away external plastic shroud and put nice heatsinks or just cut cooling vents to provide fresh air above the drive. A bit extreme way, but it works wonders for M.2 temperatures.
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Still if M.2 SSD is double sided model, then one side will always be hot.

Like BCC9 from Enzotech. Only 9mm of height, but with little effort it can be 4 or 5.
 

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Sometimes, even just a flat piece of aluminum or copper that has more surface area will do the trick. Not sure about cooling an SSD, but I don't imagine it would put off much heat, and this would likely be sufficient. I am trying to think of OEM products that have used a similar cooling set-up, but I can't think of anything off the top of my head...it's fairly common to see though in various electronics. So just try a chunk of flat aluminium in whatever size and thickness you think you can fit in the space there. You can even cut down some little ram-sinks or something and sand them to mostly flat. You can attach the flat heat sink with some double sided thermal tape, or get some thermal adhesive, both will work. Make the heat-sink have as much surface area as you can fit in the space you have available. but be sure to leave an air gap so air can still flow around it. If it is fitting right up against the outer case of the laptop, you could use some single sided thermal tape between the heat sink and the case, but if the case is plastic, that isn't going to do much.

Like this, if the drawing makes sense to you -

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ypsylon View Post

Thermal pads don't really do anything without medium which will transfer heat away
Right! I guess that particular pad is designed to transfer the heat to MBA chassis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The SSD Review
"... a rather prominent non-removable heat sink that sticks to the base of your Mac Book Air, once installed."
As the Macbook's shell is made of aluminum, that's a nice solution that basically turns the laptop's case into a large efficient heatsink for the SSD.

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TELVM View Post

As the Macbook's shell is made of aluminum, that's a nice solution that basically turns the laptop's case into a large efficient heatsink for the SSD.

Yes with alu simple thermal pads will do the trick, unfortunately plastic is pain when comes to heat transfer. It's much better at storing heat than transferring it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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They only overheat if you do a LOT, and I mean, a LOT of writing/reading, i.e., way more than the capacity of the ssd. Right now my 950 pro 512gb is idling at 46C and there is no fans in my PC except the power supply.
 

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A laptop and PC are not comparable when it comes to cooling, if they were then low power chips wouldn't be necessary.
 
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