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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This CNET article says 3.7 GB. Mine is 3.09 GB. I downloaded it 3 times because I thought that it didn't finish the first time: the first time, it came out to be about 3.52 or 3.53 GB. The 2nd and 3rd, 3.09 GB. How did I get a difference that big? What's the size of your .ISO?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ok, now this is interesting. I downloaded this one to a different location on my drive, and it's 3.53 GB just like the first one. The 2nd and 3rd ones were overwriting the first. This 4th one was not overwriting one, but it was in its own folder.

Edit: What the.... now the one that was 3.09 GB is showing as 3.53 GB.
 

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Got my 8.1 Enterprise Iso from technet. It should be 3625mb or round 3756kb

Please vertify your download from the technet page. http://technet.microsoft.com/subscriptions/downloads/hh442904#searchTerm=Windows%208.1%20Enterprise&ProductFamilyId=0&Languages=en&PageSize=100&PageIndex=0&FileId=0

However you can do a hashcheck with hashmyfilesv1

Checksums:
version: 6.3.9600
Windows 8.1 Enterprise (x64) - DVD (English)
Release Date: 17.10.2013
Languages: English
File name: en_windows_8_1_enterprise_x64_dvd_2971902.iso
SHA1: AE792B2EF982DAC7391224B624EAB8D6340D78AB
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh, now I know why the CNET article said that it should be around 3.7 GB. This is the exact file size:

3.53 GB (3,797,866,496 bytes)

Any geek who knows anything should know to device this by 1024 by 1024 by 1024. Doing that shows that it's exactly 3.537038803100586 GB. I guess they just don't have a clue. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by c3p0c3p0 View Post

Small calculator error. Had that discussion once with my isp. About how to measure 1 gigabyte traffic. Found out they don't do math that much
biggrin.gif
LOL I can imagine what they said!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

Oh, now I know why the CNET article said that it should be around 3.7 GB. This is the exact file size:

3.53 GB (3,797,866,496 bytes)

Any geek who knows anything should know to device this by 1024 by 1024 by 1024. Doing that shows that it's exactly 3.537038803100586 GB. I guess they just don't have a clue.
smile.gif
I am a geek that knows a lot about this topic, and I am here to tell you that they calculated it correctly (OK, nearly; they should have rounded 3.7 to 3.8 because of the 9). 1 GB is exactly 1000 MB. Officially, and logically so. If you want to know how many GiB it is (a silly, non-logical unit of measure from a human standpoint), divide by 1024 over and over again. So officially, the file is 3.80 GB, 3.54 GiB. Many websites-and Windows itself-calculate file size incorrectly, people got used to it, and some people even think that they are entitled to the extra space or bandwidth.
rolleyes.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

I am a geek that knows a lot about this topic, and I am here to tell you that they calculated it correctly (OK, nearly; they should have rounded 3.7 to 3.8 because of the 9). 1 GB is exactly 1000 MB. Officially, and logically so. If you want to know how many GiB it is (a silly, non-logical unit of measure from a human standpoint), divide by 1024 over and over again. So officially, the file is 3.80 GB, 3.54 GiB. Many websites-and Windows itself-calculate file size incorrectly, people got used to it, and some people even think that they are entitled to the extra space or bandwidth.
rolleyes.gif
I know, however, I'm going by the illogical standard.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

Many websites-and Windows itself-calculate file size incorrectly, people got used to it, and some people even think that they are entitled to the extra space or bandwidth.
rolleyes.gif
That isn't true. Using 1024 instead of 1000 is not in any way "incorrect". 1024 is what the number comes out to in binary, which is what computers use. The only reason Hard drive manufacturers and ISP's use 1000 instead of 1024 is it gives them a larger number to advertise.

I would argue that using 1000 for computer storage doesn't make any sense, and is the illogical standard
tongue.gif
.
 

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For most of modern computing history, 1 GB = 1024 MB, and 1 MB = 1024 KB, and 1 KB = 1024 bytes. It was only when hard drive manufacturers learned that they could use a nice, round 1000 for each of those figures, and make people think they were getting larger drives than they actually were, that we were stuck with this "GB" and "GiB" nonsense that we have today.

Windows doesn't calculate size incorrectly. It actually does it the correct way. Computers work in base-two, not base-10, and using base-two numbers is the correct way to measure storage capacity. We use base two for RAM, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yep, always divide or multiply by 1024.
 
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