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Discussion Starter #1
I will be bending tubing for the first time this next week as I begin the assembly on my first build.

I did not include a drain line in the loop. Is that a huge requirement or is there an easy way to drain things when necessary? Initially my loop will only be for a monoblock, but I will later extend it to a GTX1180, once they are readily avaialble in the future.

How does one go about draining a system to add additional tubing to it, if they don't have a drain line outlet?
 

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You haven't started the loop yet, add a drain valve into your plan. It will save you a big mess later down the road if you ever have to service your loop.
 

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Without a drain? Crack a fitting and let it leak, or connect some tubing to an open port (again hoping it won't leak in the process).

Without quick disconnects there is no good way to drain a loop without a drain port unless you can attach tubing to a port at the highest point in the loop without it leaking (like the top of a rad) and then start tilting the case.

Add the drain - a drain at the lowest point in the system with a removable plug somewhere near the high point (to allow air in) will allow you to drain a loop in under 10 minutes with no leakage.
 

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I've built them both with and without, but I much prefer having one. It doesn't have to be a valve, any T-line arrangement with a plug on it will suffice. At the very least plan to have a fitting at a low point and away from any sensitive components that you can disconnect to drain the loop.

Edit: how I set up my drain point

\Edit

With drain valve:

  1. Put bowl under valve
  2. Open valve and reservoir fill port
  3. Wait for loop to drain


Without drain valve:

  1. Open top of reservoir
  2. Hold computer upside down above bathtub
  3. Shake computer
  4. Realise how heavy computer is
  5. Feel the burn
  6. Don't drop computer!
  7. Hold it! Just a little longer!
  8. Put down computer
  9. Wait until blood returns to arms
  10. Check water level
  11. What? Still mostly full? How can this be?
  12. Repeat steps 2 - 10
  13. Curse your past self
  14. Vow to always have a drain valve in future builds

OK, I'm exaggerating a bit, but not all that much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've built them both with and without, but I much prefer having one. It doesn't have to be a valve, any T-line arrangement with a plug on it will suffice. At the very least plan to have a fitting at a low point and away from any sensitive components that you can disconnect to drain the loop.

Edit: how I set up my drain point

\Edit

With drain valve:

  1. Put bowl under valve
  2. Open valve and reservoir fill port
  3. Wait for loop to drain


Without drain valve:

  1. Open top of reservoir
  2. Hold computer upside down above bathtub
  3. Shake computer
  4. Realise how heavy computer is
  5. Feel the burn
  6. Don't drop computer!
  7. Hold it! Just a little longer!
  8. Put down computer
  9. Wait until blood returns to arms
  10. Check water level
  11. What? Still mostly full? How can this be?
  12. Repeat steps 2 - 10
  13. Curse your past self
  14. Vow to always have a drain valve in future builds

OK, I'm exaggerating a bit, but not all that much.
OK. You've convinced me. Guess I'll go find a Y or T valve to put at the low point on the outlet of my pump...and a fitting that I can use to break the airgap at the top of my radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, what's the best method for routing the outlet from the pump? Up to radiator and then from radiator to CPU, or should it go from pump directly to CPU and then back to radiator?

And, I JUST received the order from the Florida reseller. Impressions: The Monoblock is HUGE and HEAVY. I expected something less substantial.

Strangely, the clear plastic security tape round device was torn on my D5's box. That didnt' make me feel too good, but everthing seemed undisturbed within the box. I hope it's not a returned item from someone. The plastic bag inside the D5's box was not opened, at least if someone did so they had to have VERY carefully not torn the security tape on it. It fell apart on me when I tried to even very carefully remove it.

The box for the radiator is also a bit ragged around the edges, and a bit torn. I can't help but wonder if I'm being send the second tier items or things that have been returned/opened! The monoblock's box also had it's security tape items loosened.

The fan boxes are perfectly taped and s how no sign of having been opened or fiddled with.

Is this typical for the vendor Performance-PCs or just typical for cross-country shipments????
 

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Overclocker in training
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Hi,
Hard tubing yeah got to use a drain valve :)
 

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So, what's the best method for routing the outlet from the pump? Up to radiator and then from radiator to CPU, or should it go from pump directly to CPU and then back to radiator?

And, I JUST received the order from the Florida reseller. Impressions: The Monoblock is HUGE and HEAVY. I expected something less substantial.

Strangely, the clear plastic security tape round device was torn on my D5's box. That didnt' make me feel too good, but everthing seemed undisturbed within the box. I hope it's not a returned item from someone. The plastic bag inside the D5's box was not opened, at least if someone did so they had to have VERY carefully not torn the security tape on it. It fell apart on me when I tried to even very carefully remove it.

The box for the radiator is also a bit ragged around the edges, and a bit torn. I can't help but wonder if I'm being send the second tier items or things that have been returned/opened! The monoblock's box also had it's security tape items loosened.

The fan boxes are perfectly taped and s how no sign of having been opened or fiddled with.

Is this typical for the vendor Performance-PCs or just typical for cross-country shipments????

As far as your loop is concerned, before I built mine I researched about the order in which to hook everything up. From what I gathered, it really doesn't matter. Just route the tubing in a manner that will not impede PC serviceability. Ideally, after the PC is on for a bit, the temperature of your loop should stabilize at a temp of about 3-5 degrees above ambient. If you didn't get one already, Bitspower makes nice inline temp probes that should be able to be plugged into a temp sensor header on your MOBO. This is for idle temps. The closer to ambient you can get, the better. My loop with CPU idle, is 2 degrees above ambient. which I think is pretty good. It will take a while to figure out what the ideal speeds for your fans and pump should be to maintain that idle temp. Of course, under load or benchmarking, your fans should be at 100%.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OK, ordered an EKWB 3-splitter, two small 6mm m/m extenders, a ball valve and one 20mm m/f extender just to play it safe. That will take care of adding a drain at the base of my pump outlet. As far as providing an air gap at the top, I think I'l just loosen the radiator tube, or drill a hole in it. When I need to extend my system I may elect to re-tube it in acrylic after I've done it with PETG first.
 

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WaterCooler & Overclocker
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2,590 Posts
I've built them both with and without, but I much prefer having one. It doesn't have to be a valve, any T-line arrangement with a plug on it will suffice. At the very least plan to have a fitting at a low point and away from any sensitive components that you can disconnect to drain the loop.

Edit: how I set up my drain point

\Edit

With drain valve:

  1. Put bowl under valve
  2. Open valve and reservoir fill port
  3. Wait for loop to drain


Without drain valve:

  1. Open top of reservoir
  2. Hold computer upside down above bathtub
  3. Shake computer
  4. Realise how heavy computer is
  5. Feel the burn
  6. Don't drop computer!
  7. Hold it! Just a little longer!
  8. Put down computer
  9. Wait until blood returns to arms
  10. Check water level
  11. What? Still mostly full? How can this be?
  12. Repeat steps 2 - 10
  13. Curse your past self
  14. Vow to always have a drain valve in future builds

OK, I'm exaggerating a bit, but not all that much.
This just made my day :D


GingerJohn nailed it... you for sure want a drain valve in there!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
This just made my day :D


GingerJohn nailed it... you for sure want a drain valve in there!
Yeah, you guys convinced me.

My Thermaltake Core P5 arrives on Monday. Now I just have to find a way to mount the EK D5 REVO pump to it. I really don’t want to drill holes through the backplate, so I think I’ll use a “L” shaped piece of metal that I can attach to the P5’s pump platform instead.

I’d like to have the “L” ready to go. Does anyone have a P5 case with that small platform on it? If so, can you measurei it and tell me how wide it is and how far I sticks out proud of the backplate?
 

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OK, ordered an EKWB 3-splitter, two small 6mm m/m extenders, a ball valve and one 20mm m/f extender just to play it safe. That will take care of adding a drain at the base of my pump outlet. As far as providing an air gap at the top, I think I'l just loosen the radiator tube, or drill a hole in it. When I need to extend my system I may elect to re-tube it in acrylic after I've done it with PETG first.
Definitely wouldn't drill a hole as I don't see anyway you wouldn't lose at least a little coolant out of said hole. I just put EK's multi-port top on my res so that one of the spare ports can just be loosened to allow air in. Works just fine, though I do have to do some minor tilting of the case because one tube runs slightly lower than the drain. But no big deal. The multi-port top also makes filling the system a breeze since the loop terminates at the top of my res.

Another easy way to let air in is if you have a radiator that has spare top ports like this one

EDIT - is your D5 the standalone pump or did you get the pump/res combo? Also, looking at this, going off of the dimensions of one of thermaltake's reservoirs would probably give you a decent estimate if nobody around here can give you the exact measurments.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Definitely wouldn't drill a hole as I don't see anyway you wouldn't lose at least a little coolant out of said hole. I just put EK's multi-port top on my res so that one of the spare ports can just be loosened to allow air in. Works just fine, though I do have to do some minor tilting of the case because one tube runs slightly lower than the drain. But no big deal. The multi-port top also makes filling the system a breeze since the loop terminates at the top of my res.

Another easy way to let air in is if you have a radiator that has spare top ports like this one

EDIT - is your D5 the standalone pump or did you get the pump/res combo? Also, looking at this, going off of the dimensions of one of thermaltake's reservoirs would probably give you a decent estimate if nobody around here can give you the exact measurments.
My D5 is the combo unit, with the standard (small) reservoir and a single port at the top. I have the CE420 rad, not sure if it has a third port, I will look today.

Speaking of which, does it matter if the two ports on the rad are at the top, or bottom for the in/out lines? Is it preferable to have them at the bottom? That’s the way the logo seems to read, but that makes for a longer tube run to the cpu.
 

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I don't think any EK rads have a third port. As far as the orientation of the radiator, it isn't going to make a difference in terms of functionality unless you were to put something near it that would impede airflow or something. Just orient it however you need to get the aesthetics your're looking for when it comes to your tubing runs but you don't want to make doing the runs an impossible task either. Longer runs aren't necessarily harder because if the run has multiple bends, they are likely further apart. From my experience, the distance between bends is the deciding factor. I had a few runs where 2 bends were simply too close together (heating up the tube to do the 2nd bend would soften the first bend right next to it and then I'd either end up with bubbled tube or nothing lined up) and I had to go another route, which I ended up liking just as much. If you want to see some of the issues you can run into (and there are many), check out my build log in my sig.

I originally wanted that CE420 rad as I recall but was encouraged to get a 360mm radiator instead due to having a larger selection of fans to choose from. They weren't wrong, there definitely is a bigger selection, but I ended up going with fans that are also available in a 140mm size... (granted their color scheme at that size was awful).
 
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