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I am curious how people do this, do you completely drain the loop in the yearly maintenance? This is for a distilled + biocide loop (no dyes, etc)

1) Do you completely drain the loop, take apart, and flush parts or is this only needed when performance is caused by gunk in blocks?
2) Do you run the hose that returns to the res into a bucket, plug then hole in the res, then just flush the loop by adding more water to the res and cycling the pump? This seems like the best method, unless you have like gunk in your micro channels. Though I am knew to this, so who knows.

I am redoing a couple parts in my loop and I am wondering if I should put the drain valve on the pump top, which is the second lowest spot on my loop, or if I should put it in lowest spot, which is on the a 240mm port.

I know if I put it on the lower rad it will drain a part of the 240 rad as well as the res, though it makes a return line to the res more difficult as it will be a little to close to the pump top. It would also require additional parts, which means additional points of failure.

If I can just flush it out by having the 240 going into the bucket, then it won't matter. Just keep res full, run pump, and fill up res, rinse/repeat, until you are sure you got everything out.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solarity View Post

I am curious how people do this, do you completely drain the loop in the yearly maintenance? This is for a distilled + biocide loop (no dyes, etc)

1) Do you completely drain the loop, take apart, and flush parts or is this only needed when performance is caused by gunk in blocks?
2) Do you run the hose that returns to the res into a bucket, plug then hole in the res, then just flush the loop by adding more water to the res and cycling the pump? This seems like the best method, unless you have like gunk in your micro channels. Though I am knew to this, so who knows.

I am redoing a couple parts in my loop and I am wondering if I should put the drain valve on the pump top, which is the second lowest spot on my loop, or if I should put it in lowest spot, which is on the a 240mm port.

I know if I put it on the lower rad it will drain a part of the 240 rad as well as the res, though it makes a return line to the res more difficult as it will be a little to close to the pump top. It would also require additional parts, which means additional points of failure.

If I can just flush it out by having the 240 going into the bucket, then it won't matter. Just keep res full, run pump, and fill up res, rinse/repeat, until you are sure you got everything out.
1. You only need to pull the blocks apart if you can see gunk in there and/or you notice a drop in cooling performance.
2. Yes thats how I do it, works well.
Put drain valve at the lowest point in the loop
smile.gif
 

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When I tear everything down, I try to see if I can spot any gunk through the outlet hole of my CPU block, if I do, or the copper is really discolored, I will give it a vinegar bath. The GPU block has a clear acrylic top, so that is easy to check. If I have plasticizer build up (I thought this tubing said plasticizer free!) I will do vinegar and a good scrubbing, Careful with reassembly and ALWAYS LEAK TEST!

Forgot to do that once after block cleaning and reassembly and ruined a perfectly good 8800GT years ago with a single drop of water that leaked out after about 12 hours.

Already made sure I will have a drain port in my next loop...I've been slacking.
 
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