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Discussion Starter #1
I have a tap that has a 7/16" square butt on it. I am wondering if there is an adapter that I can get for it that will allow me to fit it into my 8" drill press. It is just a hair too big to fit into the chuck. Don't worry I know how to tap, I will only be using the drill press to keep it perfectly straight, while I will manually spin the chuck with my hand for the tapping. Any ideas?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Timlander View Post
I have a tap that has a 7/16" square butt on it. I am wondering if there is an adapter that I can get for it that will allow me to fit it into my 8" drill press. It is just a hair too big to fit into the chuck. Don't worry I know how to tap, I will only be using the drill press to keep it perfectly straight, while I will manually spin the chuck with my hand for the tapping. Any ideas?
Tried it, using your hand works better. It becomes a task to turn the chuck by hand.

What I do, I have a small piece of metal that is about the thickness less than the material I am tapping (a bit less). I drill a hole slightly larger than the tap with my drill press and use that as a guide to go straight down. You need to make sure you have enough of the tap sticking out the bottom to finish the tap though.

So say the material is 1/16 and the tap is 1.5" long, I would make a block that is about 1.2" tall and drill a hole in the center then use that to guide the tap straight down.

That or you could rig up a hand drill and mount it straight down since you would be able to control the speed of the drill by hand with the trigger.
 

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what always do in situations like this is put a dead or running center in my drill and push the point into the center hole at the back of the tap but i imagine my drill press is bigger then yours .but a smaller sharp pointy tap placed in the chuck and put in the center hole should be just as effective
 
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I know just what you are trying to do. Having drilled and tapped hundreds of G-1/4 ports and being too cheap to get a proper drill press I adapted some tricks to make sure I get a nice perpendicular hole.

Easiest way to go is take a piece of scrap ply and drill a hole in it. 3/4" or doubled is best. The thickness of the material "straightens" the tap as you twist through it. Unfortunately the softness of the material means you only get a few holes before it's useless. Using that little jig you can hand tap or use a hand drill to get the job done.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by Shrimpykins View Post
Tried it, using your hand works better. It becomes a task to turn the chuck by hand.

What I do, I have a small piece of metal that is about the thickness less than the material I am tapping (a bit less). I drill a hole slightly larger than the tap with my drill press and use that as a guide to go straight down. You need to make sure you have enough of the tap sticking out the bottom to finish the tap though.

So say the material is 1/16 and the tap is 1.5" long, I would make a block that is about 1.2" tall and drill a hole in the center then use that to guide the tap straight down.

That or you could rig up a hand drill and mount it straight down since you would be able to control the speed of the drill by hand with the trigger.

Quote:

Originally Posted by CyberDruid View Post
I know just what you are trying to do. Having drilled and tapped hundreds of G-1/4 ports and being too cheap to get a proper drill press I adapted some tricks to make sure I get a nice perpendicular hole.

Easiest way to go is take a piece of scrap ply and drill a hole in it. 3/4" or doubled is best. The thickness of the material "straightens" the tap as you twist through it. Unfortunately the softness of the material means you only get a few holes before it's useless. Using that little jig you can hand tap or use a hand drill to get the job done.
Very interesting. Both of these ideas seem to suggest about the same thing. Its a very good idea, thanks to both of you and I will try this right now.
 

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My G-1/4 (BSPP 1/4 actually) tap was a touch large to fit in my cordless. I carefully resized it enough to slip in. It's not a perfect solution like the one Tribal Overkill came up with (reversible mod to his 3/4" chuck Delta DP), but it'll Git r Done.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by CyberDruid View Post
My G-1/4 (BSPP 1/4 actually) tap was a touch large to fit in my cordless. I carefully resized it enough to slip in. It's not a perfect solution like the one Tribal Overkill came up with (reversible mod to his 3/4" chuck Delta DP), but it'll Git r Done.
yep as long as it gets the job done. I will try your method, im sure it will do good enough. I did it by hand with a crescent wrench and the barb and standoff fit perfectly.







 

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Yep unless you are making bunches of tapped holes you can do them just as you show with a crescent wrench.

What sucks is screwing up a hole in a piece that has a lot of work in it
. Easy fix? Glue another piece over the bad hole. Tap the little piece perfectly first, then cut it out and round over the edges and polish them and it'll look like you meant to do it that way
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Quote:

Originally Posted by CyberDruid View Post
Yep unless you are making bunches of tapped holes you can do them just as you show with a crescent wrench.

What sucks is screwing up a hole in a piece that has a lot of work in it
. Easy fix? Glue another piece over the bad hole. Tap the little piece perfectly first, then cut it out and round over the edges and polish them and it'll look like you meant to do it that way

Man that is another great fix idea hehe
. I will seriously have to do that if I mess up, but i still hope i dont in the first place.
 
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