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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to install Ubuntu studio on a second partition to dual boot with Win 7.

I created two partitions in Win7. Booted from the Ubuntu CD and am at the partitioning part of the setup.

It says;

"This is an overview of your currently configured partitions and mount points. Seect a partition to modify it's settings (file system, mount points etc.), a free space to create partitions, or a device to initialise its partition table."

Below that, there is a list of drives;

SCSI1 (0,0,0) (sda)
#1 primary 166.9 GB ntfs
#2 primary 83.1 GB ntfs

and more...

I want to use the #2 partition here. The 83.1 GB one.

If i hit enter with '#2' selected, I get different options.

It says,

"Use as: ntfs

Mount point: none

Botable flag: off"

Are these settings correct?

Then there are options

"Resize partition
copy data from another partition
erase data on this partition
delete the partition
done setting up the partition"

If I select "done setting up the partition" it takes me back to the list of drives.

The partition is freshly formatted (zero data).

What should I do?

Thanks a lot
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks.

Will Wubi

a) allow a nice easy dual boot option at startup?

b) install Ubuntu on a seperate partition of the Win7 OS?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by makecoldplayhistory View Post
Thanks.

Will Wubi

a) allow a nice easy dual boot option at startup?

b) install Ubuntu on a seperate partition of the Win7 OS?
a) yes
b) Just format the other separate partition to NTFS and select it in Wubi

it's really dead simple solution
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If this is as great as it sounds, then there are millions of posters all of the interwebs who need this link.

Thanks a lot.

Mike
 

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I still don't understand why you manually partitioned the drive when Ubuntu can do all of that for you...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
SZayat - thanks, it worked amazingly well and easily.

TFB - because I didn't know any better. A lot of advice on the internet isn't as good as what you get on OCN


I was petrified of formatting my Win7 disc so wanted to keep it all very clear.

In future, I'll know!
 

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Wubi is stupid to use. Just install it directly onto the partition. NTFS should NOT be used if possible, but rather something like ext4 or btrfs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by gonX View Post
Wubi is stupid to use. Just install it directly onto the partition. NTFS should NOT be used if possible, but rather something like ext4 or btrfs.

Okay... why is Wubi "stupid" and what's wrong with NTFS?
 

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Wubi puts a file system inside a file system using a file - this creates an immense amount of overhead that is basically not really needed. NTFS is known for its fragmentation problems and it's scarce support to the way Linux handles files.
You're not going to be able to access files you install inside Linux anyway - so why bother with a slower computer for no extra convenience? The standard Ubuntu installer should ask you to install it next to Windows with no added convenience - if it does not, you can specify it to install to the 2nd 80GB partition you had with a different file system.
The bootloader configuration should automatically find your Windows install, and if it does not, it's not hard to fix. Wubi is for people who do not wish to repartition.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by makecoldplayhistory
View Post

Okay... why is Wubi "stupid" and what's wrong with NTFS?

I haven't used it, but it just seems like an extra step that can be accomplished within the Ubuntu installer, without having to format the partition again. I stand corrected by gonx ^.

NTFS is the Windows NT filesystem. *nix uses other filesystems.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by gonX
View Post

Wubi puts a file system inside a file system using a file - this creates an immense amount of overhead that is basically not really needed. NTFS is known for its fragmentation problems and it's scarce support to the way Linux handles files.
You're not going to be able to access files you install inside Linux anyway - so why bother with a slower computer for no extra convenience? The standard Ubuntu installer should ask you to install it next to Windows with no added convenience - if it does not, you can specify it to install to the 2nd 80GB partition you had with a different file system.
The bootloader configuration should automatically find your Windows install, and if it does not, it's not hard to fix. Wubi is for people who do not wish to repartition.

Actually, Windows can easily read Linux partitions. All you have to do is install a service that treats them like a native partition. To do this, I downloaded Ext2. Since it was not designed for Windows 7, you have to run the installer in compatibility mode for Windows Vista SP2 and it installs perfectly. I access my Linux stuff all the time and have read and write permissions.

Here's a link to that:
http://www.fs-driver.org/download.html

Also, when installing Ubuntu, you'll want to make two separate partitions. One is a system or boot partition and the other is your home partition. When you select the mount point, select the first one on the list which I believe is "/". I can't quite recall the rest.

It's actually very easy to do. Here's the guide I used:

http://mesanna.com/2009/01/17/how-to...-on-an-eee-pc/

Ignore the fact that it's pink and girly, there's good advice there.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by xxbassplayerxx
View Post

Actually, Windows can easily read Linux partitions. All you have to do is install a service that treats them like a native partition. To do this, I downloaded Ext2. Since it was not designed for Windows 7, you have to run the installer in compatibility mode for Windows Vista SP2 and it installs perfectly. I access my Linux stuff all the time and have read and write permissions.

Here's a link to that:
http://www.fs-driver.org/download.html

Also, when installing Ubuntu, you'll want to make two separate partitions. One is a system or boot partition and the other is your home partition. When you select the mount point, select the first one on the list which I believe is "/". I can't quite recall the rest.

It's actually very easy to do. Here's the guide I used:

http://mesanna.com/2009/01/17/how-to...-on-an-eee-pc/

Ignore the fact that it's pink and girly, there's good advice there.

Only ext2 and ext3 is supported. Hardly anybody uses that with a recent distro - what about ext4? And btrfs? And jfs and xfs which has been around for longer than ext3?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hahaha.

Thanks for the posts, but you realise that what most have you have said is exactly the reason that most people like me stay away from Linux. Wubi is the kind of thing that will attract a lot of people like me.

I'm more than happy to give a "proper" install a go.

So...

1. format the partition on my C: that has Ubuntu and then remove it - make the C: drive one drive again.

2. insert CD and set BIOS to boot from CD.

It's the next bit that got me stuck in the first place, made me post this thread and eventaully use Wubi.

When I get the below text (although this time there will only be 1 partition on the C: drive, what should I do? I guess, select the C: drive (SCSI1 (0,0,0) (sda) #1 primary). Then what? Change the "mount point"? Change the "bootable flag"?

Thanks a lot.

Quote:


"This is an overview of your currently configured partitions and mount points. Seect a partition to modify it's settings (file system, mount points etc.), a free space to create partitions, or a device to initialise its partition table."

Below that, there is a list of drives;

SCSI1 (0,0,0) (sda)
#1 primary 166.9 GB ntfs
#2 primary 83.1 GB ntfs

and more...

I want to use the #2 partition here. The 83.1 GB one.

If i hit enter with '#2' selected, I get different options.

It says,

"Use as: ntfs

Mount point: none

Bootable flag: off"

Are these settings correct?

Then there are options

"Resize partition
copy data from another partition
erase data on this partition
delete the partition
done setting up the partition"


GonX - you say I need two partitions. Should I make those in Win7 (Easeus Partition Manager) but leave them unformatted?
 

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Most people recommend a swap partition, but as long as you have more than 2 gigs of RAM that really isn't necessary for office use.
Set mount point to / - it's the root directory, the very highest level of a system.
After doing that you'll get presented with a couple of new options. Set file system (or format as) to ext4.
Bootable flag is not necessary IIRC as it's legacy only, but it can't hurt setting it to be honest.

With the exception of those things you should be good to go. It'll probably alert you about not setting a swap drive - but you can skip that warning, it won't affect you as long as you have more than 2 gigs as I said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by TFB
View Post

No, Ubuntu will partition the disks for you. It will set all that stuff up for you.

But the problem is, it didn't, or I didn't understand how to.

See my original post in this thread.

1. Are you saying that if I only have one partition when I begin installing Ubuntu, I'll get different options during the install?

2. Was it because I'd created a partition already that it got to the confusing,

"This is an overview of your currently configured partitions and mount points. Seect a partition to modify it's settings (file system, mount points etc.), a free space to create partitions, or a device to initialise its partition table."?

Thanks all for your help.
 
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