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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, i currently have a 3930k at 4.6ghz on water, running stable no issues or bottleneck at all, but i just bought a xeon E5-2690 v2 10 cores/20 threads for a stupid price (200$) shipped. I couldnt resist.. i also sold my 3930k for 100$.. i know xeon does not oc well but i will reach 3.6ghz which is good.

My question is, did i make a mistake? Basically was only 100$ "investment"
 

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Do you do anything on the computer that enjoys multiple cores?

You will lose some performance during older games that like 1/2/4 cores, since you dont have an extra 1ghz core speed....

But I think it sounds like a heck of a nice upgrade if you can benefit from the extra core count.

I certainly would not turn down a chance to get an extra 4/8 cores/threads, even with the small downgrade in core clock.

That xeon might actually overclock quite well, who knows.


It certainly will be fun to explore
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you do anything on the computer that enjoys multiple cores?

You will lose some performance during older games that like 1/2/4 cores, since you dont have an extra 1ghz core speed....

But I think it sounds like a heck of a nice upgrade if you can benefit from the extra core count.

I certainly would not turn down a chance to get an extra 4/8 cores/threads, even with the small downgrade in core clock.

That xeon might actually overclock quite well, who knows.


It certainly will be fun to explore
well, I guess i have to wait until i received to start playing with it, and no, no multicore task on my end, just gaming, i game on 2k 75hz monitor (i dont like 4k for gaming) i have a hardcore custom loop, one day i decided to run my 3930k stock speeds (3.2ghz) and i got the same fps than 4.6ghz speed, and the usage was 30-37%.. so.. lets say i manage to reach 3.7ghz on the xeon, i will be more than happy anyways.
 

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Some Ivy-EP Xeons OC very well, and usually better than the consumer version, like my 1660 V2 at 4.7GHz. There are 1680 V2's running 4.8GHz 24/7 also. The 2000+ series are locked, as far as we know. You're going to lose about 22% performance in workloads that rely only up to 6 cores / 12 threads, due to the 1GHz drop. That means most of your gaming will see that drop, since they mostly use 2-4 threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some Ivy-EP Xeons OC very well, and usually better than the consumer version, like my 1660 V2 at 4.7GHz. There are 1680 V2's running 4.8GHz 24/7 also. The 2000+ series are locked, as far as we know. You're going to lose about 22% performance in workloads that rely only up to 6 cores / 12 threads, due to the 1GHz drop. That means most of your gaming will see that drop, since they mostly use 2-4 threads.
Thanks for the info. Well I guess I will see how it goes.
 

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You can achieve better overall performance if you simply set all your system and network process's inside task manager to those last 4 cores once you get the new chip.

Not having the first 4-6 occupied by random system usage will help you out enough to show a difference. No idea if that will end up in a double digit FPS gain, but perhaps something.

On my 8core AMD FX chip, setting system stuff to the odd-number cores and using the even-number cores for my stuff (steam, internet browser, etc..) I see a very noticeable impact.

It is mostly due to how the core modules are set up (dual data, single instruction handlers?) that I get a big change.

Still, moving the system stuff to the extra cores should help alot in everyday use, and should help games quite a bit.
 

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You can achieve better overall performance if you simply set all your system and network process's inside task manager to those last 4 cores once you get the new chip.

Not having the first 4-6 occupied by random system usage will help you out enough to show a difference. No idea if that will end up in a double digit FPS gain, but perhaps something.

On my 8core AMD FX chip, setting system stuff to the odd-number cores and using the even-number cores for my stuff (steam, internet browser, etc..) I see a very noticeable impact.

It is mostly due to how the core modules are set up (dual data, single instruction handlers?) that I get a big change.

Still, moving the system stuff to the extra cores should help alot in everyday use, and should help games quite a bit.
That is amazing advice and I never thought of it before. When you assign the processes to a core are you using Task Manager? And do you know a way to do this that will persist thru resets? Is this with all "system" processes?

Mind-blown XD
 

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processor lasso? I think thats the name. It can set persistent cpu affinity (what dictates which cores are available for processes to use)


My rig is nearly 24/7, so I spend 5-15 minutes using task manager and manually doing it, it persists until reboot, then its back to default.

If I dont do it, I get random slow downs. Its much more apparent of a change on poorly optimized cpu's like AMD FX, but still owrks if you generally only work over 2-4 cores.


Use those extra cores to your maximum advantage!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You can achieve better overall performance if you simply set all your system and network process's inside task manager to those last 4 cores once you get the new chip.

Not having the first 4-6 occupied by random system usage will help you out enough to show a difference. No idea if that will end up in a double digit FPS gain, but perhaps something.

On my 8core AMD FX chip, setting system stuff to the odd-number cores and using the even-number cores for my stuff (steam, internet browser, etc..) I see a very noticeable impact.

It is mostly due to how the core modules are set up (dual data, single instruction handlers?) that I get a big change.

Still, moving the system stuff to the extra cores should help alot in everyday use, and should help games quite a bit.
wow, such a value advise. thanks i will try it
 

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Thanks mattliston I appreciate the advice. I'm gonna try that out. Good looking out!
 

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I definitely think it has at least 4.4ghz in it.

Xeons are not exactly over volted from the factory. They are designed for efficiency under work load.
do some more stress testing, perhaps hit prime95 blend test for at least 4 hours, and verify what you have shown.

if it is indeed stable at stock voltage and 3.8ghz, save all those settings, or write them down.

Then crank the speed up 100-150mhz, and again, stress for stable voltage.

Do this in small steps, because at some point, you are going to hit a HARSH voltage wall, where it absolutely devours voltage that it needs to clock.

Here is hoping its much closer to 5ghz!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I definitely think it has at least 4.4ghz in it.

Xeons are not exactly over volted from the factory. They are designed for efficiency under work load.
do some more stress testing, perhaps hit prime95 blend test for at least 4 hours, and verify what you have shown.

if it is indeed stable at stock voltage and 3.8ghz, save all those settings, or write them down.

Then crank the speed up 100-150mhz, and again, stress for stable voltage.

Do this in small steps, because at some point, you are going to hit a HARSH voltage wall, where it absolutely devours voltage that it needs to clock.

Here is hoping its much closer to 5ghz!
115 mhz is the limit , and yes, is 100% stable, 8 hours in prime blend test. i find ZERO info about ocing this specific cpu, i will post some bios setting, meybe u can help me abit
 
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