Overclock.net banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey, I have an Intel P4 2.4GhZ northy with an ASUS P4PE-X. The multiplyer is locked at 18x. I heard something in another thread that went missing that it's becuse of Intel's EIST, and that I could turn off this EIST. I know it's turned off in the BIOS somewhere, but if anyone knows what this is could they direct me to where I could change it? I would definately like to lower that multiplyer! Any suggestions to what? Somewhere near 10 better..?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,804 Posts
EIST is software you download that will let you change your multiplier while still in windows. I don't like it because everytime you reboot you have to change the settings back to what you want.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Awesome. Thanks man. Any suggestions for more multiplyer VS. less multiplyer? Kinda like the classic Acceleration VS. Max speed question but converted into computers
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,804 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by Kopi

Awesome. Thanks man. Any suggestions for more multiplyer VS. less multiplyer? Kinda like the classic Acceleration VS. Max speed question but converted into computers

Dropping your multi is always nice cause you can squeez some more bandwidth out giving you better perf. In the end A higher ghz rating is better than a higher fsb.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,696 Posts
EIST or Intel Speedstep Technology is actually a technology that is built into the later CPU's in the form TM2. There may also be an application called EIST out there but I have not heard of it.
EIST automatically changes the system multiplier to suit what you are doing. Your Northwood CPU will not have it, I am also not sure if your board supports it either.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,804 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by The_Manual

EIST or Intel Speedstep Technology is actually a technology that is built into the later CPU's in the form TM2. There may also be an application called EIST out there but I have not heard of it.
EIST automatically changes the system multiplier to suit what you are doing. Your Northwood CPU will not have it, I am also not sure if your board supports it either.

If you google it EIST is an app for changing your multi.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well thanks guys, I'll look into that link which was given.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,696 Posts
Hmm odd I have never seen that application, I have seen others for direct multiplier writing to the PLL chip but not this one.
Im supprised that Intel have allowed that name as EIST (Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology) is, I believe, a registered Intel trademark...

Note: As in responce to the first post, if a system has EIST enabled on a Pentium 4 processor they will only be able to select the default multiplier and the x14 one.


Edit: Thanks for the info though, I will bookmark the application.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,325 Posts
I really wouldn't call it software. It's more like firmware since it's built directly into the hardware.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Well I've looked at a couple sites and they tell me that I can turn off this EIST. I needed to download new BIOS. Alright, done and done. Now what? Here is what it said I was to do.

1. Download and run the latest BIOS update for you motherboard. You can download related BIOS from MSI web site (www.msi.com.tw)
2. Ensure Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology is enabled in your BIOS.
3. Ensure your OS has support for Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology. For Windows* XP SP2 operating systems install Windows XP SP2* if you haven't already done so.
4. Finally Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology must be turned on in the OS. Currently, for Windows* XP SP2 operating systems Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology by default is off. To turn it on do the following:
- Under Control Panel - open Power Options
- Under the Power Schemes pull down menu
- To turn Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology ON select, "Minimal Power Management," power scheme.
- To turn Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology OFF select, "Always On," power scheme.


Done step one. Hmm. Now the rest is complicated. If someone could simplify it a little bit? Hoping step 2 was correct I completed step 3 quite easily. Step 4, I also completed. After I did this I did a quick reboot just to make sure, and check the CPU-Z. Still underclocked to 2.07 on a 2.4GhZ CPU. pllllleaaaasssseeeeee help!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Well, I found out whats going on. I downloaded the BIOS, put them on a floppy and did what was necessary. I followed the steps and booted with the floppy and everything, still no EIST. I just gave up to be honest. I've tried everything. I went into the BIOS and upped my Frequency to 130x18. So now Im at 2.4 anyways, and its actually 2 degrees cooler than before lol! No harm done, although it would have been nice. Thanks guys. If you ever see Roxter around here too, he's a good guy who helped me do alot of this over MSN. "Props" lol
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,696 Posts
Quote:


I really wouldn't call it software. It's more like firmware since it's built directly into the hardware.

Intel's EIST is a set of intructions that are built into a CPU. The EIST we were talking about before is a piece of software that works in an operating system interface, not the EIST extension/instruction.

As to the thread starter, as I said in my original post your CPU does not have EIST built into it, which means that no matter what you do you can not use it to drop to a x14 multipler.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Damn. I was hoping your were wrong lol
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top