Overclock.net banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
A title was here
Joined
·
4,118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A few weeks ago I noticed my PC became intermittently sluggish, one second it was fine, another it was sluggish. When opening File Explorer and clicking 'This PC' it would sometimes freeze for a few seconds and/or the screens were refresh as if it was a display driver error only without the warning popup.

Windows 10 is on the Samsung 830 pro, games are on the 1TB Western Digital Caviar Black, and the 2TB WD Blue is new and purely for storage. The GPU, motherboard, case, PSU, ram, CPU + cooler are less than one year old. One of the WD CB drives suffered massive data corruption a dew days after I built this system and I secure wiped it and tossed it. The SSD is 5-6 years old, one HDD is even older, and the other drive is a week old. I updated to the latest motherboard firmware, Windows 10 is fully updated and I noticed there were some other updates that might be the cause but I'm unaware if that's the case, and GPU drivers are updated.

My ram cleared 4 Memtest 7.4 passes with no errors, I had no issues in 15 minutes of various CPU and GPU benchmarks, and voltages + temps for everything are far below anything worth worrying about, the SSD and HDD's pass every check in Samsung Magician and CrystalDiskInfo, I've done full scans with Windows Defender and then tried Malwarebytes and nothing was detected.

Is it a safe assumption the SSD is dying ?

Is it possible one of the mechanical drives is failing ?

I don't see how the one 6+ year old mechanical drive would be causing issues in things other than File Explorer as nearly every issue is occurring when it involves the SSD.
 

·
Senior OCN Member
Joined
·
39,878 Posts
Download Seagate Seatools and run some tests on the drive
If the drive fails any of the tests freeze or crash during testing you can assume the drive is dying
 

·
A title was here
Joined
·
4,118 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Download Seagate Seatools and run some tests on the drive
If the drive fails any of the tests freeze or crash during testing you can assume the drive is dying
SSD passed every test. I didn't notice any freezing and it definitely didn't crash.

Ran every test except Long Generic on the two mechanicals and they passed every test.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,981 Posts
Can you share screenshots of CrystalDiskInfo for your three drives? I vaguely remember that I've seen something where a drive's S.M.A.R.T. record had suspicious entries while CrystalDiskInfo was still judging the drive as being okay.

Maybe it's Windows or one of your running programs. Here's some ideas about that:

What I would try first is, think back on when these problems first started happening. If you have a date, you can then go to the Control Panel and compare when you installed or updated programs, or look for when Windows updated something automatically. There were two or three different views with lists for that in the old style Control Panel (but I'm not using Windows a lot right now, so I don't know how things are in current Windows). One view was the one where you "Uninstall programs". It has a date column that you can use to sort the list. The other view I remember is, a list about what Windows Update did in the past, also with a date column.

Is the problem only happening in File Explorer? Programs can add plugins to Explorer, and maybe something about that is causing it? I remember I had suspicious performance issues that were caused by a part of the backup software I was using. I could fix it by disabling its Explorer integration through a tool named "Nirsoft ShellExView".

An AntiVirus is allowed to stop everything on the computer to do its job. Perhaps check how things behave with the AntiVirus disabled.
 

·
Senior OCN Member
Joined
·
39,878 Posts
The SSD might not be the drive failing as it could be one of the two HDD´s
Try and discount one or both of the HDD´s and see if that makes any difference

I have had a brand new HDD do almost exactly the same thing your PC does so the new HDD might actually be the bad drive
 

·
A title was here
Joined
·
4,118 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
As I stated earlier the issues seemed to coincide with a few 'cumulative updates' for Windows, but that could easily be a coincidence.

Windows Defender doesn't appear to be the issue. I was also having an issue with the right click context menu vanishing unless I clicked it twice then moved over to the right more and then down. What I uninstalled may have fixed that.

I already did the generic process of checking for anything that might be severely outdated and has a running background process. I uninstalled a few things and the system seems to be back to its original snappiness, but that's how the system's behaved since the issue first appeared although it was never quite back to its original snappiness.

It wasn't just File Explorer, but that was something that I could use 50% of the time to cause.
 

Attachments

·
A title was here
Joined
·
4,118 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The SSD might not be the drive failing as it could be one of the two HDD´s
Try and discount one or both of the HDD´s and see if that makes any difference

I have had a brand new HDD do almost exactly the same thing your PC does so the new HDD might actually be the bad drive
It was doing this before the new drive was added.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,981 Posts
In that screenshot you shared, there's these interesting entries:

For your Samsung SSD 830:

"CRC Error Count" = "11" (that "B" in the raw value column means "11" when translated from hex)

For your 1 TB sized WD HDD:

"UltraDMA CRC Error Count" = also "11"

I don't know what the entry for the Samsung drive means. I'm guessing it's bad. Maybe see what Google can find about it. I would regularly check this entry to see if it increases and save screenshots. Somewhere in the menu of CrystalDiskInfo's window, you can switch the "Raw Values" column into decimal mode. You can then read the numbers there a lot easier. It will start showing "11" instead of "0000000B".

The "UltraDMA CRC" entry for the WD HDD is not really bad. If you notice that the number continues to increase in the future, it can often be fixed by replacing the SATA data cable for the drive.

About what to do next, maybe check the read speeds over the whole drive surface with "HD Tune". It might produce an interesting graph if there's read issues on the drive. You can increase the block size HD Tune uses in its options to make sure the SSD can reach its full speeds.
 

·
A title was here
Joined
·
4,118 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
In that screenshot you shared, there's these interesting entries:

For your Samsung SSD 830:

"CRC Error Count" = "11" (that "B" in the raw value column means "11" when translated from hex)

For your 1 TB sized WD HDD:

"UltraDMA CRC Error Count" = also "11"

I don't know what the entry for the Samsung drive means. I'm guessing it's bad. Maybe see what Google can find about it. I would regularly check this entry to see if it increases and save screenshots. Somewhere in the menu of CrystalDiskInfo's window, you can switch the "Raw Values" column into decimal mode. You can then read the numbers there a lot easier. It will start showing "11" instead of "0000000B".

The "UltraDMA CRC" entry for the WD HDD is not really bad. If you notice that the number continues to increase in the future, it can often be fixed by replacing the SATA data cable for the drive.

About what to do next, maybe check the read speeds over the whole drive surface with "HD Tune". It might produce an interesting graph if there's read issues on the drive. You can increase the block size HD Tune uses in its options to make sure the SSD can reach its full speeds.
The slowdowns/freezing/stutter seem to have been fixed. I'm unsure of what did it as I installed some things and also reconnected the SATA cables to the drives. Was too lazy to remove the GPU to reconnect the cables to the board.

The value hasn't up up either.

Guess I'll hold off on replacing the SSD, thanks for the help.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top