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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My specs are in my sig. I wanted to know if I could push my 3770K to 4.0GHz with my current setup. I would like some detailed steps. There are 2 overclocking guides but one of them is for LN2 and the other for ASUS mobos. I have a gigabyte mobo as you can see. I would like all four of the cores to be overclocked.

Thanks in advance. Going to sleep now. Will check in the morning.
 

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That Gigabyte guide you are probably thinking about is not for LN2. It just has an LN2 section. I don't think you can get any more detailed explanations than in that guide.

The ASRock board Sandy Bridge + Ivy Bridge guide is the easiest to follow, but might not help you much as things will work differently on your board. You might still want to look at the ASRock guide as it's well organized. It will show how you need to think, how to organize the necessary steps in your mind and in practice. It will show you how you can test your settings for stability and has a zip file package with all programs you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry for not replying earlier; my email notification system is not working. Thanks I'll look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I increased the multiplier for all four cores to 40 from 39 and it was running fine at 4.0 ghz. I ran prime95 for 3-4hrs but then had to shut it down due to scheduled power outages. Next I bumped up all four multipliers to 41 and this time CPU-Z shows fluctuating multiplier and frequency. It fluctuates between 2 states 4.1 ghz and 1.6 ghz. The multipliers also fluctuate from 41 to 16 and all this at idle and I have left the voltage and other settings at AUTO.

Any Idea why this might be happening? I'm a total noob to overclocking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Anyone?
 

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If this is while you are just sitting at the desktop and browsing the web or something, that's really just normal behavior caused by power saving features. You can disable everything about that, but it shouldn't be necessary. While a program is using 100% of a core, things should stay at full speed.

If this is happening while something like the prime95 stress test is running, that means there's a problem somewhere. There might be a power limit configured somewhere in the BIOS for example. The power delivery parts around the CPU socket might be too hot. The CPU might be too hot.

The power saving settings in the BIOS are called "EIST = Intel SpeedStep", "C1E = Enhanced Halt", "C3", "C6", "C-states".

In Windows there's a "high performance" power plan and the default "balanced" one. That "EIST" setting in the BIOS is related to the speed reducing that happens with the "balanced" power plan. If this is used, this will show all kinds of speeds, not just full speed and 1600 MHz.

The C-state stuff is something that is done by the CPU itself without Windows. It is about stopping the clock and cutting power to parts of the CPU while the cores are idle and waiting for a new job. It shows a bit of 1600 MHz in monitoring programs, but the CPU really tries to go to full speed as fast as possible when it wakes up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
1. So disabling the EIST will be better or makes no difference?

2. Secondly, I've read about the base clock being modified and then there is increasing the frequencies of the individual cores. Are these 2 separate types of overclocking? In the frequency bump that I've given to the individual cores do I need to do anything else like lower the VCORE voltage? I'm not interested in overclocking RAM but would like lower temps with the current hardware and a stable overclock.
 

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The settings named C1E and C3/C6, you should keep enabled. They do a lot for better (lower) temperatures on the desktop.

For EIST, you should keep it enabled if your overclocking uses "offset" for the Vcore. You can disable it if you use "fixed" Vcore because reducing speed is a bit pointless if the voltage is fixed.

About the base clock, from what I know about Gigabyte Z77 boards, it should actually never change the base clock even if you use the option for that in the BIOS. It instead secretly changes the Turbo Boost speeds. It is the same as setting the four Turbo speeds manually to the same number. That base clock setting only works right if you leave the Turbo settings on Auto.

You can configure four different Turbo Boost speeds. This is not about speeds for the four individual cores. It is about speed changing depending on how many cores are running or asleep. For example if two cores are running and two cores are asleep, it will use the second number for speed. This is not interesting for a desktop CPU. It's more an idea for laptop CPUs.

If you leave Vcore settings on Auto, it should be very similar to what offset overclocking does. The BIOS will take the "VID" voltage that the CPU says it wants, then add something to it. The voltage will change dynamically and go down when the CPU runs at lower speeds because that VID number changes with speed.

You can't really guess what it will do at full speeds because that "Auto" offset is something secret. This makes it scary. You should always use the manual offset instead of Auto. To use a manual offset, you set Vcore in the BIOS to "Normal" instead of Auto. The next line will light up. That's where you type in the offset voltage.

This is if you want dynamically changing voltage. The changing voltage is interesting because it makes EIST useful. If you want things to run at full speed always, and don't want to use EIST, then better use a fixed Vcore voltage. It is easier to find a stable overclock with fixed voltage.

To use fixed voltage, simply select the Vcore setting in the BIOS and type a number.

Don't forget to set "LLC = load-line calibration" like described in the overclocking guide for Gigabyte boards. The LLC setting influences Vcore a lot.

Here are details about EIST and stuff, you might not want to read it unless you are interested:
EIST enabled and using the balanced power plan in Windows basically works like this: if the CPU usage for all cores is very low as seen in the Windows task manager, something like 10% for example, Windows will start to reduce speeds. The idea is that if the load is 10% at a speed like 3800 MHz, the load would still only be 23% or so at 1600 MHz, so reducing speed is not a problem.

The other thing you have to know about this is what that 10% load really looks like from the point of view of the CPU. What it means is that there is no program running that actually does non-stop work. A program that actually computes something looks like 100% load. What happens in that 10% load example is that the only programs running are things that wait for some sort of event, they process any event that happens and go back to waiting. The CPU switches between on and off all the time. A 10% load means it is asleep 90% of the time.

That's where it gets interesting with regards to power saving and reduced speed. If you allow Windows to reduce speed through EIST, this will save less power than you might think. When the CPU runs at reduced speeds, it will take longer to process events. It will sleep less than when running at full speed. EIST is still not bad. The temperatures when you are doing boring things on the desktop will look a good bit better if EIST is enabled. Don't forget that this needs the "balanced" power plan in Windows or it won't really get used.

The big thing for power saving are the C-states and the features that work on that. When the CPU is waiting and not doing anything, this will do things like stop the clock and cut power. In that 10% load example, this would mean that 90% of the time, the CPU is off and uses close to no power. This also happens if you have EIST disabled and the 10% load runs at full speed.

You should try to keep everything related to the C-states enabled. It should work on a 3770k CPU and Z77 board. Older CPU generations had stability problems with this, but this should be fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks.
 
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