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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently given a Princeton Graphics monitor that had a burnt out logic board. After replacing the board, the monitor will power on and stay on (not go into standby), search for input, but when it gets to the DVI it will flash the desktop for a split second before going black. I cant get any response from the monitor after without cutting power to it. I have tried switching ports on the video card, and i know that the cord is a good one, and i have tried changing settings on the display options which only result in the screen flashing then going black again. I would assume there is something that needs replacing but im not sure what.
 

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Welcome to OCN!

I'm certainly not an expert about this kind of thing, but have you tried changing the refresh rate or color profile? Also, does it work with on any of the other inputs (like vga or hdmi)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have not tried the VGA input on the new board, ill try that next. But as for the rest, I cant change any of the settings in on the monitor because it wont let me access it. It seems to go into a standby where it is fully on, but there is no interaction available. Sometimes when i tweak the settings on the computer, i can get a flicker of what it should be showing, but then it goes back to black again, if that makes a difference.
 

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Yeah, I was talking about refresh and colors on the computer, but it sounds like you already tried that
 

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There is definably something else fried. at first i was gonna say the lcd inverter but, for one that might be laptop only and that's if the screen cuts out, like a sputtering engine low on fuel. cause the inverter isn't supplying the need power i'd assume. in this case it sounds like something more intricate than the inverter maybe another logic board.
 

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You might want to check the capacitors; in an effort to save money, a lot of caps recently have been manufactured with less-than-stable cells which cause a gas release, killing them over some time. There are many reports of monitors having capacitor issues - it's not rare by any means. Look for capacitors that are bulging, leaking, or that have split tops (the tops of caps are made to expand). Here's an example of a bulging capacitor:



As always, be cautious in opening up your monitor as there are currents inside that can be lethal if not properly discharged. Hope this helps!

All the best,

Z
 
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