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Linky http://forwardthinking.pcmag.com/none/302957-globalfoundries-sees-14nm-production-in-2014
Quote:
Globalfoundries now plans on implementing 14nm FinFET transistors in 2014, using the same "middle of line" and "back end" processes it is using for its 20nm production next year. As a result, Subramani "Subi" Kengeri, vice president of design solutions, says the foundry believes its customers will be able to reuse the bulk of their designs for 20nm and move to 14nm very easily. He said there are around 7,000 design rules for chip companies in creating 20nm chips and that will carry over to the 14nm generation. There are only about 60 new design rules for the FinFETs. Thus, this should help companies leverage their designs among the two generations.
First news post. Pleash don't kill me if I dids something wrong.

EDIT: maybe should be in tech/science instead of hardware? my bad
Yeroon
 

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Many tiny things shall come of this. Maybe for once, AMD can do something right.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disturbed117 View Post

Amd has done plenty of things right in the past.
It's been a while. While they've made good choices recently, Intel's beaten them in pretty much every category, with the exception of GPU muscle. However, that lead will be disintegrating next year. Can't expect much in the area of drivers from Intel, but AMD needs to do something revolutionary. They're losing the evolutionary game.
 

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But Global Foundries isn't even part of AMD anymore.

358851-gf-14nm.jpg?thumb=y


Whats with their timeline, 28nm in 2011? Are they really shipping products on 28nm? Cause I thought it was late 2012 and we were still waiting on volume 28nm.

Edit: Ah ha. Its seems the first 28nm was taped out "Q4 2011". So that timeline isn't talking about shipping products.

If we went off tape out dates, intel is already at 14nm in 2012.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disturbed117 View Post

Amd has done plenty of things right in the past.
I have to agree. While I didn't jump on the bulldozer wagon, I'm enjoying my APU and think that AMD is heading in the right direction.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by erunion View Post

But Global Foundries isn't even part of AMD anymore.
358851-gf-14nm.jpg?thumb=y

Whats with their timeline, 28nm in 2011? Are they really shipping products on 28nm? Cause I thought it was late 2012 and we were still waiting on volume 28nm.
Edit: Ah ha. Its seems the first 28nm was taped out "Q4 2011". So that timeline isn't talking about shipping products.
If we went off tape out dates, intel is already at 14nm in 2012.
I think 7970s were launched in late dec 2011 with limited qualities. I think, or something like that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by erunion View Post

But Global Foundries isn't even part of AMD anymore.
358851-gf-14nm.jpg?thumb=y

Whats with their timeline, 28nm in 2011? Are they really shipping products on 28nm? Cause I thought it was late 2012 and we were still waiting on volume 28nm.
Edit: Ah ha. Its seems the first 28nm was taped out "Q4 2011". So that timeline isn't talking about shipping products.
If we went off tape out dates, intel is already at 14nm in 2012.
lol wow, really puts things in perspective...so Intel's lead is really a good two years?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by flamingoyster View Post

lol wow, really puts things in perspective...so Intel's lead is really a good two years?
Globalfoundries is already converting the new fab8 in New York to 14nm. This means that they already have working samples. They plan on tapping out customer's chips in late 2013 with mass production being 2014 (they have already made process development kits available according to this site). Intel and GF will launch 14nm products at almost the same time.

Intel's lead is a somewhat debatable item anyway (especially in the long term as I wrote about below). This timescale (leapfrogging to launch 14nm at almost the same time as Intel) will hurt Intel significantly. Intel will be pushing out 22nm Atom processors (soon) to compete with ARM and MIPS, but they will probably be only marginally faster and about the same in performance per watt despite being on a smaller node (1/2 node smaller than 28nm). Intel has been relying on it's node advantage to compete with better architectures. Take this away and Atom will be crushed in both power and performance. This announcement says that Intel won't have the node advantage that it MUST have in order to compete in the very-low-power segment for long enough to win big. Despite the little coverage on OCN, this is huge.

Another thing to consider is after 10nm (further nodes won't offer full shrinks, only partial shrinks of the parts that are still a little bigger than one or two atoms in size). While Intel is putting some resources into replacing silicon (this must be done within a few months of 10nm else the bottom will drop out of Intel stocks as they can no longer ensure their "Moore's Law" business model), the majority of investments into the long-term future of fabrication (carbon nanotubes, memristors, optics, graphene, etc) is being done by the joint venture that is HP, GF, IBM, samsung, etc. With a long line of IP protecting them, Intel will have quite a battle (even now) to enter the market without paying loads of cash to license patents. Even if the license the technology, I doubt that Intel has what it takes to catch up with the R&D that's currently being done.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by erunion View Post

But Global Foundries isn't even part of AMD anymore.
358851-gf-14nm.jpg?thumb=y

Whats with their timeline, 28nm in 2011? Are they really shipping products on 28nm? Cause I thought it was late 2012 and we were still waiting on volume 28nm.
Edit: Ah ha. Its seems the first 28nm was taped out "Q4 2011". So that timeline isn't talking about shipping products.
If we went off tape out dates, intel is already at 14nm in 2012.
Well you see its basic economics low costs means low profit margin. High cost means high profit margins. People were complaining about high costs so companies offshore everything to China and now low costs but low profit margins so they will squeeze whatever profit until they can.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Homeles View Post

It's been a while. While they've made good choices recently, Intel's beaten them in pretty much every category, with the exception of GPU muscle. However, that lead will be disintegrating next year. Can't expect much in the area of drivers from Intel, but AMD needs to do something revolutionary. They're losing the evolutionary game.
/agree

What AMD needs is Steamroller to be a bang up design. PD looks like am improvement but not likely to change anything. SR could be their chance to be competitive again. If they don't I think they really are done in the enthusiast CPU market.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hajile View Post

This announcement says that Intel won't have the node advantage that it MUST have in order to compete in the very-low-power segment for long enough to win big. Despite the little coverage on OCN, this is huge.
I guess it depends how much weight you put in it. I put it in the FUD column.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hajile View Post

Globalfoundries is already converting the new fab8 in New York to 14nm. This means that they already have working samples. They plan on tapping out customer's chips in late 2013 with mass production being 2014 (they have already made process development kits available according to this site). Intel and GF will launch 14nm products at almost the same time.
Intel's lead is a somewhat debatable item anyway (especially in the long term as I wrote about below). This timescale (leapfrogging to launch 14nm at almost the same time as Intel) will hurt Intel significantly. Intel will be pushing out 22nm Atom processors (soon) to compete with ARM and MIPS, but they will probably be only marginally faster and about the same in performance per watt despite being on a smaller node (1/2 node smaller than 28nm). Intel has been relying on it's node advantage to compete with better architectures. Take this away and Atom will be crushed in both power and performance. This announcement says that Intel won't have the node advantage that it MUST have in order to compete in the very-low-power segment for long enough to win big. Despite the little coverage on OCN, this is huge.
Another thing to consider is after 10nm (further nodes won't offer full shrinks, only partial shrinks of the parts that are still a little bigger than one or two atoms in size). While Intel is putting some resources into replacing silicon (this must be done within a few months of 10nm else the bottom will drop out of Intel stocks as they can no longer ensure their "Moore's Law" business model), the majority of investments into the long-term future of fabrication (carbon nanotubes, memristors, optics, graphene, etc) is being done by the joint venture that is HP, GF, IBM, samsung, etc. With a long line of IP protecting them, Intel will have quite a battle (even now) to enter the market without paying loads of cash to license patents. Even if the license the technology, I doubt that Intel has what it takes to catch up with the R&D that's currently being done.
Do you have any links about research Intel and GF are doing into post-silicon fabs?
 
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